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CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE: 



A HISTORY 



OF 



CHARLESTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS, 

1775—1887. 

WITH SURVEYS, RECORDS, AND TWENTY-EIGHT PAGES OF 
PLANS AND VIEWS. 



/^ 



JAMES F. HUNNEWELL, 

AUTHOK OF THE HISTORICAL MONUMENTS OF FRANCE, 
THE IMPERIAL ISLAND, ETC. 




^^6 7^^ 



BOSTON: 
LITTLE, BROWN, AND COMPANY. 

1888. 






Copyrigld, 1888, 
By James F. Hunnewell. 



Universitt Press: 
John ^YILsoN and Son, Cambridge. 



TO MY SON, 

games iHelbiUe lE)unuelDell, 

THIS HISTORY 

OF 

HIS NATIVE TOWN 



IS DEDICATED. 




'S -~^ • (oL William Pre^cott- 

^ ■ 0\ THE. 

" Hf rglitj of (^f^arlotowi^ 

® TUM: 17. 1/7^. « 

P/lOE 82 . 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

Preface ix 

A Century of Town Life 1 

The Town burned in 1775 2 

Its destruction, 6; extent of the fire, 8; losses, 11. 

The Rebuilding of the Town 15 

Its condition in 1785, 17; 1st bridge, 18; newspaper, 18; print- 
ing, 20 ; and church, 20. 
The New Town 22 

History, 1783-1834 24 

Religious, 24: ; Politics, 30] dimness, 31 (canal, 31 ; real estate, 32; 
manufacturing, Si; banking, 34). 

Condition, 1834 35 

History since 1834 38 

Religious, 38; Politics, 42; Business, 45 (railroads, 45; compa- 
nies, 48; Waverley House, 48; banks, gas, and water, 49). 

Places of Public Worship, 1783-1887 50 

Institutions 61 

Benevolence, 61; fire societies, 64; military y 65. 

Other Public Buildings 67 

Powder-house, 67 ; Convent, 69 ; Town Hall, 71 ; School- Houses, 
72; Places of Amusement, 73. 

Monuments 74 

OldBurial-Ground, 74; Bunker Hill, 79; soldiers', 82 ; statues, 82. 

National and State Institutions, etc 82 

Navy Yard, 83; State Prison, 84; McLean Asylum, 85. 

Old Houses 86 



vi CONTENTS. 

Page 

Libraries and Literaiy Societies 98 

Social History 104 

Plan of the Village of Charlestown, 1638, (with a description) 109 

Plans of the Town burned in 1775 and afterwards rebuilt . . . 112 
With a Survey of the lands and buildings in 1775 and since, and no- 
tices of occupants. 

Claims for Losses in 1775 157 

Historical Sketch of the First Church 175 

Its Records, 1789-1832 193 

Admissions, 194; Baptisms, 206; Marriages, 240; Deaths, 255. 

Bibliography 261 

Before the Revolution, 2G2; Bunl:erHiU,2Qo; since 1775, 2G9; Ad- 
dresses, Annexation, 269; Benevolent Institutions, Bridges, 
270; Canal, Catalogues, 271 ; Churches, 272; Companies, Con- 
vent, 273; McLean Asylum, Memorials and Lives, 274; Mili- 
tary, 276; Newspapers (full list). 277; Schools, Societies, 278; 
State Prison, 279; Trials, 280; Works printed in the town, 
1786-1836 (full list), 281; Authors, native and resident. 292. 
Index 301 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



1. Statue of Col. William Prescott Frontispiece. 

From a pen and ink drawing by H. Jaclison, as also are 13, 16, and 26. To 
insure accuracy, all are based on photographed lines. 

2. Charlestown in Flames Page 3 

Reduced from Barnard's "England," folio, 1783. 

3. View of Bunker's Hill 8 

From the "Gentleman's Magazine," Feb., 1790. 

4. Charles River Bridge 19 

From the "New York Magazine," Sep., 1795 (diifering in sky, boats, 
wharf, etc., from a view in the "Massachusetts Magazine," Sep., 1789). 

5. Malden Bridge from Bunker's Hill 20 

From the "Massachusetts Magazine," Sep., 1790. 

6. Spire of the Meeting-House of the First Church . . 52 

With changes in the body of the house, proposed 1803. 

7. Elevation of the Side of the Interior, 1804 .... 52 

8. 9. Plan of the Pews on the Floor, 1804 52 

10, 11. Plan of the Pews in the Gallery, i804 52 

Both are before the alterations in 1804, and the six pages are reduced from 
drawings made at that time. 

12. View of Charlestown, 1848 59 

From a sketch made on Cambridge road. 

13. The Powder House, 1887 67 

14. The Town Hall, and Warren Phalanx, 1838 .... 71 

From a lithograph of that date. 

15. The State Prison, 1806 84 

Eeduced from a copper-plate then printed in Charlestown. 

16. House of James Russell, 1790-I866 89 

17. Navy Yard and Old Houses, 1826 91 

18. House of Jas. F. Hunnewell, 1887 96 

From a photograph, drawn in ink by E. L. Dean. 



viii ILLUSTBATIONS. 

19, 20. Sketch of Charlestown, 1638 109 

Arrangement of the village, founded on the " Book of Possessions." 

21. Map of the whole Town, 1794 113 

Plans of Estates in 1775, etc. 

22. I. The Square aud Neighborhood, 114. 

23. II. Town Hill, Bow Street, etc., 129. 

24. III. Main Street, Henley to Thompson, 142. 

25. IV. " " thence to N. of Wood, 148. 
Six pages, 19, 20, 22-25, from drawings by Jas. F. Hunnewell. 

26. Tower of the First Church, 1887 175 

27. List of Church Members in 1789 193 

Keduced from the quarto page of Record b}- the Rev. Dr. Morse. 

28. Title of the Rev. Thos. Shepard's "Eye Salve," 1673 . 2G1 

Probably the first work (except two almanacs?) written in Charlestown and 
printed in this country. From a copy owned by the writer. 

In illustrating this volume the writer has continued a practice adopted by him for sev- 
eral other books that he has published or privately printed. He has examined all that he 
could find (in some cases a large number) of the plates relating to the subject treated, and 
from them has reproduced what is best, or practicable, having some regard to age or rar- 
ity, more to excellence or interest, and most to accuracy. Of the illustrations here (28 
full pages), 12 have been made for the work, 19 are from pen-and-ink drawings, 5 are 
from old and scarce plates, 2 from newer but not common, 1 is from Record, and 1 from 
a title very rare in such fine condition. Nearh' all the originals are in the writer's col- 
lection; but the Record (27) belongs to the First Church, the plate of the Town Hall (14) 
to the Bostonian Society (both copied by permission), one (10) belongs to the Charlestown 
I'ublic Library, and one (17) is used by the courtesy of Mr. Edes. Five subjects are for 
accuracy based on photographed lines, and seven pages are from drawings by the writer 
(12, 19, 20, 22-25). At first he thouglit of reproducing a considerable number of wood- 
cuts, made in the course of the past fifty years, as the only existing representations of 
buildings destroyed or altered ; but as some of the cuts are rudely engraved, and most of 
them are inaccurate, they are omitted. Everything given here (except curiosities, 2 to 5) 
can be relied on, even the view in 1848 (12), which, though it has little art, shows very 
closely the forms and positions of meeting-houses and prominent buildings as they then 
were. Views of Bunker Hill Monument are so numerous and good that none seem to be 
needed here. Of course more might be given, but the number is already liberal, the 
selection is careful, and the subjects are representative. 



PREFACE, 



npHIS book contains, first, a history of Charlestown, Massa- 
•*■ chusetts, from its destruction in 1775 ^ to the present 
time, in which the characteristics of growth or action — about 
all for which this busy world has time — are shown unincum- 
bered by a great deal of detail. Next, there is a sketch, very 
hard to make, of the original town in 1638, and then, with 
more minuteness, a survey of the town burned, and of build- 
ings at that time and since on the ground, together with 
notices of occupants, — showing how the writer was obliged 
to work lot by lot through hundreds of estates and diversi- 
fied or complex accounts in order to make a simple statement 
of the limits of the fire and the nature and position of the 
losses. Following this are records, entire, and not extracts, 
important and hitherto unprinted, in regard to a great num- 
ber of the inhabitants from 1775 to 1832, continuing records 
(1632-1789) that he has already made public. Lastly, there 
is an addition to his Bibliography of the place (1880) with 
fresh matter, a list of native or resident authors, and another 
of all the books (107) and pamphlets (100) that he has yet 

1 The history of the town before its destruction, as is well known, has been 
written, and by two authors who were ideals of what was desirable for their work. 
The Eev. Dr. Budington (pp. 39, 54) gave us the religious part, while the civil 
was presented by the Hon. Richard Frothingham, who was by family connected 
with the town from its settlement, and was for a long time active in its affairs. 
Both of them were fully acquainted and identified with it, and were widely known ; 
and the writer, as well as others, whose friends they had been from boyhood, felt 
a sad loss when they passed away. 

Of the large territory formerly in Charlestown, but now Somerville, but little of 
the history is given in this book, as it is already prepared by another writer. 



X PREFACE. 

found printed in the town through fifty years after the press 
was established there (1786-1836). To all this various mat- 
ter he has made an index referring to some 5,000 names, 
where in mentioning families with many persons he has ex- 
tended the division to their first initial. 

Charlestown is perhaps a unique place in the country. 
While it has a history from 1629, at least, it was wholly re- 
built, except in its outer or inland parts, since the Declara- 
tion of Independence, and has since, by an annexation, ceased 
to be individual, and has, in one way, become that American 
rarity, a completed municipality. Hence it is, certainly to 
some extent, a representative of what that important member 
of the body politic, an American town, might or would be, 
when, also in a way, beginning and ending under the influ- 
ence of a century of the national life. 

The writer's authorities are records, deeds, plans, private 
statements, the nearest complete collection of boolis and 
pamphlets about the place, and his own observation or long 
acquaintance. He has lived in the town and has known many 
of the people there through its course of change from mod- 
erate size and municipal individuality to doubled population 
and subordinate position as a part of a great city, and has 
seen many of the old, sometimes once large, families passing 
away. It is with interest in the familiar scenes and people 
that he writes their story, with an endeavor to be correct and 
just, to describe things as they have been or are, and to keep 
within limits that should protect what is private, in the last 
particular feeling, perhaps, more at liberty with his own than 
he would with what pertains to others. No one can write 
such a story without here or there some slip ; but in only one 
book does a single error make a wicked Bible, and in all 
human books, and even in some criticisms on them, there will 
be errors about facts, as well as opinions on which there are 
disagreements. Sufficient care and labor have been spent by 
the writer to make him feel that confidence can be safely put 
in the present work. In one part, however, he is obliged to 
feel doubts, that is in regard to the Plan, 1638. It is an 
approximate one, — all that ever can be made, — for the early 



PREFACE. XI 

descriptions and deeds arc so vague or imperfect that nobody 
can now safely be positive, or be accurate except in a few- 
particulars. Another exception must also, and partly for like 
reasons, be added in regard to the Survey, 1775 ; for while the 
writer feels sure about a large number of the many estates, 
about some he is in doubt, and generally has said so on the 
spot. Only one who has attempted to reconstruct from scat- 
tered materials a town burned over a hundred years ago can 
realize the difficulty of the work. The writer has, however, 
gained the end he proposed, that of learning closely the extent 
and nature of the town destroyed. In regard to any exact 
legal case about an old estate, the course to be taken is told 
on page 110 ; it is such as a business man would follow, for 
in such a case there is little in type on which he would rely. 

It is easy, in one sense, to write about the place where one 
was born, and has lived, and known many people, and when 
memory and observation, or print and writing make one feel 
sure about a great deal. Yet in another sense it is hard to 
describe events and objects without offence or without a cer- 
tain exaggeration or vagueness apt to appear in local books, — 
to be obliged to compress, and to omit much, and yet to tell 
what the results, and monuments, so to speak, really are, so 
that some correct idea may be had of them ; to look at them, 
indeed, as from the outside, as the world might, and not 
through the confined range of a merely local vision. 

Not only is it desirable, but in varying degrees it is impor- 
tant, that certain materials, or results of observations should 
be preserved, and those who can furnish them should at least 
try to do their part. Hence the writer feels that there is not 
only a reason for the present book on his native town, but 
that it properly accompanies other works on distant subjects 
that he has published. His first attempt at recording his 
observations was in what might be called only regions of ro- 
mance, but they included a great deal of real nature along 
with matter-of-fact antiquities, topography, and history, all 
made charming by the creations, as well as the genial char- 
acter and beneficent life of one of the world's great men of 
genius. "The Lands of Scott" was the result. 



xii PREFACE. 

Enlarging, or changing, a systematic observation from a 
personal or romantic subject — important nevertheless — to 
the history of a people, the writer was led to examine '*he 
objects that form their most expressive records, — the re- 
ligious, civil, military, and domestic works that embody the 
thought and spirit of the ages. These, far more than some 
persons even dream, are of extreme value, for they show the 
very essence, and most vivid and truthful expression, of his- 
tory. Yet precious as they are, many persons to whom they 
relate will take little care to save them. Our own country 
has not been excessively attentive to our scanty possessions. 
In another country the writer had seen the results of syste- 
matic efforts to preserve a great number of objects, some of 
them very large, making an admirable history of a nation 
through nearly sixty generations. His "Historical Monu- 
ments of France," with extensive details and fuller descrip- 
tions of representative works, shows how her Commission for 
their preservation, already fifty years old, has, notwithstand- 
ing all mistakes, done noble service, and proved a model for 
England and America. 

To those who speak the English tongue, and who are now 
spread throughout the world, the historic structures of the 
home-land are of even more interest. After many visits to a 
great number of these, the writer in a compact yet comprehen- 
sive way, showed their position both geographically and in 
the history of England from an obscure wilderness to world- 
wide rule. His "Imperial Island" (Boston), or "England's 
Chronicle in Stone" (London) not only shows this, but also 
may fairly stand as a trustworthy account of their condition 
and chief features, described from his own notes on the spot 
as they are to a great extent. As such an account of their 
subjects the three books will stand, and to them, based also 
on personal observation and helped by much illustrative ma- 
terial, is added the present volume. 

On Charlestown ground there are few historic stones to 
save otlier than those in the old burial-ground. There are a 
few buildings and paintings, two or three public statues, and 
one great monument to be kept as long as possible. Our 



PREFACE. Xlll 

maternal political ancestor left us few old things to care for, 
except records that she was not allowed to handle. Yet in 
reg"i-d to her we can feel that former trials are past, that our 
ends were secured, and that, in a friendly spirit, we should 
now not dwell on the past, but recognize her immense value 
in the present and future of the world's civilization. 

"With a desire to tell the story of the Bunker Hill town 
since it arose a real Phoenix, and to help preserve what might 
be lost, the writer presents this book. If his words here 
prove, as they may, his final words about the old familiar 
place, they end with kind remembrance of it, and with the 
best of wishes for Charlestown. 



Note. — The printing of this book was begun June 21, 1887, at page 109, and was 
continued to page 30O. Page 1 was begun Sep. 20. Meanwhile subjects for some addi- 
tional statements have appeared. 

In regard to Bunker Hill, Lieut.-Col. H. N. Fisher has made and exhibited to the 
Bostonian Society (Oct. 11) a large and notable map of the town and the Battle, — an 
important addition to the topographical and military literature of the place and event. 
An immense panorama of the same subject has been painted, and will be exhibited. 

Of detailed claims for losses in the town, June 17, 1775, the writer has seen (Jan. 26) 
that of Thad. Mason (see p. 131), the only one not examined when the survey (pp. 112- 
56) was prepared. Mr. Mason had, painted throughout, a three-storied house, with a 
new porch (papered), and" six rooms and the staircase handsomely papered; " also a 
new barn, chaise-house (23 x 16), woodhouse (26 X 14), hogstj', henhouse, two sheds, 
etc., and a "Summer House on the Bank handsomly finished, papered & painted, with 
a Cellar under it; " also in a garden about " 30 fine thrifty fruit Trees as Cherries, Pears, 
Plumbs, Quinces, &c., & Currents en? to make 40 or 50 Gallons of Wine yearlj'." Be- 
sides furniture, etc., he lost "2 large painted Family Peices carv'd gilt Frames £4. 16. ; 
10 metzinto Pictures, under Glass, gilt edg'd Frames a 5. 4 each — £5. 6. 8," and "28 
Pictures painted on Glass gilt Frames a 3. each — £4. 4." He also lost about 65 books 
(titles all given, 11 of them folios), but including scarceh' anything of what is called 
Americana; but there were also "ab'. 200 Pamplets, as serm» &c. great Part of 'em val- 
uable a 4*1 each," and "News Papers for 40 years past" (not valued). His total esti- 
mate for his books and pamphlets was £10. 14. 8. (See pp. 14 and 98-100.) 

The praiseworthy desire to make known interesting historic spots has led to the prep- 
aration, under the lead of Wm. Murray, of a tablet with an inscription that tells its own 
valued story: "Here was born | SAMUEL FINLEY BREESE MORSE | 27 Afril 
1791 I Inventor of the | Electric Telegraph." The stone is to be on the front of 
his birthplace (see p. 149). There, says Dr. Prime, Dr. and Mrs. Morse "began house- 
keeping, shortly" after their marriage, "in a hired house on Main Street." In a work 
about the town the honors conferred on its distinguished native should be named. He 
was a member of the Historical Institute of France (Dec. 25, 1835) ; Royal Academy of 



xiv >'OTE. 

Fine Arts, Belgium (Jan. 12, 1837) ; National Institution for the Promotion of Science, 
Washington (Oct. 12, 1841) ; ArchKoIogical Society of Belgium (June 12, 1845), American 
Philosophical Society, Philadelphia (April 21, 1848); Royal Academy of Sciences, Swe- 
den (Oct. 3, 1858) ; and Societc- de Physique et d'Histoire Naturelle, Geneva, Switzerland 
(Dec. 20, 1866); Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Boston (Nov. 19, 
1849); LL. D. by Yale College (Aug., 1846); Gold Medals from the American Institute 
(Oct. 18, 1842); Prussian for Scientilic Merit (April, 1851); Great of Arts and Sciences, 
Wurtemberg (Feb., 1852); do. Science and Art, Austria (Aug., 1855); Order of Noble 
Exalted Glory, Sultan of Turkey (Jan. 22, 1848, his first decoration from a European 
sovereign); Chevalier of the Legion of Honor, France (1856) ; Order of Dannebrog, Den- 
mark (Dec, 1856); Commander of the First Class, Order of Isabella the Catholic, Spain 
(May 11, 1859) ; Tower and Sword of Portugal (Sep. 20, 1860) ; and S. S. Maurizio et 
Lazare, Italy (March 31, 1864). For these and many more particulars see "Life of Sam- 
uel F. B. Morse, LL. D., Inventor of the Electro-Magnetic Recording Telegraph. By 
Samuel Irena-us Prime." Svo. pp. xiii + 776. Plates. N. York, 1875. 

To the Bibliography should be added the very interesting list of books given to Har- 
vard College, in 16o8, by its founder, and printed in the "Bibliographical Contributions," 
edited by Justin Winsor (No. 27, 1888). "There were evidently over 300" volumes. 
Of the titles, sixty-five per cent are Latin, and all are much abbreviated in the list, which 
is headed : " Catalogus Ubrorum quos dedit dominus Hervertus [ffarvardus] Collegii hujus 
patronus.''' 

Also, at the last moment, has appeared a work on one of the old and well-known fami- 
lies : " Memorial of James Thomjison, of Charlestown, Mass., 1630-42, and Woburn, Mass., 
1642-1682; and of Eight Generations of His Descendants. By Rev. Leander Thompson, 
A. M." 8° pp. 244 (2). 36 illustrations. Boston, 1887. 



A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 



'T^HE first lessons in local history that the writer had were 
-*- in his father's house, at what were called old ladies' par- 
ties, when several relatives, who were girls — one of them nine- 
teen years old — when the town was burned, used to spend the 
day with his grandmother. They had been intimate through 
long lives, and many a story of their early days they told. 
Memory brings back clearly that pleasant group, as they sat in 
tlieir black dresses and quaint white caps, chatting, and now 
and then having their odd little laugli that in a sunshiny way 
lighted up their then wrinkled faces. Not a word of unkindly 
gossip was heard, but they talked of things long past that they 
still well remembered, of the alarm when the British came back 
from Lexington, how women and children were rowed over 
Medford river, and how the red-coats looked in Main Street. 
What the old ladies said was undoubtedly quite as true as a 
good deal that we call history, and it was certainly much more 
interesting, — especially than some of the matter we compose 
from dry bits of record. They knew all the people, too, and 
could make them seem living if they were not. Their talk of 
them was far different from the poor little string of items and 
dates, some dubious, that forms what is called a genealogy. 
To the writer they then seemed of age beyond counting, and it 
was strange and entertaining that they could discourse in such 
ancient lore. But alas ! there was no short-hand writinor, or 
any note-taking; like their good selves, and the times and 
people they talked about, the most that they said has vanished, 
and they seem to flit by the desk where these lines are written, 

1 



2 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

and mingle with shadowy scores and hundreds who in years 
past have been guests in the old house, and fill it with associ- 
ations to be cherished in silence. 

Still, the writer's observation supplies much, and there is a 
good deal to be gleaned from written or printed statements or 
records, that, when sifted, and facts are used, and safe deduc- 
tions made, will help to a pretty full and true story. It is in- 
teresting to look at this material, to find what it amounts to, 
and, so far as we can, what the old town was just before and 
after the great fire in 1775, and then watch the growth to the 
present time. To do this, we had best at first look at the be- 
ginning of the town, and then take a somewhat careful survey 
of what there is about the ending of Provincial Charlestown. 

THE TOWN BURNED IN 1775. 

In trying to get some clear idea of the town burned by the 
British, June 17, 1775, — the first great material sacrifice of 
our countrymen in the war for our national independence, — 
the writer was at the outset led to find out what was the 
original village from which it grew, and thus to make a plan 
of it, — now the oldest part of the chief city of New England. 
In these two respects a survey of Charlestown has, as properly 
belongs to it, much more than a local interest. 

The colonists under the j\Iassachusetts Company were to be 
established on its territory. The place for the capital was 
chosen ; pioneers came to make ready for a large number of 
settlers ; and thus Charlestown was founded in 1G29, and in 
July, 1630, many hundreds of English — men, women, and chil- 
dren, — were trying to live in huts and tents on or around the 
Town Hill, at the foot of which was the Great House, shelter- 
ing the Governor and his chief associates. Changes in plans 
followed. A large part of the people went to Boston, and a 
small population remained. Who were the persons, and where 
they were in 1038, is told us, although in a puzzling way, that 
the writer has tried to make clear by fitting the parts of a very 
disjointed account on a map he has drawn for his own help, and 
has put, with explanations, in this book (p. 109}, where it may 



THE TOWN BUKNED IN 1775. 3 

be of other service. So vague are the early descriptions, and 
so imperfect the deeds remaining, that no human being can 
make the old lines exact, nor can even opinions always agree. 

When we try to understand clearly what the town was on 
the morning of that memorable day in June, 1775, we find that 
there is a mucli greater puzzle before us than we would have 
thought before we tried. Every one who knew about it died 
long ago, and what is left us in black and white on paper is 
slight, indefinite, or mixed, and requires sorting. 

Views printed or drawn, we might suppose would help us. 
If we look at those either of the town or the battle made near 
the time, we find them, nearly all, like those made by hundreds 
in England during the last century. They show certain feat- 
ures, but in a vague way, with slight regard to perspective or 
accuracy. An exceptionally good view — and it is good — is 
a sketch reproduced in the "Memorial History of Boston" 
(Vol. III.), but the scale is so small that we learn little from 
it about details of the town. An extraordinary view of the 
battle, in Cookings' " American War " (1781), re-engraved in 
much larger size in Barnard's " History of England " (1783), 
and the plate by Romans (Penn. Mag.), show a town ; but one 
as unlike Charlestown as it well could be. Indeed, of these, 
as of the few other views, we may say that we are glad we have 
even them, but that they are curiosities, now rare, rather than 
representations. 

In another art, also sometimes vividly graphic, yet often, as 
are these views, very imaginative, we find no more help, and as 
much to mislead. The poetry of the age reveals either little, 
or such a passage as this in "An Eulogium on Maj: Gen. 
Warren (1781) by a Columbian" (p. 18). 

"Amazing scene ! what sliudd'ring prospects rise! 
"What horrors glare beneath the angry skies ! 
The rapid flames o'er Charlestown's heights ascend, 
To heaven they reach ! urg'd by the boist'rous wind. 
The mournful crush of falling domes resound. 
And tott'ring spires with sparkles seek the ground. 
One gen'ral burst of ruin reigns o'er all, 
The burning city thunders to its fall ! . . . 
Beneath prodigious unextinguished iires. 
Ill-fated Charlestown welters and expires." 



4 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

In the drama of "The Battle of Bunker's-Hill " (by H. H. 
Brackenridge, 1776), we find only this allusion to the confla- 
gration (act v., sc. X.) : — 

"A town on fire, and rushing from its base, 
With ruin hideous, and combustion down." 

John Burk's "Bunker Hill, a Tragedy" (1797), omits the 
episode, and " The Fall of British Tyranny ... a Tragi-comedy 
of Five Acts" (Phila., 1776) refers to it in prose (act iii., 
sc. vii.), but shows only some of the popular feeling aroused, 
in the comments of a '■'' Neighbour. A terrible black day it was, 
and ever will be remembered by New England, when that vile 
Briton (unworthy the name of a Briton), Lord Boston [Gen. 
Gage] , (curse the name !) . . . a fratricide ! 't was he who fir'd 
Charlestown, and spread desolation, fire, flames and smoke in 
ev'ry corner ; he was the wretch, — that waster of the world, 
that licens'd robber," etc. 

In "America Invincible" (Dan vers, 1779), we find also only 
a reference, but with it an assertion of the effect of the fire on 
the provincial forces. 

"Not Charlestown' s flame that spiring high arose; 
Nor all the smoke that aided to oppose ; 
Could shake the firmness of Columbia's Band, 
To yield submissive the adjacent land." 

Rev. Robert Colvill, in his "Poetical Works" (London, 
1789), speaks of brave gentlemen who died on " the field of 
battle, before the walls of Charleftown," and Cockings, in the 
"American "War" (London, 1781), stating that his "design 
has been to relate authenticated facts," writes in this way 
(p. 17):- 

" From house to house the conflagration spread ; 
Ear-piercing shrieks ; heart-rending groans, and cries ; 
And terrifying shouts of vict'ry rise : 
Amidst the desolating wild uproar, 
Forth rushed th' inhabitants from ev'ry door. 
To sex, nor age, no place an azyle yields ; 
In crowds they ran, and sought th' adjacent fields ; 
Swifter than they, the rapid bullets flew, 
And some ill-fated persons overthrew." 



THE TOWN BURNED IN 1775. 6 

As to the " crowds," Dr. Stiles (quoted by Mr. Frothingham 
in his " Siege," p. 202) wrote that " the body of the people 
were gone," except " one hundred or two hundred, or more, 
men and women," when the battle had really begun, and Rev. 
John Martin (of R. I.), who for needed rest and refreshment 
made a brief visit to " Mr. Gary and son, still in their own 
house, . . . when a ball came through " it, says that he left for 
the Hill, and " then the town evacuated with all haste," — a 
movement about which the poet has used some license. 

At present, newspapers would contain rousing and detailed 
accounts of the fire, under a startling array of head-lines in 
assorted type. If we turn to the " Essex Gazette " (then at 
Cambridge), a leading paper, a weekly, we find in No. 360, 
June 22, on the last page, without the distinctions of large 
letters or even of italics used in the advertisements around it, 
an account of the battle, written very temperately until this 
mention is made of the fire : — 

" The Town of Charleftown, suppofed to contain about 300 
Dwelling-Houfes, a great Number of which were large and ele- 
gant, befides 150 or 200 other Buildings, are almoft all laid in 
Afhes by the Barbarity and wanton Cruelty of that infernal 
Villain, Thomas Gage." Without the slightest break by reglet 
or leading, the article ends with a notice of a marriage on " the 
6th Inftant." This, the whole account (imperfectly reproduced 
in Hist. Mag., June, 18G8, p. 375), is even more particular than 
the accounts in other papers at the time, and a notable example 
of the meagre information, or news, then supplied by the Amer- 
ican press. In the " Massachusetts Spy " (Worcester, June 21) 
is the mere mention that during the attacks on the Hill the 
town " appeared in flames in almost every quarter, supposed to 
be kindled by hot balls." The short account of the battle from 
which this extract is made is without specially distinctive 
head-lines, but it is printed in italics. In the " Boston Gazette " 
(Watertown, June 19) there is also only a brief mention of the 
fire, and other newspapers of the time elsewhere give little or 
nothing. Indeed, nowhere does there seem to be anything 
more than a general statement about the town, without details, 
affording no clear idea of its exact nature and aspect. 



6 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

In regard to the time when the fire occurred, and the way it 
was started, we are favored with not a few of the variegated 
statements out of which history often must be shaped. Along 
with them we are also told about the time when the battle was 
fought, all of which particulars may well be added in a note. 

XoTE. — The hours here refer to the movements of the British troops. 

8 a. m., says a "gentleman in Providence" (June 20), they landed, 
*' and fired the town in divers places." 

10 A. M., says Capt. Hide (" N. Y. Gazette," June 26), they "marched 
out of Boston, landed in Charles-Town, and plundering it of all its valuable 
effects, set fire to it in ten different places at once; then" began the 
battle. 

About noon, says the " Boston Gazette " (June 19), they crossed. After 
the retreat of the Provincials, they set fire to the town, "beginning with 
the Meeting-House." 

Between 12 and 1, says the Rev. Peter Thacher, an eye-witness from 
the north side of Mystic River, they were crossing. At the "instant " they 
began to move on the works, the town was seen to be on fire, set from 
some of the British "batterys." This account is followed in the state- 
ment by the Committee of Safety, Provincial Congress (July 25). 

1 p. M., says the " Essex Gazette " (June 22), they were crossing, and 
before their attack " set fire to the town." About 1 p. m., says Sam'. Paine 
(June 22), they embarked, and, at near the time of landing, "the Ships 
threw Carcasses into [the town], and in a few minutes the whole [of it] 
was in flames." Meanwhile the attack began. In a letter based on letters 
from the camp (Force IV., Hist. Mag., 375) it is stated that about 1 a. m. 
[p. M.] it was learned at Cambridge that the Regulars were landing, but 
before help could reach the works "the battle had begun in earnest;" 
also that the British troops set the town " on fire with torches." About 
1, says the Rev. Andrew Elliot, of Boston, the troops started from there; 
about 3 the battle began, and lasted perhaps an hour; and " amidst the 
carnage " the town was set on fire. 

About 2 the Br. troops embarked (" N. Y. Gazetteer," July 13) ; a large 
body suddenly crossed to C. (Prov. Congress, June 28, to Com. at Albany) ; 
they began to land ("Mass. Spy," June 21; Mass. to Cont. Congress; 
Col. Prescott, Aug. 2.")) ; 2,000 landed (Wm. Tudor, June 23) ; they landed 
(Capt. J. Choster, July 22) ; a large army landed (I. Lothrop, June 22) ; 
about 2 they began to land (Mass. Prov. Congress to Cont. Cong., June 20), 
and at 5 " were in full possession of all the posts within the [isthmus]." 

2 p. M., wi'ote Pres't Stiles, the attack was begun, and continued about 
four hours until nearly night; elsewhere also writing that the battle lasted 
three or four hours to between 5 and 6. the hottest part being from 3 to 4^. 

As to the duration of the battle, it " lasted 35 minutes with the mus- 



THE TOWN BURNED IN 1775. 7 

quetry" (says Capt. Chester, informed by a spectator "on Chelsea 
side")i it "lasted perhaps an hour" (says the Eev. A. Elliot in Boston, 
June 19); about four hours (says Dr. Stiles, Newport). As to the end, 
the Provincials retreated about 5 o'clock (says S. Gray, Roxbury, July 12) ; 
"about sunset" ("Boston Gazette," June 19) ; and the British held all 
the [peninsula] at 5 (Prov. Congress, June 20). 

Additional statements about the fire are found in several accounts. The 
" N. Y. Gazetteer " (July 13) from the Mass. Occasional Nevi'spaper, states 
that the town " was set on fire during the engagement and most part of it 
consumed," (thus confirming the Rev. A, Elliot, Mass. to Cont. Congress, 
"Mass. Spy," I. Lothrop, and S. Gray, already mentioned). That the 
fire was set before, or at the beginning of, the attack, is stated by the 
"Essex Gazette," Capt. Hide, the Rev. P. Thacher, the Com. of Safety, 
Pres't Stiles, and Gen. Dearborn. That it was set after the battle is stated 
by the "Boston Gazette," and Wm. Tudor, who says, "After they [the 
Regulars] had forc'd the Provincials from the Hill, they fir'd the Town, 
which after burning two Days, exhibit'd a scene of Ruin unparalell'd be- 
fore in America." 

Ill regard to the extent of the fire, we have a similar assort- 
ment of statements. The " Boston Gazette " says that it began 
" with the Meeting-House, and we hear tliey have not left one 
Building unconsumed." The same beginning is stated by S. 
Gray. " Charlestov/n is intirely burn't down " (adds Wm. 
Tudor, June 23). It " is now consumed to a wretched heap of 
rubbish" (adds I. Lothrop). We farther learn that the town, 
" consisting of near 500 houses and other buildings, was, by 
these bloody incendiaries set on fire and consumed to ashes " 
(Prov. Cong, to Com. at Albany) ; and that there " were three 
hundred Houses, all of which but perhaps two or three were 
reduced to Ashes & Ruins" (Stiles's Diary). "Strait before 
us," says Gen. Burgoyne (June 25), was "a large & noble 
Town in one great Blaze ; the Chh. Steeples being of Timber, 
were great Pyramids of Fire above the rest." To Great Britain 
the Provincial Congress stated (July 25) that " the Town of 
Charlestovvn, the buildings of which were in general large and 
elegant, and which contained effects belonging to the unhappy 
sufferers in Boston to a very great amount, was entirely de- 
stroyed ; and its chimneys and cellars now present a prospect 
to the Americans exciting indignation," etc. Gen. Gage, who 
probably knew as much as any one about the events, wrote 



8 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. - 

(June 26) that the town " was set on fire during the engage- 
ment and most part of it consumed." Gen. Dearborn added 
(1818) that " a very few houses escaped." 

From these statements, such as they are, it is easier to de- 
termine the course of events tlian the nature and extent of the 
town ; yet by a good deal of patience with materials that are 
described on pages 112, 113, the latter becomes clear, and the 
complete story can be briefly told. 

The American forces were entrenched on the hill by the 
monument, or variously posted along the fields to the river 
northward, or on the higher hill towards the Neck. The town 
was abandoned by the inhabitants, yet some buildings seem to 
have been used as covers by shooters more or less sharp. These 
latter fired on British troops, who, about 2 o'clock, landed along 
the shore at what is now the easterly part of the sea-front of 
the Navy Yard, or later began the battle. 

General Gage had repeatedly told the people of the town that 
he would burn it if they allowed it to be used as a base for hos- 
tilities against his forces (Frothingham's " Siege," 201), and he 
kept his word. There were reports that his troops were galled 
by firing thence, and the rebels audaciously stood on Bunker 
Hill. Accordingly shells were thrown towards the Square 
(do., 143) from a battery on Copp's Hill (Letter, June 25), and 
men from the " Somerset " frigate landed eastward, so that be- 
tween them all the town was soon, at various points, thoroughly 
in flames. The meeting-house was a conspicuous mark, and 
the conflagration may have begun there. It is, however, stated 
(1882) that buildings of Dea. Townsend, "near the foot of 
Chestnut Street and at the head of Maudlin's shipyard," were 
the first kindled. 

As to the nature and extent of the town thus set on fire, a 
clear idea can only be gained after laborious references to hun- 
dreds of details in several authorities described on pages 112, 
113, and in what proves to be a very long note (pp. 114-155) 
where the writer shows how he has come to conclusions about 
what the people left behind and the British destroyed. 

By that time the village had grown a great deal since 1638, 
but more in population and houses than in area. The three 



THE TOWN BUENED IN 1775. 9 

larger hills, of five on the peninsula where it was built, were 
still covered bj pastures or mowing lots, and dotted by trees, 
which on some of the maps are profuse. Gen. Dearborn, how- 
ever, says that there were none " except some half a dozen lo- 
custs, as many soverns, and a few apple-trees." Two or three 
huge elms, one of which is yet living, are said to have remained. 
On looking around the occupied part of the territory it would, 
so far as we can suppose or know, have been seen, if we landed 
by the ferry from Boston (at the old, or Charles River Bridge), 
that along the low shore eastward there were wharves, and 
back of them a dock extending to the present Chelsea Street. 
Around the dock were distilleries, a tan-yard, warehouses, and 
the premises of coopers, shipwrights, and others engaged in 
commerce, while among, or a little back of, them, and spread 
for perhaps a quarter of a mile, were dwellings. Directly in- 
land from the ferry, a short street, lined by shops and houses, 
led to an irregularly shaped market-place surrounded by simi- 
lar buildings. At the left, and projecting boldly into it, were 
a garden and the chief inn, " The Three Cranes," behind which 
were the homes of the two ministers. Close by the latter stood 
the Meeting-House, with a rather tall, slim steeple, and in, not 
by, the market-place (as often in old English towns), was the 
Court-House. Farther to the left, along the river-side, there 
were, as to the eastward, wharves, warehouses, a ship-chand- 
lery shop or two, and dwellings near by, as well as a distillery, 
and at a little distance farther another one. On and around 
the Town Hill, just north of the market-place, were more dwell- 
ings ; others stood about the junction of Joiner and Warren 
streets, a few by the Training-field, and at the corner of the 
lane leading to it was another distillery. Winding around the 
hill, and then for a mile northward to the Neck, was the main 
road, narrow or wide, crooked or straight, as the lay of the land 
determined. On the east side, from the market-place to the 
present Thompson Square, was a succession of houses, almost 
without a break ; for between them were only small gardens or 
areas, and three narrow lanes that led to the Back street. 
Nearly opposite the present Union Street was one more distil- 
lery, or a part of it. On the other side of the street the houses 



10 A CENTUEY OF TOWN LIFE. 

were not as closely set, and a little way above Wood Street they 
were scattered. Near the foot of Green Street stood a house 
and a barn, then there seems to have been open ground to a 
house at the corner of Hathon Place. Aside from the Main 
Street there seem to have been few houses. Beyond these 
limits, the buildings on Main Street were more separated for a 
third of a mile to a somewhat compact group, — the Mill Vil- 
lage. Beyond this, for half a mile, was land mostly open (see 
p. 152) as far as the Neck Village (pp. 152, 153). On the 
mainland along the roads to Penny ferry (Maiden bridge), to 
Medford and Cambridge, there were several houses and barns, 
and over a mile from the Neck, near Medford river, was the 
Ten Hills farm (p. 154). 

It will be observed that the buildings of the town were set 
closely along or near the sea-front from the present Navy Yard 
to the lower part of Bow Street, and in an almost unbroken 
line on Main Street to Thompson Square. A large pai't of 
them were built of wood, and among them scattered barns, 
several distilleries, and other inflammable structures. Conse- 
quently, when fires were kindled in the lower portion of the 
town, and the wind changed from southwest, as it was blowing 
(says Dearborn) to eastward, as it often does on a summer 
day, the flames were driven Icngtliwise of the town and burned 
as far as they could reach material to maintain them. Thus 
the main part of the town was easily destroyed, continuing to 
burn through the night (says H. Hulton). Some buildings, 
however, midway on Main Street (p. 149), and at the Mill Vil- 
lage (p. 151), were not reached by the fire, but guns were brought 
to rake the Neck (p. 152) and neighboring territory, and no 
little damage was done there (pp. 152-154). 

As to liow the town looked before the conflagration, we can 
form a tolerably clear idea, even in the absence of definite views 
and connected descriptions. We can feel pretty sure that, ac- 
cording to the Provincial way, English fashions were followed 
as far as means allowed, and that the town was not better than 
one in England made during the earlier half of the last century, 
when the style of building in such was plain, or at best quaint, 
and the structures apt to be small. A considerable difference 



THE TOWN BURNED IN 1775. 11 

would, of course have been made by the prevalent use of wood 
here instead of bricks. Probably some of the low, quaint houses 
left at the North End of Boston are not unlike many of those 
that were burned here. From the sizes of many lots, the length 
of time families had occupied them, or the valuations for losses, 
we are led to think that there could have been but few fine 
places. Old accounts, indeed, state that many buildings were 
" large and elegant," but definitions and ideas of elegance were 
then very different from those we have, as witness English de- 
scriptions of mutilations in English cathedrals. Two very 
detailed accounts are preserved of the houses of two prominent 
men in the town, which are given hereafter, — those of Captain 
Henley (pp. 118, 119) and B. Hurd (p. 138). 

There are several statements to show that the destruction was 
not at first complete, and that it ended by degrees. The Rev. 
Andrew Elliot says (Boston, June 19), " I suppose every dwell- 
ing-house and every public building is consumed till you have 
passed the passage to the mills, and are come to the house 
where Woods, the Baker, dwelt" (see p. 149). This refers to 
the region on Main Street north of Tliompson Square, and 
ground of some extent where the buildings were too widely 
separated for the fire to spread, and the one part of the town 
least exposed to the British guns. On the map of Page, and 
on that of De Berniere, not only are no houses marked in the 
main part of the town, but it is, in type, stated to be the part 
burned, and they are marked in this region. On the latter 
map, and on the ground just mentioned, is placed a barn (near 
the foot of Green St.), from which Americans fired on the left 
flank of the British at the final attack on the Hill, and from 
which they were driven by " part of the 47th and Marines." A 
building, without description, is marked in the same place on 
the maps of Page and of Swett. Furthermore, on the map of 
De Berniere, where houses are shown in this region, is also 
shown the position of the " 47th Regiment in Charles-town on 
the night of the 17th." It was posted for nearly half a mile 
along Main Street where guarding was, it seems, not needed 
except at the causeway, or milldam, at the further end of their 
line, but where it seems likely there were houses for shelter. 



12 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

Additional evidence in regard to the gradual destruction is 
given by a public document. At a Town meeting, Jan. 11, 
1783, a committee of seven of the inhabitants appointed to esti- 
mate the losses in the fire, reported that the greatest part of 
the town " was consumed on the first day ; the next day they 
[the British] renewed the fire, and consumed a large number 
of houses, and so continued from time to time, until the whole 
was destroyed." (Mass. Archives, 138, and Memorial, Ho. Doc, 
65, 23d Congress.) 

A number of houses even remained for six months, and a few 
for a longer time, and were used by the British, as is shown in 
a letter of Gen. Washington to Jos. Reed, Jan. 14, 1776, where 
it is stated that a few nights before (Jan. 8), " a party under 
Major Knowlton crossed upon the mill-dam [between the Am. 
station at Cobble Hill and the Mill Village described pp. 150, 
151], the night being dark, and set fire to and burnt down eight 
out of fourteen [houses] which were standing, and which we 
found they were daily pulling down for fuel." (Sparks's " Writ- 
ings," in. 241 ; also E. N. Coburn in « Charlestown," 1875.) 

About the aggregate amount of the losses no two accounts 
seem to agree. In the report of Jan. 11, 1783 (above), it is 
stated that nineteen sworn appraisers made the sum total 
£117,675. 14s. According to the Archives (pp. 157-174), it 
was £123,444. 8. 6. In pencil on the MS., by a later hand, is 
Total, £117,982. 5. 2d., the figures given by Mr. Frothingham 
("Siege," 203). On the Church Record (heliotyped in the 
writer's 4° vol.) is an entry stating that " 380 dwelling-houses 
and other buildings, valued at £156,966. 18. 8d., were con- 
sumed, and 2,000 persons reduced from affluence & mediocrity 
to the most aggravated exile." As to the number of buildings, 
tlierc is a still greater diversity of statement. It is even difii- 
cult to obtain exact figures of the latter from the papers writ- 
ten by the sufferers themselves when reporting to the committee, 
as buildings may be counted different ways, and in several 
cases fractions are given. No total "footings" appear with 
these, but the writer counts from them, with at least approxi- 
mate exactness, 232 dwellings, 95 barns, 76 shops or stores, 
25 warehouses, 12 mills, and 81 miscellaneous buildings, besides 



THE TOWN BURNED IN 1775, 13 

17 wharves, and 205 claims for personal losses only, making 
521 buildings, owned by nearly 500 persons, or about 700 suf- 
ferers, a majority of whom represented families, so that it is 
easy to see that fully " 2,000 persons " were immediately and 
severely affected. Of individuals or families (including all of 
a name) meeting with losses, 42 lost between <£700. and .£1,000., 
and 27 above the latter amount, as may be counted. Ten sums 
at least were over <£2,000. : Russells, X5,955. ; Henley (S.), 
£1,9-41.; Rands, ^3,788.; Frotliinghams, £3,353.; Harrises, 
X3,192. ; Austins, X3,159. ; Woods, £3,011. ; Cheevers, £2,491. ; 
Carys, £2,252.; and Fosters, £2,063. 

For a month or more before the battle it seems to have been 
felt that property was very unsafe on the peninsula, conse- 
quently much of the more portable kinds was hidden or re- 
moved. Yet the losses were extremely severe, for houses, 
stores, workshops, barns, and many other things must remain 
on the spot. After all the efforts that were made to save per- 
sonal estate, the amount destroyed was important enough to 
seriously affect business and domestic life, to ruin many of the 
people, and to cripple a greater number. No more interesting 
and pathetic evidence of the condition and trials of the inhab- 
itants is to be found than in the collection of statements (443) 
of individual losses preserved among the Town Records ; in- 
deed, it may be, no other town of the Revolutionary period has 
such a full and touching exhibit of whom and what its people 
were, and of what they suffered in the cause of country and 
independence. He or she must be a cold-blooded and heartless 
American who can look over these worn or time-stained papers 
without emotion, and without appreciating the situation and 
feelings of the persons who wrote them. Generally it is simply 
stated that the buildings and effects were lost by the military 
operations, by the acts of the " Regulars," or the " King's troops," 
yet, now and then, the provocation was too strong for calm 
mention of the agents of destruction, and they are referred to 
as the " ministerial Butchers." Charlestown had slight cause 
to speak otherwise of the representatives of the " mother coun- 
try " — anything but an " alma mater " — across the sea. 

So far as we can judge from these statements, most of the 



14 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

silver ware was remored, for little is mentioned. Specifica- 
tions of the quality of furniture are so generally made that we 
can tell closely who had the finer kinds and how much they 
had. Of about 450 families or persons claimants, 43 had ma- 
hogany (in all, 64 tables, 23 chairs, 12 desks, 29 teaboards, 
3 cases drawers, 9 sundry articles), and 53 had black walnut fur- 
niture ; 40 lost books (£30. old tenor being the largest single 
claim, and there being no evidence of anything like a library), 
and 26 had pictures (EUery, Russell, and Sheafe lost the chief, 
but none are costly, and 119 averaged only 3s. 3d. each in the 
owner's valuations). Chests of drawers (now in great request) 
were not uncommon, and were among the best articles of fur- 
niture. Spinning-wheels and pewter plates were rather numer- 
ous ; there were fewer warming-pans, and few clocks ; there 
was not much liquor, but there were many cider barrels, and 
barrels of soap. A majority of claimants on loss of personal 
property reported kitchen furniture, as that would be among 
the things least likely to be removed. Small articles of this 
kind, as well as tools, and indeed of all sorts are often described 
with great detail. (See Note, p. xiv.) 

The people who bore these losses were, moreover, scattered 
widely to find refuge, and some were never to return. Public 
or private help for current necessities was given, but there was 
slight insurance, and full, or even partial, remuneration was 
never obtained. (See p. 22.) Charlestown, it might be fairly 
said, was unanimously rebel, or patriot; for there was only one 
resident loyalist, Thos. Danforth, who was also the solitary 
lawyer in the place. One other of his party, Thos. Flucker, 
owned land (Plan III. 84), but lived in Boston. The people 
proved their patriotism and took the consequences, — they were 
left with honest hearts, clear consciences, and depleted pocket- 
books. Yet, while the majority were financially crippled, or 
ruined, their sacrifice — for they had shunned no risk — was 
perhaps the strongest possible means for rousing their country- 
men to the struggle for national existence. Certainly to this 
end they did their full part. 

While what they w'ere in politics, they were almost as unani- 
mously Congregationalists in religion, and with few exceptions 



THE REBUILDING OF THE TOWN. 15 

En""Iisli in origin. Socially they were rather more diversified. 
There was little of the old tory official or fashionable element, 
only a moderate amount of higher education, and there were 
few or none of the leisure class, as it is called. Apart from a 
few persons engaged in commerce, the richest were the distil- 
lers ; next were the bakers ; both of their kinds of business 
seeming to have been among the necessities. The general 
community was intelligent, thrifty, comfortable ; it was orderly 
and quiet, yet it probably enjoyed itself, although in ways that 
might now appear simple. Going to meeting on Sunday was 
much more common ; there were no comic operas, or " sacred " 
concerts ; schools were kept at small cost ; scholars were not 
crammed with scraps of arts and ologies ; nearly every one 
could read and write, although, as appears from the statements 
of losses, spelling by nearly all was eccentric, or, it might be 
said, incorrect. Neither literature, cooking, nor amusements 
were varied, yet there was a generation of good citizens, fond 
of old homes, and devoted to country. 

Great sufferers in the struggle for the independence of their 
native land, they were in some degree exiles awhile, then, as 
best they could, some of them sought their old familiar haunts. 

THE REBUILDING OF THE TOWN. 

In 1777, as is stated in the Records of the First Parish, the 
few who began to return to the town found " in their then dis- 
tressed situations " no better place for public worship or meet- 
ings, for a schoolroom, as well as " for other necessary purposes," 
than " an old Block House [on the present site of the First 
Church] left by the British army in 1776. . . . There . . . united 
by a recollection of their mutual sufferings, and a respect for 
their venerable pastor," they " attended with grateful emotions 
the public services of religion," and there, probably, " the first 
administration of the Lord's Supper [says Mr. Prentice] in 
Charlestown since the destruction of the cruellest British Ene- 
mies, was Nov. 8, 1778, with great solemnity and fulness of 
members beyond expectation" (Ch. Rec, 1778). There also, 
" uninfluenced by political dissensions," says one of them. Dr. 



16 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

Bartlctt (1813), "we gave our first suffrages (Sep. 4,17,80) 
. . . under the constitution of this Commonwealth ; when . . . 
we exulted in the commencement of a government, acchieved by 
our ablest statesmen." There were forty-eight votes cast. 
These, and other particulars show that some of the people 
began at an early date after the departure of the Royal forces 
(Mcli., 1776) to return, and " to repair their waste places. A 
few of the number were able to erect convenient dwellings, 
whilst others, like their hardy predecessors, were only covered 
with temporary shelters" (Dr. Bartlett, 1813). That a few, 
at least, of some sort, were soon provided, is shown by the fact, 
although statements of it differ, that in Nov. 1776, Susanna 
Hooper was the first child, and Feb. 24, 1777, Tim° Thompson, 
Jr., was the first male, born on the peninsula after the return. 

In regard to the first dwelling erected, there are also differ- 
ent statements (pp. 144 and 149), and it is probable that sev- 
eral were begun or finished at about the same time. It was 
not, however, until the end of active warfare that a general 
movement seems to have been made to rebuild, when there was 
no longer risk of exposure to armed vessels, that in 1775 had 
given the townspeople such a dismal experience. 

Meanwhile the affairs of local government were duly attended 
to ; town meetings were held, some of the time at Anna Whit- 
temore's Inn, and officers were chosen. On June 20, 1780, at 
one of these meetings, it was voted " that all streets, lanes, etc., 
within the neck shall be laid open from the first day of May 
next" (1781). In this latter year Acts of tlie Legislature 
were obtained "for the better Regulation of the Ferry" to Bos- 
ton (May 16), and (Oct. 30) "for widening and amending the 
Streets, Lanes, and Squares, in that part of the Town which 
was lately laid waste by Fire." The latter Act was supple- 
mented by another, in 1790, " for the Relief of the Town," by 
extending time allowed for raising money by Lottery to pay 
for these improvements, the chief of which were in clearing ♦ 
the market-place of a block (Plan I., 1) covered with ruins, 
in forming Water, Henley, and the lower part of Warren streets 
from crooked lanes, and in removing some irregularities from 
Main Street (Plan III.). No map of any fulness or correct- 



THE REBUILDING OF THE TOWN. 17 

ncss remains, or, it may be, ever was made ; but an account of 
such sketches as there are is given in the survey of the town 
(p. 112). 

New public buildings became necessary, and another site for 
the meeti7ig-house, the former one on the Square having been 
appropriated by the Town. Consequently, Sep. 10, 1781, a vote 
was passed " to choose a committee to solicit subscriptions of 
the good friends of the town throughout the state, to assist in 
building a meeting-house," and Oct. 27, 1782, " after much de- 
bate " a " resolution ^ was come into " about the position of the 
edifice, to be the one place of worship in the town, a place of 
which it was then destitute. In the next year the house was 
raised and opened for use, but it had temporary seats and an 
unfinished steeple until 1787. Descriptions of it, and of its 
successor, will be found in a chapter on the meeting-houses. 

The school had temporary quarters until 1786, when it was 
voted in Town meeting to sell the old sehoolhouse and build a 
new one, for which XIOO. were to be raised. Other public in- 
stitutions were provided for even earlier, as March 4, 1782, it 
was voted to build a Worhhouse for the poor, and, in 1784, to 
have a pair of stocks made. The ferry to Boston was main- 
tained by twelve men with four boats plying, March to October 
from sunrise till nine in the evening, and during the other 
months until eight. In Sep., 1783, the Warren Tavern (Plan 
III., 72) was already occupied, and there, during the autumn, 
the first Itlasonic Lodge, King Solomon's, was fully organized. 

By this time a considerable number of the older inhabitants 
had diuelUngs, and by the end of 1785 there were 279 buildings 

^ " WiiEKEAs by tlie destruction of a great part of this town in the year 1775, the 
inhahitauts of the first parish were very great sufferers, and the house for public 
worship in said parish, as well as the dwellings of said inhabitants, were destroyed 
by fire, and as the afl'ections of kindness and brotherly love are amongst the bright- 
est ornaments of human nature, and as it is in the power of the town without any 
injury to the general interests thereof, to furnish said parish with a place on which 
to erect a building for the public worship of God. Therefore this town, acting on 
the principle and reasons above mentioned, do hereby vote to grant and do grant, 
convey and relinquish to the first parish in this town, that piece of land commonly 
called Town House Hill, for the sole purpose of erecting thereon a house for the 
public worship of God. Provided said parish building be erected thereon within 
the space of five years, otherwise this grant to be void." 



18 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

in the town (Am. Rec, No. 1), of which 91 houses, 22 stores 
and workshops, and 38 barns were in the " 1st division," and 
69, 9, and 50, respectively, in the second. In the former there 
were also 550 inhabitants (537 whites, 13 blacks) and 141 
ratable polls, and in the latter 449 (441 whites, 8 blacks) and 
103 polls. 

Another important work, that was of a public as well as pri- 
vate nature, was also undertaken, when, after deliberation and 
meetings, eighty-nine gentlemen were organized as a corpora- 
tion for building, and for supporting during forty years, a 
bridge to Boston on the line of the old ferry, an Act to that 
effect having been passed by the Legislature, March 9, 1785.^ 
At the close of the year, a newspaper, the only one then pub- 
lished in Middlesex County, was first issued (Dec. 9, 1785), 
although the proprietors stated that " their number of subscrip- 
tions was considerably less than what was thought necessary " 
for advantageously beginning the work.^ In the first and sec- 
ond numbers a townsman (Dr. Bartlett) gave an authentic 
account of the existing condition of the place. There were, 
generally much altered since 1775, 18 " lanes and allies," and 
11 streets, the principal of which were paved with beach stones. 
Of wharves there were 13, " where vessels may unlade," and 
there was also " an excellent yard for shipbuilding." Before 
the war the latter industry had flourished, as well as the man- 
ufacture of " rum, loaf sugar, candles, and potashes, the last 
of which only " had " then revived." Shade trees and orchards 
had been set out in place of others destroyed in 1775. There 
was only one militia company (the Charlestown Artillery, organ- 
ized in 1786), while of the three public schools (2 above and 1 

* The corporators were Jehu Hancock, Thos. Russell, Nath', Gorham, James 
Swan, and Eben Parsons, — a list short but notable. 

2 Of this paper 110 numbers (13i X ^i in., pp. 4) were issued, ending May 25, 
1787, on account of insufficient support. Of advertisements. No. 1 contains one by 
the publishers, another from Boston, and none from Charlestown; in No. 2 one 
more from Boston is added to these ; in No. 4 all had disappeared ; and in No. 5 is 
a lament over the " enormous tax " imposed by Government on advertising. The 
State had early learned the art of killing business by taxation, an art in which it 
has at times been very proficient. No. 6, p. 4, contains, for the first time, much 
larger t3rpe, in which an account is given of Courtships in Kamtschatka. 



THE EEBUILDING OF THE TOWN. 19 

below the Neck) it was said that " neither merited particular 
description." Prospects, however, were encouraging, as the 
article closes with the statement that " the flourishing state of 
the peninsula . . . affords a pleasing presage of wealth and 
prosperity." 

On the 17th of June, 1786, occurred the first celebration of 
the anniversary of the battle on Bunker's Hill, conducted " witli 
the greatest splendor and festivity," says Dr. Bartlett. A devas- 
tating trial by war only eleven years before, was commemorated 
by a great and beneficial triumph of peace. Charles River 
Bridge was opened,^ for the first time affording a roadway to 
Boston, or across the waters that nearly environed the most 
populous section of the town. Compared with similar struct- 
ures in many older countries, it was a simple and insubstantial 
work ; compared with the means of the builders and like things 
then in their country, it was " considered as the greatest," and 
was immense. The project had been first discussed as early 
as 1720, but without any such results until this time, when its 
success led to the construction of a bridge to Maiden, opened 
1787, and another, to Chelsea, built in 1803. These new and 
important means for communication were of great benefit.^ 



1 The opening "summoned from all parts upwards of 20,000 spectators. The 
morn was ushered in by a discharge of thirteen cannon from the opposite heights of 
Breed's Hill, Charlestown, and Cop's Hill, Boston, accompanied by repeated peals 
from the bells of Christ Church. At one p. m. the proprietors assembled in the 
State House for the purpose of waiting on the different branches of the legislature 
over the bridge. The procession consisted of almost every respectable character in 
public and private life, . . . and upon their arrival at the entrance of the bridge, 
the attendant companies of artillery and artificers formed two lines on the right and 
left of the proprietors, and moved on to the centre of the bridge, when the Presi- 
dent of the proprietary advanced alone and gave orders to Mr. Cox, the master 
workman, to fix the drawer for the passage of the company, which was immediately 
done. At this moment 13 cannon were fired from Cop's Hill, and the procession 
passed forward, attended by the loudest shouts of acclamation." On Breed's Hill 
800 persons dined, "spent the day in sober festivity," and " separated at 6 o'clock." 
(Mass. Mag., Sep., 1789.) Eighty-nine persons held the 150 shares of £100. each, 
that Oct. 4, 1823, were quoted $1,550. Dividends were paid for 40 years, the 
length of the grant. 

2 Particulars about these bridges are gathered here from several sources. Charles 
River was, in all, 1,503 feet long, 42 wide, had 75 piers each of 7 piles, and 40 
lamps, and cost £15,000. — Maiden, 2,005 long, 32 wide, had 100 piers each of 6 



20 A CENTURY OF TOWX LIFE. 

Before the Revolution a few printing establishments were 
quite sufficient for the needs of New England. Most of the 
important books could be advantageously supplied from the 
mother country, while native works were not numerous enough 
to give adequate business to many presses. After Independence 
local demands increased, and distant relations were changed. 
Presses were established in an almost surprising number of 
places where they were novelties, and a great deal of what is 
termed job-work was done on them, as well as what was called 
for in their neighborhoods. In Charlestown, a growing place, 
there was naturally a press set up, and about three months 
after the first newspaper was issued from it, appeared the first 
work (Bib., p. 32) in book or pamphlet form printed there (so 
far as the writer has found). It was the Oration delivered by 
Dr. Bartlett at the Dedication of Warren Hall (p. 135), March 
14, 1786, by which it was incidentally shown that the popula- 
tion had already become large enough to make a hall wanted. 
This one was finished by Feb. 10, 1786. 

As had been the case from the beginning, the townspeople, 
with few exceptions, continued to unite in the support of a 
single religious organization. After the death (June 17, 1782) 
of their aged pastor, the Rev. Thos. Prentice, the pulpit was sup- 
plied " by the kind assistance of the neighboring ministers," 
until Jan. 1787, when the Rev. Joshua Paine was ordained. He 
was highly esteemed, but died of consumption at the age of 24, 
on the 27th of Feb., 1788. On the 30th of April, 1789, the Rev. 
Jcdidiah Morse was installed pastor. For twelve years he was 
the one settled minister of the town, and for thirty years and 
ten months officiated in the First Church ; consequently it is 
of interest to learn the characteristics of the man thus chosen. 
Descended in the fifth generation from Anthony Morse, of 
Marlborough, Wilts, and born (Aug. 23, 1761) at Woodstock, 
Conn., he became a very prominent clergyman, and the most 
voluminous author who has lived in the town. Besides more 

piles, and 8 lamps, and cost £5,000. — Chelsea, 32 wide, cost $53,000. — Warren 
(built 182S) was, in all, 1,300 long, and 44 wide. — Prison Point was built in 1820, 
and led to East Cambridge. — Essex, at Salem, considered a marvel at the time, was 
built in 1792, and was 1,080 long, and 34 wide. 



THE REBUILDING OF THE TOWN. 21 

than twenty pamphlets, some of them large and important, he 
■wrote valuable geographical and historical works, that in all 
their editions (see p. 297) number over seventy volumes, chiefly 
in octavo, put beside which the productions of some who be- 
came his not unassuming opponents look indeed insignificant. 
One who thoroughly knew him says that he had a " tall, slen- 
der form. The well-shaped head, a little bald, but covered 
thinly with fine silken powdered hair, falling gracefully into 
curl, gave him, when only middle-aged, a venerable aspect, 
while the benignant expression of his whole countenance, and 
especially of his bright, speaking eye, won for him at first sight 
respect and love." His "freedom from every offensive habit, 
his neat dress, polished manners," avoidance of " every Avord 
and look that miglit wound the feelings of another, ... in 
short, his true Christian gentlemanliness, . . . gave him a 
deep hold on . . . the religious community." (Prof. M. in 
" Sprague's Life," pp. 281, 282.) His ability and character 
during life were also demonstrated in his sons, men such as 
come of no inferior stock. He lived here at a period of ex- 
citement and trial, when he was sharply attacked. Partisan- 
ship, some of it shown by persons far his inferiors, assailed 
him. He and his outlived it. Small help to them, but much 
honor to the place, that they lived here ; Charlestown can ill 
afford a slur on Jedidiah Morse, it can far better afford him 
a statue. 

When he was installed there were, as he recorded, 135 church 
members, 92 of whom were females (40 married, 12 single, and 
the remarkably large number of 40 widows). His salary, said 
to have been exceptionally good, was $572, besides firewood and 
the use of a parsonage. 

Further evidence of the small scale of expenditures is shown 
by the appropriations for civil affairs. For schools the town 
voted £150.; for highways, £90.; for support of the poor, 
£200. ; while for Town Clerk (Sam! Pay son), for Treasurer 
(Eben' Breed), and for Sexton the salary was £10. each.^ At 

1 In this year (Apr. 6, 1789) the Selectmen, who were also the School Commit- 
tee, were Isaac Mallet, Sr., Nathl Hawkins, Josiah Bartlett, Esq., Caleb Swan, 
Sani^ Swan, Esq., Benj. Hard, Seth Wyman. There were two constables (Eleazer 



22 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

.the same time (Sep. 7) ten innholders and fifteen retailers 
were "approbated." Besides these facts we also learn from 
the records of the town that its financial condition was not as 
easy as could be wished, and that measures for offsetting the 
losses by the war had not been successful. Some public and 
private aid had been extended to support individuals, chiefly 
aged or infirm, " and the state taxes were remitted for seven 
years" (Dr. B.). The only other help was a lottery author- 
ized for raising funds to alter the streets. Even of this the 
committee on it reported, June 19, 1789, " that the rapid de- 
preciation of the Continental Currency [had] deprived the town 
of any Benefit from the three classes which [had] been drawn ; " 
indeed, there was not enough obtained to compensate the man- 
agers for their services. The two most prominent inhabitants 
— Hon. N. Gorham and Hon. T. Russell — had been appointed 
as early as 1777 to ask relief from Congress, but it could give 
none ; and in 1784 the former was, against the wish of many, 
sent to England for aid, that was also there sought in vain. 
To complete the account of efforts made and failure met in the 
same purpose, it may be added that as long afterwards as 1834, 
Congress received a memorial of the citizens praying compen- 
sation, and let them have their labor for their pains taken. 

Charlestown was allowed the American privilege, a chance 
to pay its own bills and to make its own way. It did both, and 
we can look along its history and see how it turned out in life. 

THE NEW TOWN. 

In Feb., 1789, a census ^ was taken by which the condition of 
the town was, to some extent, shown, and from which some 

"Wj'er and Sam. Kent), and nineteen other descriptions of officers, making in all 
fully seventj' office-holders. 

A list of the town clerks maj' be added here. They were "Walter Russell, 1778 ; 
Sami. Swan, 1779, 1782; Timothy Trumhall, 1780; Saml Holbrook, 1783; Sam'. 
Payson, 1787; Philips Payson, 1801; John Kettell, 1806, 1813, 1818; Saml Dev- 
ens, 1812; David Dodge, 1814, and lS2,')-47 ; Sam'. Devens, 1822. (See "Mem. 
Hist. Boston," III.) 

1 The orijrinal list taken "liy S. Swan, Jun', Esq., and B. Hurd, Jun^" is on 
56 double pa;;cs of a book, about 8 X 6| in., in rather small-sized writing, some- 



THE NEW TOWN. 23 

curious particulars are derived. On computation by the writer 
it appears that there were 8G7 males, and 812 females, or a 
total of 1579, of which 744 were adults, 820 children, and 15 
uncertain. Of adults with children, there were 175 married 
couples, 23 widowers, 37 widows ; of those without children, 
there were 81 men and 99 women, single. Of persons called 
servants there were 40 males, 34 females, and 2 uncertain. 
Among 454 families and single persons, 67 had servants, and 
of these Sam? Ireland had 4, Benj. Frothingham and Daniel 
Reed each had 3, and nine had 2 each. Several of the older or 
prominent inhabitants had none, as was the case with Dr. J. 
Bartlett, Geo. Bartlett, Benj. Hurd (Sr. and Jr.), and Hon. 
Nath! Gorham (with eight children), while others had but one, 
as had Hon. Jas. Russell, Matthew Bridge, Sam. Swan, Wm. 
Hunnewell, Sam. Henley, NathI Austin, and others. Evidently 
there was a very simple style of living, and the women who 
were heads of families had not the many and engrossing calls 
upon their time and strength now made ; yet the minor cares 
of daily life, and the exceptional labors attendant on the re- 
establishment of homes and town, must have been trying. There 
seems to have been no excess of amusement, but, very likely, a 
fair amount of quiet family or neighborly visiting. Travelling 
was slow and expensive. Immigration was from places at no 
great distance, and scarcely any of it was foreign. Some per- 
sons or families during and after the war removed to what 
were then remote and newer regions, such as southern New 
Hampshire and eastern New York, going in the saddle over 
imperfect roads, in a way more adventurous than removals are 
now, even to the far Northwest or California. While these 
sought new homes, the majority returned to the old ; and while 
some recovered former prosperity, others were seriously affected. 

times so cramped that words are indistinct. It is interesting to find, as below, the 
increase of population by persons from other towns who were not inhabitants in 
1775. In 1776 and 1777 none are marked as coming. Afterwards the numbers are 
as follows : 1778, of men 1, women 1, children 4, total 6. —1779, 1 -f- -f- 4 = 5. 

— 17S0, 14-2-1-5 = 8.— 1781, 3 -f- -1- = 3.— 1782, 3 -I- 4 -f- 15 = 22. — 
1783, 9 -h 8 H- 25 = 42. —1784, 10 -H 6 -H 6 = 22. —1785, 12 H-12 + 23 = 47. 

— 1786, 20 -I- 2H- 49 = 90. — 1787, 12 4- 7 -h 23 = 42. — 1788, 22 -1- 19 -+- 
26 = 67. —1789, 27 -+- 25 -{- 41 = 93. In twelve years, 121 men, 105 women, 
221 children, a tot-al of 447 persons. 



24 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

The growth of the town during the ensuing years was con- 
stant, as it has been shown to have already been, — a fact ap- 
parent in figures at several dates that can be advantageously 
seen together. In 1775 there were 380 buildings on the penin- 
sula (Ch. Rcc.) ; in 1785 there were 151 on it, and 279 in the 
whole town, and the population was 999 (Am. Recorder) ; four 
years later it was 1,579 (census). The natural increase, 1790-96, 
is shown by the Church Record (p. 255). In 1800 the town 
contained 349 buildings, and 2,751 inhabitants (Morse), and 
in 1805 about 400 buildings on the peninsula, and about 2,800 
inhabitants. The latter in 1810 were 4,736 (Dr. B.) ; in 1834 
about 10,000 (Directory) ; in 1840, 10,872 ; in 1850, 15,933 ; 
in 1855, 21,742; in 1865, 26,398; in 1870, 28,323; in 1885, 
37,673 (the last six by census). 

After observing as we have the start of the renewed town, 
we can perhaps most clearly understand its development in dif- 
ferent ways by following separately its religious, political, 
and business history through its first half-century, then through 
its second, and afterwards looking at various buildings, all in 
some degree indicative of that history, and of the thought, con- 
dition, and life of the people. 



RELIGIOUS HISTORY. 1783-1834. 

During the earlier part, perhaps half, of this period, the old 
order in matters of faith continued sul^stantially as it had from 
the beginning of the town, that is, with one church, ministry, 
and creed, — the Trinitarian Congregational; of which from 
1789 to 1819 there was one minister. Dr. Morse. The changes 
in opinion or belief that arose in the new nation, however, soon 
became marked in religion. 

In 1801 the Baptists ^ withdrew or organized, but their num- 
bers, at first only eleven, were for some time small, and no 
great general change at an early date occurred. They, however, 

1 The ministers (ISOl-HC) were the Rev. Thomas "Waterman, ins. Oct. 7, 1802, 
to June, 1803 ; the Rev. Wm. Collier, ins. May 3, 1S04, resigned Aug. 20, 1819 ; 
the Rev. Henry Jackson, ord. Nov. 27, 1822, res. Oct., 1836. 



RELIGIOUS HISTORY. 1783-1834. 25 

increased, then decreased awhile, until, during the ministry of 
the Rev. Henry Jackson (1822-36), revivals were frequent, and 
there were large additions to the membership. Besides paying 
its expenses, the society raised annually " an average of more 
than a thousand dollars " for general religious and benevolent 
purposes. At the beginning of his ministry there were 79 
members, and during it a net increase of 206. Under the 
auspices of the society, the Charlestown Female Seminary, long 
an excellent school, was instituted in 1831 (Hist. Ch., 1852). 

The Congregationalists continued (at least until 1810) to 
include a very large part of the townspeople. Of church mem- 
bers there were in 1789, 135 (43 m., 92 f.) ; in 1800, 143 (28 m., 
115 f.); in 1806 (June 10), 235 (64 m., 171 f.). Thence to 
the end of 1818 the admissions to the First Church were 166 
(36 m., 130 f.). Temporal, in distinction from religious, affairs 
were, before the Revolution, managed in the town-meetings, 
but not long after that time a separation of religious and secu- 
lar concerns took place. The former were acted on in the 
meeting-house, and for their better management the pew-holders 
were incorporated as the First Parish in 1803, when there were 
238 members. To this arrangement there was opposition that 
expressed itself to the Legislature in 1812 by a remonstrance 
signed by 76 persons, and thus apparently formidable ; but of 
the names, 43 represented members of other societies, and 9 
were of minors (Par. Rec, 168). A result was an additional 
and amendatory Act (1812), making the proprietors of pews 
solely voters, liable for parish taxes, to which right no member 
of another religious society was entitled. 

Meanwhile tlie First Uiiiversalist Society^ (the third promi- 
nent church in the town) was formed (1810) and incorporated 
(1811). Frothingham, Harris, Rand, Wood, and other names 
of old resident families were represented, yet the society in- 
cluded many of the increasing newer population of the town, 
and a noticeable proportion of the younger people. The meet- 
ing-house erected (1810) by this society (p. 56) shows to our 

1 The ministers to 1836 were the Reverends Abner Kneeland, 1811-14 ; Edward 
Turner, 1814-25; Calvin Gardner, 1825-27; J. S. Thompson, 1827-29; L. S. 
Everett, 1829-36. 



26 A CEXTUHY OF TOWN LIFE. 

day (1887) that it had enterprise and a fair degree of wealth. 
Continuously, also, it has represented itself by some of the 
most distinguished ministers of its denomination, the Rev. Ed- 
ward Turner (1814-25), the Rev. E. H. Chapin, D. D. (1840- 
46), the Rev. Thomas Starr King (1846-49), and the Rev. C. 
F. Lee (now pastor), all of whom have been well known offi- 
cially and as writers. 

During the political agitation that prevailed through tlie coun- 
try in the latter part of the last century, and for some time 
into the present, the townspeople became divided. With simi- 
lar vigor differing religious opinions were held, and a memo- 
rable rupture among the Congregationalists ensued here, as in 
Boston and its vicinity. Long before the crisis, however, there 
was such a lack of harmony that Dr. Morse (Nov. 12, 1802), 
" after prayerful consideration," submitted to the church the 
question, " whether it be not expedient that the Pastoral rela- 
tion between us be dissolved ? " This was voted on, and unani- 
mously answered in the negative. He gave a fair opportunity 
to some who had known him for years, and who afterwards 
strongly opposed him. There was soon, notwithstanding, 
trouble about his salary, — then settled (1803) at $972 cash, 
20 cords of wood, valued at 8120, and rent of the parsonage at 
$300. It may be added that the salary of the organist at that 
time was $80. Still, it was stated (Jan. 6, 1804) that men of 
eminent " respectability, influence, and standing," refused to 
pay their part " unless compelled by Law." Lideed, there ap- 
pears reason for thinkirig that tlie Parish Committee knew 
what it was reporting when it declared (1812) that "disagree- 
ments and altercations had arisen to such a state " (1797) that 
" most of the business was disposed of in an unprecedented 
maner \_sic], and happy would it have been" if any plan 
" could have destroyed the demon of discord." Even " time, 
the common antidote of contention," did not produce its " usual 
effect," and then (1812) " the embers of discord [were] again 
bursting to a flame." When in addition to such differences 
about temporal affairs, grave diversity of religious belief was 
developed, a separation occurred. A unit}^ in faith, not seri- 
ously disturbed for a century and three quarters from the set- 



RELIGIOUS HISTOEY. 1783-1834. 27 

tlement of the town, was broken. Theological characteristics 
of the two parties thus existing are well known and need not 
be described here ; but it is of interest to observe how, at this 
important point, the people immediately and subsequently be- 
came grouped. As under the institutions of the country, the 
majority ruled. Possession of the ancient organization, of the 
meeting-house, and of other church property remained with 
the Trinitarians, who numbered at least seven out of eight, 
probably a larger proportion of the church members, and a 
conclusive majority of the parishioners.^ At first the old 
church lost about one quarter of its income by the- departures 
to the newer, but in nine months it gained 83 communicants, 
five times as many as had thus gone.^ Through the period of 
the division there appears to have been temperate and honor- 
able action on both sides. The record of the First Church is 

1 The Parish Committee at this period consisted (1815) of Tim? Walker, Isaac 
Warren (1815-18), Amos Tufts (1815-18), Matthew Skilton (also 1818), David 
Stetson, John Soley, Tlios. Osgood. In 1816-17, Asher Adams, Jas. Warren, and 
Sam'. Kidder replaced four, and in 1817-18, Tlios. Kettell and Oliver Jaquith re- 
placed the last two named. The Deacons, all of whom remained in the First Church, 
were Thos. Miller (chosen 1787, died 1832, aged 85), James Frothiugham (do., 
1793-1820, £6. 85), Amos Tufts (do., 1804-39, a;. 77). 

2 The division extended to families, and social or other than theological causes 
had an effect, yet relationship or intimacies helped to keep some together. Politics 
were so strongly felt that they may have had some influence. It was a period of 
changes in most things. Many of the old resident families had gone or were les- 
sened in members. The Russclls, for instance, were represented in name by one 
maiden lady, and the Gorhams by a single man (much of his life not a householder). 
Bradstreets, Devenses, Frothinghams, and others were on both sides; indeed, on 
both there were good and valuable people, and of them and their successors, in each 
faith, the writer has known and esteemed so many that he prefers to pleasantly re- 
member, rather than to analyze them. Yet it may be added that of the larger prop- 
erties, most of them then newly acquired, a good deal was represented in the newer 
church, as also was social prominence, and a good share of the moderate number of 
persons in town who had a collegiate education, or that acquired by any wide study 
of the world. In the older remained the two men of intellect since most widely 
known, and from it date two others, authors, Morse and Devens, whose works have 
had by far the greatest circulation of any by residents or natives. While composed 
as the second church was of all classes, and of older and newer residents, it was for 
years the more fashionable ; at the same time the first held by far the larger number 
of communicants. For perhaps twenty j'ears the numbers of the two were nearly 
equal ; afterwards the Trinitarians largely increased in this way as well as in 
expenditures (see p. 39). 



28 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

dispassionate and dignified, and avoids partisan expressions. 
Neither side had a monopoly of the graces, or of liberality, and 
no history of the town, or of the good works done in it, is 
complete without an expression of the valuable labors of both 
branches of the Congregationalists. 

More of the history of the First Church need not be given 
here, as it is sketched on pages 175 to 191, and an account of 
its meeting-houses appears in the section relating to such 
buildings. 

In 1819 the Unitarians'^ erected a meeting-house (p. 56) 
that is to-day (1887) a proof of their early abilities and of their 
long devotion. Their organization, building, their good works 
in benevolence, and many of their efforts to animate social life 
around them have been honorable to themselves and to their 
denomination. 

In 1833 a division occurred in organization, but not in faith, 
among the Trinitarians. The Winthrop Society^ with 44 mem- 
bers, was incorporated, and the Rev. D. Crosby was installed 
August 14th as its pastor (dismissed May 18, 1842). While 
the older church did not at first recognize the necessity of the 
division, it proved an event that must have come in time, for 
not long after it, two meeting-houses were absolutely necessary 
to accommodate attendants. Almost simultaneously the two 
societies built brick meeting-houses (pp. 53, 58). 

The 3Iethodists^ beginning with moderate numbers, and in- 
corporated in 1820, were also destined to increase very much 
in the next half-century. While their first minister, the Rev. 
Wilbur Fisk, was with them only a short time, as is usual in 
their organization, he was prominent in it, and was able to give 
them a good start. lie afterwards became President (1830-39) 
of the Wcsleyan University at Middletown, Conn. 

In religious affairs the effect of the freedom obtained by the 

^ The ministers were the Rev. Thomas Prentiss, ordained ilarch 26, 1817, and 
the Rev. James Walker, D.D., ord. April 15, 1818, who resigned July 14, 1839. 

2 The ministers were the Reverends Wilbur Fisk, D.D., 1820-21; Daniel Fil- 
more, 1822-23; Bartholomew Otheman, 1824; E. Ireson, 1825; Orange Scott, 
1826-27; T. C. Pierce, 1828; S. W. Wilson, 1829-30; J. C. Bontecue, 1831-32; 
Eufus Spaulding, 1833 ; John Lord, 1834. 



RELIGIOUS HISTORY. 1783-1834. 29 

country is clearly shown during its first half-century. The old 
practical unity disappeared, great diversity ensued, during the 
earlier stages of which there was strong feeling, but out of all 
this the new institutions of the country developed good in each 
group that was formed. Perhaps it might be broadly stated 
that the adherents to the old order of thought were chiefly in 
the First and Winthrop churches ; that those who felt most its 
restrictions were with the Universalists ; that those longest re- 
pressed but who experienced fully the new liberty were with 
the Baptists and the Catholics, of which latter the earlier open 
appearance was towards the end of the period ; that the more 
fashionable, as well as the more anti-Calvinistic, were with the 
Unitarians ; that there was a very general attendance at some 
form of church service, and material as well as other help given 
it ; and that the results proved that each group of Americans, 
each in its own way, could do, and did do, credit to itself and 
good in the community. 

A Sunday school is supported by each of these churches. 
Although the pioneer school in this country, it is said, was be- 
gun as early as 1790, at Philadelphia, and that in Massachusetts 
by 1810, the first in Boston was opened sometime later. In 
Charlestown the Baptists had a school taught on Saturday 
afternoons, and outside the meeting-house, by the minister. 
This (about 1813) became a Sunday school, still continued. On 
a larger scale, the First Church established (Oct., 1816) a Sun- 
day school, said to have been the first among the Congregation- 
alists, and also still continued. Connected with its early work 
and history were several men whose reputation was, or grew to 
be, national, and ladies whose family names are well known in 
the town, — Adams, Evarts, Edes, Harris, KetteM, Payson, and 
Tufts. Soon after its organization the Winthrop Society began 
a second Trinitarian school. In 1822 the Methodists formed 
theirs, that has had twenty or more superintendents, and, since 
about 1841, an infant department. The Unitarian school was 
gathered in March, 1828, and the Universalist in May, 1829, 
and, it may be added here, the Monument Square in 1847. All, 
or nearly all of these schools now contain as many members as 
the congregations with which they are connected. 



30 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 



POLITICS. 1783-1834. 



While old forms of organization and management of local 
public affairs continued, the new national life supplied a far 
greater variety of subjects for political opinions and actions of 
v/ider scope. As independence differed from subjection, so, 
naturally, would the results of nationality from those of pro- 
vincialism. Parties with different policies of course in time 
arose. It is pleasant to notice that the patriotic town voted for 
the great signer of the Declaration, John Hancock, that from it 
went to the Constitutional Convention its distinguished resident, 
Nathaniel Gorham, and that it was united under Washington 
until 1795. Then " unhappy divisions " are said to have fol- 
lowed. The national administration was Federalist under 
President John Adams (1797—1801), and then Republican, 
that is, Democratic, under the three succeeding administrations 
(1801-25), varying from intensity through the earlier part of 
the time to moderation at the close. The State meanwhile was 
Federalist. Between the two parties the town was not very 
unequally divided, so that there seems to have been a constant 
struggle, but most of the time the Democrats " exclusively 
ruled " in local politics and government, except in 1809 and 
1812, when a Union ticket prevailed (Dr. B.). The figures of 
the votes for Governor (Sec. State's records) in years of Presi- 
dential elections give their evidence of the feeling of the people, 
and also of their numbers, in the following table where the 
names of candidates elected are shown by italics : — 





Federalist. 




Democratic. 




Scattering. 


Total. 


1797. 


Increase Sumner, 
Moses Gill, 


31 
150 






6 


187 


1801. 


Caleb Strong, 


173 


Elbridge Gerry, 


289 


15 


477 


1805. 


Caleb Stivng, 


262 


James Sullivan, 


483 


5 


750 


1809. 


Christopher Gore, 


265 


Levi Lincoln, 


444 




709 


1813. 


Caleb Strong, 


388 


Joseph B. Varnum 


, 425 


8 


821 


1817. 


John Brooks, 


404 


Henry Dearborn, 


376 




780 


18-21. 


Gov. Brooks, 


290 


Wm. Eustis, 


341 




631 


1825. 


(Return imperfect.) 


Levi Lincoln, 


325 


16 




1829. 


Levi Lincoln, 


210 


]Marcu3 IMorton, 


205 


11 


420 


1834. 


John Davis, 


2r)0 


]\Iarcus ^Morton, 


173 








(Sam. C. Allen, 


276 


John Q. Adams, 


106) 


2 


807 



BUSINESS. 1783-1834. 31 

In 1817 appears to have been the one victory of the Federal- 
ists, who in the latter part of this period were succeeded by the 
Whigs as the opponents of the Democrats. Local subjects and 
political contests are sometimes exciting, but as time goes on 
they generally leave slight show of special or personal distinc- 
tions. As is apt to be the American result, here the general 
work of fair or good government was accomplished ; a large 
number of men filled offices and did their part in their day or 
generation, and the institutions of the people were served and 
perpetuated. The little world here moved and proved itself a 
good American town, and that was enough. 

BUSINESS. 1783-1834. 

An intelligent and thrifty community, intent on business, 
and availing itself of the new opportunities that came along with 
new national life, would show an important part of its history 
in private and public undertakings for material gain and im- 
provement. Besides what could be done in its particular 
sphere, it would also show what would be thought of, tried, 
and accomplished in an American town of its period. Streets 
(1783, etc.), roads, and bridges (1785-87), the simplest forms 
of public improvement in communications, had been opened, 
and then what had been, and were, the chief and best means 
for reaching distant places were sought. In 1793, the Propri- 
etors of the Middlesex Canal were incorporated, and if its 
connection with Charlestown was simply that it started there, 
and a few of its corporators or stockholders lived in the place, 
the work was an important one to the town. It was one of 
the very earliest undertakings of the kind in the country, and 
was to connect tide-water with the upper Merrimac. Progress 
was slow. Not until Aug. 2, 1794, was the survey completed, 
and only in 1803 was tlie canal opened. Even slower was the 
operation of making the work profitable. Between January, 
1794, and Sept. 1, 1819, a hundred assessments were laid, so 
that the net cost of each share was then $1,455, " and no divi- 
dend could be or was declared until Feb. 1," in the latter year. 
Even when income was really obtained it was very small, the 



32 A CENTURY OF TO^yN LIFE. 

average for the twenty-four years during which it was paid 
being only l-^o% per cent. Finally the railroad ended the 
business, the charter was forfeited (1860), and the canal de- 
stroyed. Surveying appears to have been such a very inexact 
science with the builders that remarkable mistakes were made 
in determining water levels (Eddy, Hist., 4), and the banks 
and other parts were so imperfectly built that incessant repairs 
were for a long while required. Furthermore, Mr. Sullivan's 
first report (1809) as agent, stated (p. 6) that- " scarcely any 
corporate property depends more on the commerce of our 
country than the canal," and that this one had been " almost 
wholly deprived of income from carrying a main article, lum- 
ber ; consequently " that tolls for the year had been only 
$57,237.93. "Whatever were the pecuniary results of the work, 
the enterprise of the proprietors was shown, and their business 
sagacity should not be impeached, for they did their best under 
the circumstances. 

Turnjnkes were another public improvement, long tried in 
England, and then built in America ; and although the geog- 
raphy of Charlcstown did not admit any great development 
of them there, one for Salem started (1802) from the Square, 
and another for Medford crossed (1803) more of the town. 
Besides these, connections were also made with similar roads 
beyond its tcrritoi-y. 

Meanwhile, and for years later, private enterprise was en- 
gaged in buying and selling real estate, and in reconstructing 
and enlarging the town. Indeed, for a considerable time these 
operations were like what is now going on in many a new place 
in the country. At and after the rebuilding, both natives and 
new-comers were thus occupied, some of them on quite an ex- 
tensive scale. Of the former, or of the older inhabitants, 
Nathaniel Austin was active (to 1814) in all, but chiefly the 
central, parts of the town; EbcnT Breed (do.), largely towards 
the Point ; Dca. David Goodwin, a builder and of the Baptist 
church, for about thirty years, on Town Hill, and Bow and 
Washington streets ; Dea. John Larkin, First Church (to 
1803), in sundry parts and on Breed's Hill ; John Hay (to 
1800), chiefly on "Main Street (Plan IV.) ; Caleb Swan (1783- 



BUSINESS. 1783-1834. 33 

1810), on Main, Bow, and Back streets, as well as in other 
places ; David Wood (to 1796), on Main Street (Plan IV.), 
on the mainland, and (do.) D. Wood, Jr. (to 1806) on Main 
Street. Joseph Hnrd, and Dr. Isaac Rand also did considera- 
ble after the war. Of other prominent old names it may be 
noted that the Russells owned chiefly outside the Neck, and 
that of the once large possessions of the Bunkers, little re- 
mained with them at this time other than the pasture that made 
their name historic. Of new comers or owners, Giles Alexan- 
der (from Roxbury) was active chiefly (1800-15) on the Hill ; 
Matthew Bridge (from Lexington, 1785), on the Square, Town 
Hill, the Dock, and Green Street (to 1814) ; Thos. Brooks, a 
brickmaker (1792, and the next thirty years), at the Point 
and the N. and E. parts of the town ; Isaac Carlton, a mason, 
in sundry parts (1799-1805) ; Jon* Carlton, a builder (from 
New York), on Cordis, Main, Austin, streets, etc. (1801-08) ; 
Capt. Jos. Cordis (1780 and over 20 years after), near the 
town dock, and over a large area from Maine to High Street 
(Plan IV.) ; John Harris (1783-1803), and Capt. Thos. Harris 
(1781-1814), along the river front, largely in Bow Street ; 
Oliver Holden (from Pepperell, February, 1788), in many 
parts of the town, especially on Salem Hill (1788, and many 
years after) ; and Capt. Arch*^ McNiel (New York ?), on Union, 
and all Washington Street (1794 to about 1820). 

Before the end of the last century, business in real estate 
began to extend in a way since immensely increased. Tracts 
of land were bought and new homes were made in what were 
then distant regions, on or near the frontiers. In this move- 
ment, Charlestown was notably represented by Nathaniel Gor- 
ham, who, acting with Oliver Phelps, of Windsor, Conn., and 
others, bought (1788) a large area in New York, to which 
Massachusetts had acquired a right. They were to pay in 
State paper, then worth about half of its nominal value ; but 
as it rose to par, they could only take a part of the purchase 
that bore their names. To it the son of Mr. Gordon went 
(1789), as also did his connection, Wm. Wood. One of the 
earlier and larger American maps is one of this tract, en- 
graved by A. Doolittle, New Haven. It is a curious demon- 

3 



34 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

stration of the thinly scattered settlements, or grist and saw- 
mills, then existing in what is noAv a populous region in the 
■western part of the Empire State. 

In local manufacturing there was also enterprise shown. 
"We are told by a historical writer of the time, and a resident 
(Dr. Morse, 1805), that at the beginning of the present cen- 
tury the activity and diversity was such that " pot and pearl 
ashes, rum, ships, and leather in all its branches," were made, 
as were articles of " silver, tin, brass, and pewter." There 
were " three rope-walks " lately built, and "trade and naviga- 
tion " had recently greatly increased. Eight years afterwards, 
another resident (Dr. Bartlett) printed statistics made by 
Timothy Thompson, Jr., showing that the annual value of the 
manufactures was 81,231,663, a little over half of which con- 
sisted of eighteen millions of bricks ($650,000). Morocco 
was the next article in amount (8225,000) ; cordage was the 
third (8100,000) ; soap and candles followed (-$89,000) ; and 
"common weaving" was last ($2,113). Within three years 
the making of " chaises, cordage, morocco, plated ware, and 
cabinet work " had " greatly lessened." Six years later it was 
stated (Dr. Morse, 1819) that " the manufactures of morocco 
leather, and of bricks," were " carried on here on a larger 
scale, probably, than in any other town in the State." Large 
quantities of " soal leather " were also made. Clay for the 
bricks was taken from lands subsequently (1842) in Somer- 
ville. The shipbuilding and ropemaking (except in the Navy 
Yard) ceased years ago, but some of the other kinds of busi- 
ness mentioned are still (1887) continued. 

Banking facilities appear to have been near enough at hand 
in Boston until 1825, when the Bunker Hill Bank^ was incor- 
porated with a capital of $150,000. This amount has been 
increased, and now is $500,000. Continuously, although in 
two buildings on one spot (p. 121) this institution has been 
very successful. In 1832, the Charlestown Bank,^ and the 



1 The Presidents have been, Tini^. Walker, David Devens, Edward Lawrence, 
and T. T. Sawj-er. 

* Tlie Presidents were, E. D. Clark (1832-39 ?), and then Paul Willard. 



CONDITION, 1831. 35 

Phoenix Bank^ were incorporated. The capital of the former 
($150,000) was soon reduced (1840), and then operations 
ceased. The latter was twice as large, but failed in 1842, and 
the charter was repealed (1845). A Savings Bank was begun 
in a small way in 1829, by the incorporation of the Warren 
Institution for Savings.^ At the end of the first year's busi- 
ness the amount on deposit was only $6,145, but so great has 
been the constant increase that it is now fully four and a 
quarter millions of dollars. For five and twenty years this 
was the only bank of the kind in the town. 

Business in insurance was started by a local company, the 
Charlestown Fire and Marine, in 1830, but a year afterwards 
it was moved to Boston and its name changed to the Neptune, 
subsequently well known and successful. The Charlestown 
Mutual Fire Insurance Company was incorporated in 1836, but 
it had not a very long career. 



CONDITION, 1834. 

At the end of the first half-century after the rebuilding of 
the town was fairly begun, there were (as may be counted in 
the second Directory, 1834) 52 streets, 14 courts, 5 lanes, 3 
places, and 23 wharves. On them lived about 10,000 people, 
for whose use there were 8 meeting-houses, 9 primary and 3 
reading and writing schools (the whole cost of which was only 
$11,079), 5 engine-houses, and 2 burial-grounds. Names of 
8 ministers, 2 doctors, and 6 lawyers are found. There were 
a brewery, convent, library (the Union), a newsroom, marine 
railway, pottery, tannery, seminary, and shipyard (at the cor- 
ner of Austin and Washington streets). For seven years a 
permanent newspaper had been published. Local government 
was carried on by 73 town officers, including 2 constables, a 
pound-keeper, and 5 ty thing-men. The military element was 

1 The Presidents were, Isaac Fiske (1832-37 ?), Wm. Wyman, 1837-42, and, in 
closing its affairs, Jas. Hunnewell. 

2 The Presidents have been, Tim. Walker, 1829-34 ; John Skinner, 1835-39 ; 
Benj. Thompson, 1840-42 ; Chester Adams, 1843-49; Kathan A. Tufts, 1850-55; 
James Adams, 1856-80 ; T. T. Sawyer, 1881, and since. 



36 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

represented bj four companies (see p. 65). Besides the old 
Fire Societies (p. 64) there were town engine companies, 
Hancock 1, Bunker Hill 2, Jefferson 3, Warren 4, Washington 
5, with brilliant machines worked by hand, and the "Hook 
and Ladder," with a carriage of imposing size. The costumes 
worn by members of these public organizations, when on duty, 
showed much more lively coloring than is seen now in corre- 
sponding positions. There were canal boats to Lowell, stages 
thence and elsewhere, " hourlies " to Boston, and no railroads. 

Then, and indeed for years later, from near the Navy Yard 
to the Neck, there was a large amount of pasture or vacant 
land along, and especially back of, the hills. A part of Moul- 
ton's hill was standing ; clay-pits yawned between it and the 
slopes northward, and a beach shaded by willows extended 
beside the upper part of Medford Street. There were stone- 
walls, rail-fences, and barberry bushes on the roadsides just 
beyond the Neck ; and hardly a road-bed was well made or 
kept, while cobble-stones were the best that the arts of the 
time could do for the most travelled part of the chief high- 
way, the Main Street. This was much like such streets found 
in large country towns. Many of the houses were separated 
from each other by small strips of garden or grass-ground, 
and numerous shade trees gave a very pretty effect. Few 
buildings could be called fme, but many were neat, quaint, 
and respectable. 

Of the inhabitants, only twelve, according to the Directory, 
were colored, and hardly twice that number were of foreign 
birth. Elsewhere, however, it is stated that in 1830 there 
were 96 blacks and 530 foreign, in a population of 8,783. 
Still, two centuries after its settlement, the town continued 
to be what it always had been, a place almost wholly occupied 
by people of English descent. 

The census of the town at different times has already been 
given (p. 24). By 1834 there was a large number of what 
were then old settled inhabitants, much attached to the place. 
Local spirit and enter})risc abounded, and there was a proper 
local pride. It was a town in and of itself, with a history 
that was esteemed, and a future to be kept as good, or im- 



CONDITION, 1834, 37 

proved. Ne"w residents were also continually arriving, and 
not a few became more permanent than many who moved here 
earlier in the century, when, although the town attracted a 
number of well known men or families, it did not long retain 
them.i 

There was so much land then unoccupied by buildings that 
the town was tried as a place for suburban residences. No 
person had what would now be thought any large wealth.^ 
A variety of trades were carried on (1834), but there was no 
great diversity or amount of manufacturing. Distilling, how- 
ever, continued to be a somewhat prominent industry, and at 
the wharves there was a fair business. Within the limits of 
the town there were establishments of far more than local im- 
portance, — one of the most complete Navy Yards, with the 
best dry dock and ropewalk in the country ; the State Prison, 
improved, and solidly built (277 convicts, Oct,, 1834) ; and the 
McLean Asylum for the Insane, opened Oct, 6, 1818, that to 
the end of 1833 had received 1015 patients. 

Socially, there was probably more informal visiting than 
there now is. Family and -other groups, as is apt to be the 
case in an old place of moderate size, were larger, and were 
intimate. No excess of great parties seems to have occurred. 
Many of the elegancies as well as conveniences of recent times 
were not found. Parlors in the best of houses were furnished 

1 The Hon. Artemas Ward lived (about 1802-10) on Main Street (p. 147) ; 
the Hon. Sam. Dana (1808-12) in the Kettell mansion (p. 92) ; Jas. Harrison 
(1802-12) in what was later called the Baldwin house (p. 96) ; Jeremiah Evarts, 
the distinguished philanthropist, for some years (to 1817) on Chelsea Street, op- 
posite the Navy Yard ; and the Hon. Edward Everett, while Governor (1836-40), 
on Harvard Street (p. 129), after living in the Odin house on Winter Hill, then 
in Charlestown, 

^ By the long Parish list of 1807, only five persons had an income of $1,000 or 
over, estimated at 6 ];)er cent on the valuation of their property, as it there is, — 
Joseph Hurd ($2,538), Richard Devens ($1,994), John Larkin ($1,896), Matthew 
Bridge ($1,269), and Giles Alexander ($1,224). In 1844, the Town published a 
list of tax-payers, by which we count 2,777 tax-bills of residents ; of these, 45 are 
from $100 to $200, 16 from $200 to $300, and only 12 are over that amount,— 
David Devens, Jacob Foss (the largest), Jacob Forster, Henry Forster, Jas, Gould, 
James Hunnewell, John Hurd, Wm. Hurd, Eeuben Hunt, Caleb Pierce, Gilbert 
Tufts, and Wm. J. Walker. There was one non-resident, Rich*^ Sullivan, to be 
added. The largest corporation, the Fitchburg R. R. Co., paid $255. 



38 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

with simple but good mahogany furniture, strong enough, how- 
ever, to outlive more showy modern articles. Open fire-places 
for wood, grates for coal, or a stove, warmed the rooms. A 
tall bronze astral lamp gave light. Mirrors were a greater 
luxury ; not apt to be very large, sometimes with square pan- 
elled tops, sometimes circular, and in gilded frames. Bric-a- 
brac was little known. Many of the houses had more or less 
garden ; here and there it was very small, but altogether the 
effect along a few of the older streets was very pleasant during 
summer. The boys of the town fought with those of East 
Cambridge and the north end of Boston ; and some of the 
commoner men behaved worse, for more drunkards were seen 
then than now are, and teamsters not infrequently acted with 
disgusting brutality, while rowdyism was far from being un- 
known; indeed the one riot in the Town's history occurred 
near the end of this period. At the same time a very great 
majority of the people were orderly, attendance at church was 
much more general than at present, and every one, it might 
be said, took part in public affairs. Town meetings in the old 
Hall (p. 71) were often large, and sometimes lively ; and then 
and later, as now, demagogues made more than their share of 
noise, but the substantial citizens were apt, in the long run, to 
keep proper control. Public expenditures were moderate, and 
were regulated as honest, sensible men manage their own. 
There had been no perilous development of municipal credits, 
and there was very little magnificent public spirit supported 
by some other person's money. 

RELIGIOUS HISTORY SINCE 1834. 

With the second half-century also began a period of pros- 
perity general among the Protestant churches, and that, for 
perhaps the ensuing thirty years, was, with most of them, their 
time of greatest success. In the Roman Catholic Church there 
has been uninterrupted growth to the present time. At first 
this communion was small ; now it numbers possibly a third 
of the population. Among the Protestants attendance at first 
was general ; now it seems true that hardly two-thirds of them 



RELIGIOUS HISTORY SINCE 1834. 39 

help to support any church in the town, while the Catholics 
almost unanimously attend their own service, so that their 
societies have increased from one to three. 

Congregationalism,! that, as already shown, had been almost 
the sole denomination in the town until about 1810, and that 
soon afterwards became divided, was still the most prominent 
for some time after 1834. Through perhaps twenty years 
from 1840 it was difficult to hire a good pew in either of its 
three meeting-houses,^ so well filled were they (as was probably 
true of others). An ideal of the relation of pastor and people 
could hardly be more fully realized than it was in the ministry 
of Dr. Budington (1840-54) in the First Church. With the 
enthusiasm of a young man and of his own nature, as well as 
with the devotion of a Christian, he labored for it, while the 
people — the town, indeed — held him in affectionate regard ; 
nor could the love of Christians for their church be more touch- 
ingly and earnestly shown than was the love of some of the 
old members for what they called " the old church," that they 
or theirs had sustained through many trials. Since 1833, it 
may be added, the Trinitarians have built three meeting- 
houses,^ while the Unitarians have (since 1818) built one 
house (supplemented, 1856-79, by the Harvard Chapel). 

All the Protestant societies tliat have existed in or during 
the period have been active, but their number has not in- 
creased. Each of them now has a place of worship ^ that is 
better, or is in better condition, than ever, and there are few 
debts, yet in all of them there is a feeling of changed circum- 
stances. Some serious questions are suggested in regard to 
the future, and it may be asked how far great freedom of 

1 Of Unitarian, a full account is given in its History (Bib., p. 87) ; of Trinita- 
rian, a condensed account of the First Churcli on the following pages, and of the 
Winthrop Church in its Memorial (p. 273, this book). The latter states (p. 9) 
that its contributions for benevolent objects (besides support of that church) was in 
fifty years, $155,488. To this should be added the large gifts of two members, — 
Wm. Carlton, to Carlton College, Minnesota, and Thos. Doane to Doane College, 
Nebraska. In the First Church parishioners, Walter Hastings (over twenty 
years) bequeathed a large sum to Harvard College, and Jas. Hunnewell (nearly 
forty years) was one of the largest private contributors to Oahu College, 

2 See pages 53 to 59 hereafter, for descriptions. 



40 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

thought and action, and, with many persons, a growing lack of 
a sense of duty or responsibility, are compatible with efficiency 
and durability. Remarkable success has been obtained by a 
church in which there are few rich persons, and a great many 
who are not, but where every one is taught and held to the 
personal obligation to do something, even if little. It may 
also be asked, what is likely to be the final result of abandon- 
ment of an old order of service in which worship forms a great 
part, and where this is actively and frequently shared by the 
congregation, and the substitution of an order in which, as is 
not unknown, there is a tendency in the meeting-house to have 
a lecture at one end, a concert at the other, and between them 
a critical audience. 

If briefly summed up, it may be said that within this period 
the Congregationalists have hardly held their own ; that the 
Baptists and Universalists have done better ; the Methodists 
have largely gained ; the Episcopalians, as a body, come into 
being and not heavily increased ; and the Catholics have grown 
to a remarkable extent. 

On April 16, 1882, the Sunday after Easter, and a pleasant 
day, a count was made of the attendance at the churches in 
Boston (Daily Adv., 18th) showing that the result in Charles- 
town was that there were at the First Church, 110 -f- 88 = 198 ; 
Winthrop, 380 + 270 =650 (848 Trinitarian) ; Unitarian, 163 ; 
St. John's, 400 -|- 100 = 500 ; Monument Square, 250 + 775 = 
1,025; Trinity, 320 + 601 = 921 (1,916 Methodist); Univer- 
salist, 337 -f 310 = 647 ; First Baptist, 211 (a. m.) ; B. H. do., 
400 (p. M.) All except the last two, and the Unitarian, where 
there is one service, arc for the usual two services, making a 
total of 4,715 ; that with all the Baptists would probably be 
6,000. At the Roman Catholic services there were at St. 
Francis's, 1,478 + 341 = 1819, and St. Mary's, 950 + 502 = 
1,452, or in all, 3,271, — about forty per cent of all the 
attendance. 

At a later date (1885 ?) an examination of the town was 
made to a considerable, yet not the fullest, extent, by which it 
was found that among Protestants there were 1,311 families 
not in churches but expressing some preference for denomina- 



RELIGIOUS HISTORY SINCE 1834. 41 

tions, and 490 not wishing to attend church. On Sunday, May 
1, 1887, a pleasant day, a count (for Dr. Towle, Prest. Y. M. 
C. A.) was made of the attendance at the morning services. 
At the First Church there were 126 ; Winthrop, 480 (606 
Trinitarians) ; Unitarian, 170 ; First Baptist, 290 ; B. H. Bap- 
tist, 200 (490 Baptists) ; Trinity, 270 ; Union, 130 (400 Meth- 
odists) ; Universalist, 215 ; St. John's, 219. At the First 
Church, and at St. John's, the second service would add con- 
siderable numbers to these figures, and others would in the 
same way be increased. The total for the morning is 2,100, 
and for the day might possibly be 3,500 Protestants (in a 
population of about 38,000), or thirty -five per cent less than 
five years before (out of about 34,000). At the same time 
400 families attended to some extent the services at the Young 
Men's Christian Association, but contributed little to the ex- 
penses. It is said that very few of the families reported 
(1885 ?) as non-attendants were gathered into the churches, 
where it seems as if only about one quarter of the Protestant 
adult population was found, although many others were repre- 
sented by children in the Sunday Schools. Only a moderate 
percentage of the young men went to church ; indeed, the 
average attendance of adults at any one ordinary service is 
now less, it is said, than the number of enrolled communicants. 
Evidently there is cause enough for serious thought and action. 
It is noticeable that attendance at the services on Easter and 
Christmas has largely increased at tlie Episcopal Church, while 
that on Fast and Thanksgiving, the two Congregational special 
days, has so much declined that only one service is held for all 
the other Protestant churches. It is, however, a very good 
arrangement, for all the separated congregations and clergy 
act in neighborly union. In weekly meetings there are some- 
times appeals through a lower range of attractions, and it 
seems as if a more general reliance might be had on those of 
beauty, dignity, and solemnity. 

Note. — The ministers since 1834, on the authorities given, have been 
the Reverends — 

(First Church), Warren Fay, D. D., dis. Aug. 16, 1839 (pastor 19^ yrs.) ; 
Wm. I. Budington, D. D., ord. April 22, 1840, dis. July 24, 1854 (14^ yrs.) ,- 



42 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

Jas. B. Miles, D. D., ord. Jan. 2, 1855, dis. Sept. 30, 1871 (16f yrs.) ; 

F. F. Ford, ins. Oct. 11, 1872, dis. Dec. 3, 1874 ; H. L. Kendall, ins. 
April 19, 187 G, dis. Nov. 13, 1879; Geo. L. Brooks, since July, 1883. 
{Records, etc.) 

(Winthrop), D. Crosby (1833-42); John Humphrey (1842-47); B. Tap- 
pan, D. D. (1818-57); A. E. Kittredge (1859-63); J. E. Eankin, D. 1). 
(1861-69); A. S. Twombly, D. D., since ins. May 2, 1872. (History.) 

(Harvard), Jas. Walker, D. D., to July 14, 1839; Geo. E. Ellis, D. D., 
ord. Mch. 11, 1840, dis. June 13, 1869; Chas. E. Grinnell, Nov. 10, 1869, 
to Dec. 31, 1873 ; Pitt Dillingham, since Oct. 4, 1876. (History.) 

(First Baptist), Wm. Phillips (1836-41); H. K. Green (1842-44) ; Wm. 
C. Child (1814-19); T. F. Caldicott (1850-53); A. M. Hopper (ord. 1855); 
R. W. Cushman (ord. 1857); G. W. Gardner, D. D. (1861-72); W. W. 
Boyd (ord. 1873); J. B. Brackett (ord. 1878); J. W. Eiddle (ord. 1881); 
Geo. E. Horr, Jr., since Apr. 30, 1884. (G. R. Seymour.) 

(Universalist), T. F. King (1836-39); E. H. Chapin, D. D. (1840-46); 
Thos. Starr King (1816-48) ; R. Townley (1849-52) ; A. G. Laurie (1853-63) ; 
O. F. Safford (1805-70); AVm. T. Stowe (1871-77); Chas. F. Lee, since 
Jan. 7, 1879. (Printed acc't.) 

(St. John's, Episcopal), N. T. Bent (1840-41); P. H. Greenleaf (Oct., 
1841-Feb., 1851); Wm. Flint (1852-Sept. 1, 1855); T. R. Lambert, D. D. 
(1856-Jan. 1, 1884) ; P. W. Sprague since April, 1884. (Records.) 

(B. Hill Baptist), John Blain, settled 1850 ; Emery Page, 1853 ; H. C. 
Graves, 1857 ; J. B. Morse, 1864 ; L. F. Beecher, 1867; Addison Parker, 
1869 ; W. O. Holman, 1874 ; W. M. Weeks, 1882 ; C. F. Nicholson, 1883; 
R. B. Moody, since 1884. (/. H. Bailey, Clerk Soc.) 

(St. Mary's), Patrick Byrne, 1830-43; Geo. J. Goodwin to Sept. 13, 1847; 
P. F. Lyndon, to May 29, 18.53; Geo. A. Hamilton, Aug. 1853, to July 31, 
1874. (Enterprise, acc't.) Assisting, have been M. McGrath, E. F. Gerbi, 

G. F. Nuonno. John W. Mahon since Aug., 1881; Wm. J. Millerick since 
Feb., 1882; Wm. F. Powers since July, 1886. 

(St. Francis), Geo. A. Hamilton, 1862-65 ; M. J. Supple, assistant, pastor 
since 1868 ; M. M. Green assistant ; since 1879, Jas. N. Supple. (Do.) 

POLITICAL HISTORY SINCE 1834. 

The political opinions of the inhabitants, as well as the con- 
stantly increasing number of voters, are shown by the returns 
made at elections for governors in the years when presidential 
electors were chosen. In four,i while the Whigs carried the 

^ The names of those elected are in italics, and the votes were: — 
1835, Edward Everett, 532 ; Marcus Morton, 477 ; others, 43 ; total, 1,052. 
1839, do. 579; do. 820; do, 4; do. 1,403. 

1843, Geo. K Bnggs, 622 ; do. 777 ; do. 135 ; do. 1,534. 

1847, do. 662 ; Caleb Cashing, 841; do. 239; do. 1,742. 



POLITICAL HISTORY SINCE 1834. 43 

State, the Democrats ruled the town. Another element, how- 
ever, began to appear here, as it did elsewhere, eventually to 
control the country, and even change the politics of Charles- 
town. In 1851, R. C. Winthrop had 995 votes ; Creo. S. Bout- 
well, 932 ; John G. Palfrey, 176 ; others, 2 ; (total, 2,105). In 
1855, H. J. Gardner had 1,127 ; E. D. Beach, 759 ; J. Rock- 
well, 311 ; S. H. Walley, 276 ; (total, 2,478.) 

In the next four presidential elections, including the last sepa- 
rate vote by Charlestown, great changes in political thought, as 
well as in numbers, appeared. A great many civilians were 
employed in the Navy Yard, and whatever political help was 
to be got that way was not apt to be neglected by the Demo- 
crats, who held the national administration until after the 
election in 1860. A similar course, it is very likely, affected 
the Republican vote during the war, and in a greater degree, 
for there was a far larger force in government employ. A 
much stronger reason, however, existed in the immense popu- 
lar movement by which the latter party was supported. It 
will be noticed that Charlestown was Republican notwithstand- 
ing any influence of the existing administration, in 1860, and 
continued so for years after the end of the war. For some 
time before that eventful period, all phases of political feeling 
were actively shown, from marked subserviency to tlie parti- 
sans of slavery to open help in trying to stop its extension, — 
from " copperheadism " (only a mere trace of it) to a generous 
patriotism and enthusiasm worthy of Bunker Hill, felt by all 
sorts of people. 

In 1842, a notable municipal change occurred ; a portion of 
the territory of the town was annexed to West Cambridge, and 
a larger part incorporated (March 3) as the town of Somerville, 
leaving the area of this town one of the smallest in the State. 
Feb. 22, 1847, a city form of government was established ; ^ 

The votes for electors were about as follows : — 

1860, Republican, 1,785 ; others, 1,528 ; total, 3,313. 

1864, do. 2,765; do. 1,198; do. 3,963. 

1868, do. 2,642 ; Democratic, 1,784 ; do. 4,426. 

1872, do. 3,014; do. 1,635; do. 4,649. 

^ The vote on accepting a Citij Charter was, — yes, 1,127 ; no, 868 ; majority 
in favor, 259. 



44 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

Hon. Geo. W. Warren was chosen major, ^ and various changes 
in schoolhouses and other things ensued. Among many sub- 
stantial citizens there was, in a few years, a belief that the 
place was too small for a separate municipality, and that its 
interests would be promoted by annexation to Boston.^ An 
Act of the Legislature to that effect was passed (April 29, 
1854) and accepted (C, Oct. 2) by the voters of both cities, 
but rendered inoperative, it was said, through a failure (in C.) 
to certify returns. The City record (of C.) is suggestive ; the 
figures of the vote, given below, are from the Daily Advertiser, 
and show the deep interest in the subject, as 2,529 voters 
(there were 2,722 in 1851) gave their opinion. The plan de- 
feated had been considered over twenty years before, and, after 
intermittent effort, was actively revived about as long after- 
wards. Another Act was passed (May 14, 1873), duly voted 
on (Oct. 7), and annexation effected (Jan. 1, 1874). A score 
of pamphlets on the subject, described in the Bibliography, 
fully set forth reasons for and against the measure, and furnish 
some of the liveliest political writing about the Town. That 
the reasons were thought to be good and sufficient is shown by 
the votes at the two dates, said to be the only times when op- 
portunity was given for such an expression of opinion. That 
there was strong opposition appears in the Valedictory Ad- 
dress of the last Mayor, who declared that, on the day of 
voting, " the people of this ancient and historic municipality 
virtually said we are not capable of governing ourselves, and 
bowed to the God of Mammon, and yielded up, with their in- 
dependence forever, that trust which was bequeathed to them 
to transmit to posterity." The number of municipal offices 
has been much reduced, cases before the courts are tried in 
Suffolk, the bridges arc improved, and a few other changes 



1 jThe Mayors have been the Honorahles Geo. "VV. "Wan-en (1847-50), R. Froth- 
ingham (1851-53), J. Adams (1854), T. T. Sawyer (1855-57), Jas. Dana (1858-60), 
H. G. Hutchins (1861), P. J. Stone (1862-64), C. Robinson, Jr. (1865-66), L. 
Hull (1867-68), E. L. Norton (1869), W. H. Kent (1870-72), J. Stone (1873). 

2 The votes on Annexation were, 1S54, Charlestown, yes, 1,412 ; no, 1,117 ; 
majority, 295 ; Boston, yes, 3,333 ; no, 1,373 ; majority, 1,960. In 1S78, C, yes, 
2,240 ; no, 1,947 ; majority, 293 ; B., yes, 5,960 ; no, 1,868 ; majority, 4,097. 



BUSINESS SINCE 1834. 45 

have followed, but the right of suffrage and the blessings of 
liberty have not been seriously impaired. 

Since annexation, changes have naturally followed in what 
might be called the individuality of the place, noticeable in 
society as well as in local politics. For the exercise of the 
latter a considerable number of offices remain, but they differ 
in influence as merged among the many of a large corporation, 
instead of being far greater means of control in a body, even 
if that is comparatively small. Of one form of change, hardly 
political, indeed, but public, there is evidence afforded by ex- 
amination of the Auditors' Eeports of Boston, where it appears 
that the valuation (1874, p. 288) of Real Estate in Charles- 
town was 126,016,100 in 1873, and in 1886 (Rep. '87) it was 
$23,075,700, or $2,940,400 less; and that Personal (same 
dates) declined from $9,273,528, to $5,682,000 (38| %), or a 
total decline of $6,531,928 (about 181 ^^). in 1873, to a 
population estimated by the assessors (Rep. '74, p. 7) the av- 
erage was $1101 -|- per head, and by the census of 1885, with 
the valuation of 1886, it was $730 + (about 33/o % less). 

BUSINESS SINCE 1834. 

At the beginning of the second half-century there was a fair 
amount of local business, but not much on any large scale. 
Many persons, as has since been the case, lived in the town 
and had various occupations in Boston. Farmers and traders 
came with their produce to the Square, and made it the live- 
liest place of traffic. There were sufficient banking facilities, 
and the local shops had relatively a greater importance than at 
present. With the introduction of railroads in the State, a 
fresh development occurred here, as elsewhere. The line to 
Lowell, opened in 1835, extended through what was then the 
westerly part of the town, but a mile or more distant from its 
frontage on deep water. To connect the two, the Charlestoivn 
Branch Railroad Co. was incorporated (April 9, 1836), and 
built from Swett's wharf to a junction not much over a mile 
distant, near the McLean Asylum, the chief work on it being a 
wooden bridge in that direction from Prison Point. Short as 



46 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

was the line, it was not opened until the latter part of 1838, 
the national financial crisis having a severe effect. Supple- 
mentary to this road was the Charlestown Wharf Co. (inc. 
Mch. 31, 1836), that was authorized to hold wharf and other 
property from the Navy Yard to the State Prison, and did hold 
a great deal within these limits. Six years later the Fitchhurg 
Railroad Co. was incorporated (Mch. 3, 1842), and acquired 
both the Branch road and much of the land of the other com- 
pany. In the two last mentioned there was a considerable 
local interest, some of which was transferred to their far 
larger successor, that began a remarkable development at the 
lower end of the town, by which, in the course of forty years, 
a station on a side-track was changed to an important railway 
terminus. The Wharf Co. liad a paid up capital of $293,550, 
the Branch Co. less (although more was authorized), and both 
had a moderate business, no great part of which was far reach- 
ing. The Fitchburg Co. at once largely increased it. A line 
was opened to Fresh Pond, and ice, a staple product of New 
England, was brought in great quantities to the wharves, and 
shipped to southern ports and abroad. Communication was 
speedily established with a wide interior country, so that public 
convenience required (1847) that the terminal station for pas- 
sengers should be moved from the northern end of Warren 
Bridge, where one of brick had been built, to the southern end, 
in Boston, and at a large cost this change was effected (1847- 
48). In Charlestown, additions to the territory were made, 
from time to time, by purchase and by covering flats or the 
river, the most important of these operations being in connec- 
tion with the estate of the Hoosac Tunnel Dock and Elevator 
Co. (inc. April 29, 1879), which was at length bought (1887), 
and exceptionally good terminal facilities at deep sea water 
secured, including enormous sheds and an immense grain ele- 
vator. A large area between the river, Chelsea Street, and the 
Square is also to be added. 

In 1873, the Eastern Railroad Co. bought an extensive tract 
covering flats, much of the old mill-pond, and a strip on the 
peninsula from the Prison to near the Square, and on the last 
built a very extensive station for merchandise. Almost simul- 



.BUSINESS SINCE 1834. 47 

taneously the Lowell Railroad Co. (1870) bought for freight- 
ing business another large tract at the Point, beyond the Navy 
Yard and along Mystic River, to which its tracks were ex- 
tended. It succeeded to the Mystic River road, incorporated 
in 1853, but long delayed in development. Thus three impor- 
tant companies came to hold a great deal of the old water front- 
age of the town, that thus became the seashore terminus of very 
large traffic extending through northern and central New Eng- 
land, to the maritime British Provinces, Canada, the Northwest- 
ern States of the Union, and even as far as California, while 
daily to all these distant parts go passengers over Charlestown 
ground. Curious processions of pungs from the upper coun- 
try long ago ceased to come down Main Street in the winter, 
as also did the canal boats to Mill Street in the summer ; loads 
of wood, hay, and produce are seen no more grouped in the 
Square ; clumsy and ponderous ice-wagons that wore the soft 
roads badly, the Lowell stage, and other creations familiar in 
1834, have not been known to the younger people, but there is 
a vastly greater traffic, such as would have amazed the men 
then, and that gives far more employment and income, and, in 
its way, is quite as picturesque. 

Another form of railroad at a later date became known in 
the larger towns of the country, and, as was apt to be the case 
with inventions, had a representation in Charlestown. With 
the increase of population the transportation of passengers 
through the streets required means very different from those 
previously used. As early as 1826, A. Studley established a 
line of " hourlies " from the Neck to Brattle Street, in Boston ; 
more business soon made the name inapplicable, for a vehicle 
was wanted every half, then quarter, of an hour, then oftener, 
and the conveyance for all became, as its newer name has 
descriptively styled it, an omnibus. No less than three lines 
at one time made the streets lively. At length the Middlesex 
Horse Railroad Co. was incorporated (1854), tracks were laid 
to Somerville, Medford, and Maiden, all (1887) made parts of 
the "West End Co. A line to Chelsea (afterwards much ex- 
tended) was also incorporated (1854). The different routes 
traverse the town and furnish ample accommodation. 



48 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

While the town has not been what is called a manufacturing 
place, several companies have been formed, and have done 
business in various departments. The Milk Row Bleachery 
when incorporated (1838) was on Charlestowu ground, but 
since 1842 on that of Somerville, where it has grown a great 
deal. Other incorporations followed, — of a Lead Co. (1850), 
and of the Union Sugar Refinery, the building of which be- 
came part of the freight station of the Eastern R. R. (1873). 
At least four companies have, since 1854, been engaged in 
developing business along the bank of Mystic River. The 
Howard Manufacturing Co. (1885) has a massive brick build- 
ing six stories high (Medford St.), with valuable machinery, and 
employs 200 persons in making excellent razor-straps, tooth- 
brushes, and elastics. 

Of other hinds of trade long known in the town,brickmaking 
ceased at the loss of the requisite ground in 1842; private 
shipbuilding, begun at Ten Hills (1631), ended about 1850 ; 
leather-making has almost disappeared ; brewing, and on a 
large scale, has continued at the Neck, and distilling almost 
on the very site, near the old town dock, where it was prac- 
tised long before the Revolution. Furniture, doors and finish, 
and pottery in coarse articles, have been made to quite a large 
extent, while innkeeping, always known and active here since 
the sign of the " Three Cranefe " was displayed, has been de- 
veloped almost on a scale like that shown by the railroads ; for 
directly beside the spot where stood the Puritan ordinary, opens 
the great front door of the Waverley House, a building large 
enough to lodge, on a pinch, the whole colony of 1630. A 
great hotel is one of the prominent evidences of the growth of 
an American town, and for this example we are indebted to 
Moses A. Dow, long a resident (Plan II. 44 A). He selected 
a site on the Square, the history of which is given on page 124. 
Inns had long been on or close by the spot, but he surpassed 
them so that comparison is impossible. His hotel, four and 
five stories high, built of red brick -sN-ith brown stone trimmings 
(except a central block covered with brown mastic), and having 
a frontage nearly 500 feet long, was inaugurated by one of the 
most notable dinners ever given in the town, Nov. 21, 1867, 



BUSINESS SINCE 1834. 49 

when, in the dining-room (80 X 50 ft.), an unusual represen- 
tation of Charlestown people assembled to do honor to him and 
liis achievement. 

In time more Banks had become wanted ; accordingly, in 
1854, the Monument ^ was incorporated. Its capital is $150,- 
000, its surplus is more than that amount, and its stock com- 
mands one of the highest prices given for any bank-stock in 
Boston, — a fact that tells its history. Ten days later, the Five 
Cent Savings Bank^ was incorporated. An account of its 
building and of its success is given elsewhere (p. 145). 

More and better light at night was also wanted by some, and 
in 1846 the Charlestown Gas Co.^ was incorporated. There 
was for a while no ardent desire to subscribe to the stock, so 
that the company was not organized for active operations until 
May 24, 1851, when the capital was 150,000. This was in- 
creased (Feb. 6, 1854) to 181,000, and as the works were 
enlarged was from time to time made more, until the final 
amount, -1500,000 was reached (1873), making it the largest 
manufacturing establishment ever in the town. The business 
has been carefully and economically conducted by a conserva- 
tive, yet progressive management, recognizing in due time 
changes and improvements, so that in Sep., 1886, the steam- 
boilers of the company were supplying power for making sim- 
ultaneously, as then nowhere else in the State, coal and water 
gas, and electric light. Within a srtiall area the combination 
was proved to be practicable and efficient. 

Supplying water, while done under direction of the City gov- 
ernment, and hence a municipal work, may, however, be con- 
sidered in one way a corporate work, and be mentioned in this 
chapter. After discussion incident to the undertaking, a Legis- 
lative Act was passed (1861) that resulted in the Mystic Water 
WorksJ^ Reports were made (1861-62), including one by Pro- 

1 The Presidents have been, Peter Huhbell (1854-71), and Jas. 0. Curtis. 

2 One President, P. J. Stone, and one Treasurer, Amos Stone, to 1887. 

8 The Presidents of the Gas. Co. have been, Geo. W. Warren (1851-55), Peter 
Hubbell (1855-71), Wm. Carlton (1871-76), Andrew Sawtell (1876-83), Francis 
Thompson (1833-85, Sep. ). All except the first died in office. Jas. F. Hunnewell, 
the present writer, has held it since Sep., 1885. 

< The Chairman of the Water Board before annexation was Edward Lawrence. 



50 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

fessor Silliman, an aqueduct was planned from Mystic Pond by- 
way of a reservoir on Walnut, or Tufts College, Hill, and ground 
was broken Sep. 27, 1862. On Nov. 29, 1863, the introduc- 
tion of water was celebrated, with a procession, speeches, a din- 
ner in the old Town Hall, and illuminations. By the Reports, 
that are full and interesting, it appears that the cost of the 
works (Feb. 28, 1865), was $746,965.44; their length, to the 
Neck, 5.62 miles ; the water-level of the reservoir, 147 feet 
above high water ; the extent of service pipes, 18 miles ; and 
the total number of customers, 2,020. Eight years later (1873) 
there were 13,946, and the construction account had risen 
to $1,461,259.41. In 1886, these numbers had increased to 
16,110, and $1,657,458.97. While there are no large build- 
ings, and nothing of the grand Roman style of masonry in 
the works, the earthen reservoir (560 x 350 ft.) on its high 
isolated site is quite imposing, and from its banks there- is 
a wide and varied view that is full of scenic and historic 
interest. 

Business in Charlestown to the present day may be said to 
have its great monument in the huge Hoosac Elevator, stand- 
ing close to the sites of the old battery and town dock. Where 
the snug little Provincial trade once centred, on the edge of a 
wilderness, rises this building (167 x 80), 135 feet high, gray 
slated, plain yet almost grand, receiving grain from a distant 
and then hardly known interior, to distribute it through great 
ocean steamers to lands even fartlier away, and help feed the 
people where the fathers of the founders once tilled the fields. 

PLACES OF PUBLIC WORSHIP. 

Until recent years, here, as has been the case in our older 
towns, these have been built chiefly according to the examples 
set by the early inhabitants, — that is, on what might be called 
an indigenous plan, with designs affected by the styles current 
in England. When the settlers came their first labor was, 
naturally, to provide shelter for their families, and then a place 
for public worship. In Charlestown, this place was combined 
with the residence of the Governor, but soon afterwards a 



PLACES OF PUBLIC WORSHIP. 61 

separate building for the purpose was erected. Limited means 
and available material had a large influence in shaping the 
building here, as they had elsewhere. A considerable space 
was to be enclosed at a necessarily moderate cost. Wood was 
almost the one possible material. The builders had not only 
separated from the Church of England and its usages, but they 
had done so when that church itself had abandoned the archi- 
tectural forms that had been used for ages, and had adopted a 
style more or less Italian. Hence it is not strange that the 
colonists attempted neither nave, chancel, nor arcades, but 
built a square wooden box, with fully enough windows, relieved 
by a few mouldings and details similar to those used at the 
time in the mother country, but yet a house capable of hold- 
ing all the people expected, and of giving them a full view of 
the pulpit. The colonial or provincial period of New England 
corresponded with the period in Old England when ecclesias- 
tical art was, on the whole, the least precious for the past eight 
centuries ; and it would be unreasonable to suppose that the peo- 
ple here, with their limited means, and deriving their scanty 
ideas of art, or their feeling for it, from a home where it was 
by no means at its best, would create notable material monu- 
ments of faith. In justice to them, furthermore, it should be 
observed that even to their simple buildings they not infre- 
quently gave quaintness or picturesqueness. 

They had cast adrift from an historical sequence in other 
things, and they ceased to cherish the form of home for wor- 
ship used in a varying way since the days of Constantine. 
They built, not a church of the long-recognized character, but 
a hall, and this, with a few exceptions, became, and continued 
to our time, the distinguishing shape of the New England 
meeting-house. 

Insubstantial in structure, as was apt to be the case, the 
third place of worship since the " Great House " was left, was 
built in 1716, on the Square, but exactly where is now hardly 
to be determined with absolute precision. It is said to have 
been a framed building, 72 by 52 feet, and 84 feet (or three 
stories ?) high, and had a steeple. This was the meeting- 
house burned June 17, 1775, valued (p. 174) at £3,000. 



52 A CENTURY OF TOTVN LIFE. 

There appears no reason to suppose that it differed much from 
the old meeting-houses in several neighboring tovrns, that had 
a steeple at one end, for, if we can infer from dimensions, and 
judge from a few imperfect views, it was not built like the 
house of the First Church, Boston, — nearly a square, with a 
roof sloping four ways, and bearing in the middle a belfry with 
a little attenuated spire. 

In 1783, on the general rebuilding of the town, its meeting- 
house was erected on the top of the Town Hill (Plan I.), from 
which a good deal of earth had been removed the year before, 
thus reducing its height. The grant of the land has already 
been quoted (p. 17), and some particulars about the house 
have been given. It was of wood, and was 72 by 52 feet ex- 
ternally, besides a porch, and a tower, 22|- by 20 feet, that 
fronted Henley Street. Some of the original plans further 
show that it had two rows of round-topped windows on the 
four sides, and a gallery around three sides of the interior. 
An enlargement became necessary in 1804, adding 15 feet on 
each side, making the building, if the rearrangement of the 
pews and the way they faced is the basis of description, 82 
feet wide and 72 feet long according to the plan, or 84 by 74 
feet as measured (J. H.). The steeple, according to a plan 
reported at a parish meeting June 8, 1803, was 193 feet high. 
It, like the interior finish at that time, was designed by Charles 
Bulfinch. Mr. Frothingham (Hist. C, 161) gives a litho- 
graphic general view of the exterior. Eeproductions from the 
original plan of the steeple, from an elevation of the side of 
the interior, and from plans of the pews, with names, before 
the alteration, are here given.^ It was by far the most impor- 
tant building in the town, and its erection so soon after the 
severe trials of the war was strong evidence of enterprise and 
devotion. Of special gifts, there was from Hon. Thomas Rus- 
sell a clock that still bears his name and keeps time well in its 
place on the front of the existing gallery ; a larger one is still 
doing good service in the present brick tower; and "Champion, 
Dickason, & Burgis, merchants of London, presented a bell " 

^ These plans, aud some other papers, saved by the late James Hunnewell, ap- 
pear to be about the only early Parish relics of the sort extant. 




^plar. cf Tfie efilttralicnj of the^estmg House in tfie ^frjt Parijfi irt the fo^n of C^iarfej'totrri 
■mor>ed an&prefcnleO by ainmitte_t^,iot/ie^ar,j-A at their mtettng c7uiie ^ //OJ. 



mm 



II 



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•'X ^ r^if 



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"■yy.)' > V// 



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Cmaf^uestown Meltikjg-House, I&04. 
Pews ON The Floor 



I 




Chaf^lestown Meetinq-House,I804-. 
Gallery Pews. 



54 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

ber and 45 tons of ton timber, together with 315,000 bricks, 
" nearly all of which were made in Charlestown," cellar stones 
from Cape Ann, and ashlar stones (still seen in the basement) 
from Quincy. These particulars are from the record kept by 
James Hunnewell, secretary and treasurer of the building 
committee, who, it should be added, gave very important help 
in carrying the Parish and ancient Church safely through a 
trying period. 

The edifice, dedicated July 3, 1834, was of the old hall plan, 
but it was finished in the style of the time. Internally the 
walls were covered with yellow wash ; the flat ceiling was plain 
and white, and had a large stucco centre-piece ; the pulpit, of 
mahogany, was semi-circular and high ; the facings of the 
galleries, on three sides, were panelled ; and two huge Doric 
pillars in front of the organ supported the inner part of the 
belfry. Underneath the hall were two " vestries," or lecture- 
rooms, and a sort of cellar. Externally there was a granite 
basement from which rose walls of hard brick marked by 
pilasters that were capped, and that bore a simple entablature. 
The slated roof remains, but an open cupola of a base and 
eight Ionic pillars bearing a dome and containing the bell, was 
removed in 1852. Broad wooden steps led up to a platform 
and three doors in the front (towards the Square).^ 

Rev. W. I. Budington was ordained April 22, 1840. He, as 
he told the writer near the close of his life, came determined 
with all his young enthusiasm — that never left him — to de- 
vote himself to the old church. He wrote its history, and on 
his return from a tour in Europe, for which leave and some- 
thing more were given, advocated a remodelling and some con- 
formity to Christian art. A costly but commonplace design, 
furnished by one then in fashion, was happily discarded, and 
Alexander R. Esty, a man of ideas and then young, was em- 
ployed. His design, somewhat in Norman forms, was adopted. 
The only tower in the town was built, with an unusually pic- 
turesque belfry story ; round heads were given tlic windows ; 
a chancel northward was added ; a fine arcade of five arches 

* No exact view is known to the wiiter. A wood-cut (Hist, of C, p. 133) is 
imperfect in details, but the general form is shown. 



PLACES OF PUBLIC WORSHIP. 55 

supporting a groined ceiling, and three arches before the chan- 
cel, were constructed inside ; and new pews, organ, and pulpit 
were added. Jan. 6, 1853, the new, and existing, house was 
dedicated. 

In 1868 Miss Charlotte Harris gave a chime of sixteen 
bells, commemorative of her ancestors and family, Devens and 
Harris, who were long connected with the Church and Parish, 
as some of her relatives have been to the present time. 

In 1870, repairs and renewals becoming needed, they were 
quite extensively made, and Oct. 2d the house was reopened.. 
By vote of the Parish, the matter of coloring was left with the 
writer, and polychrome was used, not to the extent he might 
wish, but to an extent then novel in this region, and according 
to available funds ; for the Parish, suiting his advice for many 
years, considered a file of bills paid a better offering to the 
Lord than a nice little list of notes payable. If the design of 
the interior, good as it is, must perforce be carried out in the 
vicious American fashion of lath and plaster, there is not 
much bad art in the simple, expressive coloring. No rubbish 
of sham panels, pilasters, and scrolls, dishonors the walls, 
and instead of a sham Bible or cross daubed back of the 
pulpit, as some folks like, there is, in bright gold, the emblem 
of heavenly glory, a great monogram of the name before 
which every knee shall bow, expressed in letters such as the 
Apostles used in their writing, and the early confessors put 
on the tombs of the martyrs. 

In the basement there are neatly finished lecture and com- 
mittee rooms ; the exterior of the building is painted dark 
brown ; and the whole (1887) was never in better order. A 
good iron fence encloses the premises, that are wholly inso- 
lated, and contain grass-ground, together with some trees and 
shrubs, — the only example in town of an English church-green. 

May 12, 1801, the Baptists dedicated their house, the second 
in the town, a wooden one, 75 by 50 feet, with a two-storied 
cupola at the west end, placed at the head of Salem Street on 
land given by 0. Holden. A considerable number of members 
withdrew in 1809, but kept the house, and, in 1810, the older 
body built a brick house, 60 by 46 feet, " and only about 16 



56 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

feet in height," on Austin Street. This building was enlarged 
in 1830, and in 1843 was replaced by a new one of brick, 
built nearly on the same site but fronting Lawrence Street. 
Its exterior is covered with brown mastic, and there is a tall 
wooden steeple without a tower. Internally, it has been re- 
modelled, and now something of the Basilica form and style 
appears, without side galleries and with two rows of pillars 
bearing a low, arched ceiling. The edifice is bounded on three 
sides by streets, and at the rear by houses. 

In 1810, says Dr. Bartlett, " A Universal meeting-house, 62 
feet long, 62 feet wide, and 34 feet high, was built with brick. 
It is commodious and handsomely finished." Feb. 27th of the 
next year, the " First Universalist Society " was incorporated. 
It was the third prominent Religious Society in the town, and 
was destined to become one of the most important of its de- 
nomination. Its original house, of the old hall form, redeco- 
rated on the inside, painted a pale olive color on the outside, 
and surmounted by a large and high square belfry at the west- 
erly end, is still its place of worship, standing detached on the 
Society's ground near Thompson Square (Plan IV.). 

The Unitarian, or Second Congregational Society, incorpo- 
rated Feb. 9, 1816, has been called the Harvard Church since 
1837. Its house, built of brick, dedicated Feb. 10, 1819, still 
in good order, measures 71 by 67 feet on the inside, and has in 
front a square tower bearing a handsome steeple of wood. 
Except in the latter, that follows the school of Wren — the 
favorite when it was designed — and that has two stories with 
Corinthian and Composite pillars and entablatures surmounted 
by the spire, the exterior is plain and Avithout architectural 
features. The interior shows the hall plan, with galleries on 
three sides, a flat ceiling with an elaborate centre-piece of stucco, 
and two rows of square-headed windows. While in it there is 
nothing ecclesiastical, as the word has meant for over a dozen 
centuries, this interior, although changed (1859) still gives some 
valuable evidence of the taste and habits of the time when it 
was built. The extensive alterations, not all of which were 
improvements, that were made, included new pews, and a pulpit 
in a recess within a plain and not beautiful addition made to 



PLACES OF PUBLIC WOESHIP. 57 

the northerly end of the house. Mural commemorative in- 
scriptions and monuments are very scarce in the town, but of 
them there arc in this meeting-house two that honor those who 
erected them, as well as Rev. Dr. Walker and Rev. Thos. Pren- 
tiss, to whose memory they were raised. The former, placed 
at the side of the pulpit towards Wood Street, and dedicated 
Jan. 14, 1883, is a work of considerable size and elaboration. 
Renaissance in style, showing a portrait bust beneath an arch, 
flanked by inscriptions. Unlike six out of the nine Protestant 
places of worship here, this house has no. rooms beneath it, 
but in place of them it has a cellar used during many years for 
storage and business, and making it the only religious edifice 
used for such purposes. A separate building for lectures and 
minor meetings, the Boylston Chapel, stands in a court at some 
distance (Plan IV.). 

The Baptists' meeting-house of 1801, sold (for $1,850) by 
order of Court (1815), was used for a short time (1817-19) 
by the Unitarian congregation, and subsequently, for many 
years, by the Methodist society. Afterwards it was used as 
an armory, and a public hall, until 1882, when it was demol- 
ished to make way for " The Salem," a large, brick, apartment 
house, in picturesque style, belonging to Thos. Doane. At 
least four places of worship besides these already mentioned 
have also been occupied by the Baptists. Mr. Holden, the 
writer is told, maintained a very small chapel that stood nearly 
opposite the head of Wood Street, and between 1809 and 1823, 
Rev. W. Balfour ministered to a congregation with some pecu- 
liarities of belief. Both of these societies worshipped in pri- 
vate buildings (Dr. B.). In 1844, the High Street Baptist 
Church was formed, and March 5, 1846, dedicated its house, 
opposite the end of Elm Street. It was a plain wooden build- 
ing, afterwards enlarged by the Trinity Methodist society, to 
which it passed, and was burned on Sunday morning, Feb. 10, 
1867. Meanwhile a wooden house had been built for a congre- 
gation in Elm Street, and another, with a steeple, at the Neck, 
near the line of the Eastern railroad. Both of these latter 
have disappeared. January 14, 1850, the Bethesda Baptist 
Church was organized, called since 1851 the Bunker Hill 



58 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

Baptist, which built (1851) a plain wooden house that was 
remodelled (1885) and made much more elaborate, in the 
style sometimes called " Queen Anne." This house has a 
steeple westward, and is bounded on two sides by streets and 
on the other two by dwellings. 

The Methodists, when in the house mentioned above, were 
divided, and another was built (1848) for a second society, on 
the corner of High Street and Monument Square. It is a neat, 
simple, building of brick, the facings of which are pressed, 
relieved by stone trimmings, and is surmounted by a small 
cupola. In 1866, the house was remodelled, and enlarged. 

In 1867, the Trinity Methodist Society set an example that, 
certainly in one matter, ought to be much oftener followed. 
Their house burned Feb. 10th was insubstantial, combustible, 
and, if the truth can be spoken, it was also very ugly. On 
rebuilding, S. J. F. Thayer, architect, furnished designs, and 
a house was built not merely of brick in the customary way, 
but with hollow walls, on which the inside plaster finish was 
laid. The roof, supported by slender pillars and showing its 
frame, had no dangerous garret ; partitions in the basement 
were filled solid ; indeed a nearer approach was made to un- 
inflammable construction than in any other public building 
ever in the town, while, at the same time, one of the largest 
Protestant churches then in the State was made convenient 
and attractive by simple forms of recent eclectic Pointed style. 
On a moonlight night the view of the front from the northeast- 
ward, when the tower, spire, and central gable, are seen at an 
angle, shows, perhaps, the prettiest bit of grouping now in 
the town. 

The Congregationalists once more divided after 1816. In 
1834 the Winthrop Church was formed, and for it, on Union 
Street, was built a brick house somewhat like that of the 
First Church, but plainer, — indeed, to Puritan austerity. In 
1847 land was bought on Green Street (Plan- IV.), and 
March 4, 1849, a new house there was dedicated. It is of 
brick, with a buttressed tower bearing a wooden steeple at the 
N. W. corner. The extreme outside measure is about 100 by 
70 feet, and all parts are painted a dark brown color. There 



^'i; 

,?l* 




PLACES OF PUBLIC WORSHIP. 59 

are lecture and other rooms in the basement, on the floor 
above which are sittings for a large congregation, such as has 
always been gathered here. The old native hall form, with 
the galleries on three sides appears, but, like the exterior, de- 
signed in the style of the earlier period of the Gothic Revival, 
an arched ceiling, a little more acute than the usual Tudor 
arch, being the chief feature. In the decoration, polychrome 
to a moderate extent was introduced in 1880, and in a recess 
behind the pulpit is a high, black walnut reredos of unusual 
elegance. There are no grounds attached to the edifice. 

The Episeojjaliaiis of the town, formally gathered Jan., 1840, 
at first held services in the Town Hall. In 1841 they built 
and dedicated ^i!^. John's Church, a brick edifice with a front 
of dark granite ashlar, having a low, square tower, standing at 
the corner of Richmond Street and Bow (now Devens) Street. 
Here also the taste of the earlier period of the Gothic Revival 
was shown in a building of the old hall form. A picturesque 
wooden chapel was erected (1873, Ware and Van Brunt archi- 
tects), on adjoining land bought by the Parish, and (1877, A. 
C. Martin, architect) extensive alterations and improvements 
were made inside the church. There the fittings are neat, and 
recently added chancel furniture is good and appropriate. 
Conspicuous behind the altar is the only memorial window of 
stained glass in the town, placed there in memory of Peter 
Hubbell, for many years the efficient senior warden, who died 
in January, 1871. In aspect and condition this church was 
never better than at present. 

Of the Roman communion there were few persons in the 
town until about half a century after the rebuilding, but sub- 
sequently the number has increased until it has become large. 
Their first church, on Richmond Street, was dedicated to St. 
Mary in May, 1829. Notwithstanding the conservative regard 
for established forms characteristic of the great organization 
represented here, the old local hall, with its galleries on three 
sides, was built, partly for the same reasons of wants and means 
that affected the early settlers. St. Mary's is a plain brick 
building, 45 by 133 feet (a considerable addition to the original 
length having been made a few years ago), with two light, open 



60 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

cupolas on brick bases at the front, but with no architectural 
features. The interior shows scrolls and patterns in fresco on 
the walls and ceiling, a new altar, and several paintings. This 
church becoming utterly insufficient in size for a rapidly in- 
creasing congregation, another was erected on the summit of 
Bunker Hill, on the site of the British redoubt, and beside the 
Catholic burial-ground. Walls, 74 by 150 feet, of blue stone 
with granite trimmings, and a spire 181 feet high, rising from 
a gable at the front, form a substantial edifice that is conspicu- 
ously seen for a great distance. Internally, it shows a nave 
with slender pillars, lateral galleries, and a chancel, the light 
coming through two rows of low-pointed windows at the sides. 
June 17, 1862, it was dedicated to St. Francis de Sales, who 
was canonized in 1665. He was " of a noble family of Savoy," 
and (1602-22) a distinguished bishop of Geneva. It is nota- 
ble that two of the remaining four hills of the peninsula are 
closely associated with men of that one distant city, — John 
Calvin, who died in 1564, with the First Church, on Town Hill, 
and this great exemplar of the ancient ritual with the actual 
Bunker Hill. In 1887, still larger numbers of attendants 
made it necessary to build two more churches. At the junc- 
tion of Corey and Vine streets, the corner stone of one was 
laid (July 31) dedicated to St. Catharine of Sienna. It is of 
brick, with freestone trimmings, in modified Romanesque style, 
and measures outside 156 x 98 feet, and has a tower with a 
short spire 112 feet high. The other, or new St. Mary's, a 
massive and expensive edifice, at the corner of Warren and 
Winthrop streets, will be 153|- X 81 feet, and also be of brick, 
but a large amount of granite will be used. There will be a 
tower, ultimately crowned by a spire 180 feet high. The style 
will be a modern form of Pointed. 

Note. — Of Christian Art, as known to the world for fifteen centuries, 
it is interesting to review what this prosperous New England town has at 
the end of two and a half centuries. The feeling of the founders has 
prevailed throughout, for while houses are commodious, and are now, as 
they were not in early days, comfortable or even luxurious, there is very 
little real Art. The First Church has the one interior designed on eccle- 
siastical lines, but the execution is American, in lath and plaster. It has, 



INSTITUTIONS OF BENEVOLENCE. 61 

also, the first mural monument in the town raised since the Revolution, a 
large slab commemorative of the ministers before that period, prepared at 
the desire, and by the care, of the Rev. Dr. Budington. The Harvard 
church has the one sculptured monument of this kind (p. .57). St. John's 
has the one memorial window of stained glass, besides good altar furniture 
(p. 59) ; and the Winthrop has an elegant reredos of tracery in Pointed 
style, executed in black walnut. Altar paintings, not numerous on the 
European scale, are found in the Catholic churches. Of architectural 
features in carved stone, there is scarcely a trace; of mosaic there is none; 
in the First Church there is some terra cotta; and a large chime of bells, 
also there, might be added to this list. Charlestown is, however, not ex- 
ceptionally poor in Art for an American place of its size. 



INSTITUTIONS OF BENEVOLENCE. 

Funds for educational, benevolent, and religious purposes 
have long existed in the town, but only in recent times have 
there been buildings that represented any of them. The old 
Church funds were in land and notes (in 1788, 32 acres, and 
£174:. 7. 4). The Charlestown Poor's Fund, originating at 
least as early as 1674 in the bequest of Richard Russell 
(£200.), was increased by that of Capt. Richard Sprague 
(equal, 1749, to $460, silver), of Mr. Rand (£38. 12), and of 
Thos. Call (1772, 188.89). After the Revolution it was, from 
time to time, still more increased, until now, counting the se- 
curities at par, it amounts to $23,800. 

The Free Scliool Fund, dating from 1647 and 1660, when 
lands were set apart for the purpose, also grew by degrees, 
so that, in a report to a Town meeting, Dec, 1792, it was 
"prized" at £861.12.1. After that time slight additions 
were made, and money for free education was raised by taxa- 
tion. Other funds, more or less public, and for special or less 
general objects, also exist. 

Of institutions occupying buildings wholly devoted to their 
use, one, of which the germ appears at perhaps the earliest 
date, although both name and development are recent, is the 
Young Men's Christian Association. As far back as 1739 
there was a " Society of Young Men in Charlestown, who 
[were] United together for the Exercises of Religion on the 
Lord's Day Evenings," to whom the Rev. Hull Abbot preached 



62 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

(July 8) a sermon on Early Piety, The modern form of the 
institution was, however, long afterwards organized. In June, 
1853, the Young Men's Evangelical Union was begun, with 
members from the two Trinitarian Congregational, three Bap- 
tist, two Methodist, the Bethesda, and St. John's churches. It 
owed " its origin to the late philanthropic movement in all our 
large cities, to rescue and aid young men constantly coming 
. . . from the interior," who " stand much in need of fellow- 
ship and assistance," says the preface to its By-laws. Through 
changes an organization with similar purpose, although with 
enlarged or modified forms, has continued, and now occupies a 
large wooden building developed from that of the Seminary on 
Union Street. It was paid for by subscription, and in it a 
reading-room, and a hall with an organ and a stage for lectures 
or evening amusements are provided. 

In 1833 the Infant School Society opened its school at 6 
Warren Street, and in 1834 was incorporated. For many 
years (1834-70) it maintained a (wooden) house on Richmond 
Street, and took care of young children. To this name that of 

Children's Home was added in 1869, and a larger and better 
building (also wooden) on Austin Street, has been owned and 
supported by members of the Protestant societies. Its objects 
are commendable, and justly its condition is prosperous. In 
connection with it are especially associated the labors and 
name of Miss Mary D. Balfour. 

A still larger institution, now supported by funds (834,092 
in 1886) and by general contributions, and managed in a simi- 
lar manner, originated (1865) in a bequest (valued at $10,000) 
by an old resident, and from her receives its name of The 

Winchester Home for Aged Women. Of these beneficiaries 
there were in 1886 thirty-five, aged from 61 to 89. At first 
the three-storied wooden house long occupied by Jas. K. Froth- 
ingham was used, but as more room was wanted, a picturesque 
building was erected (1872-73) on adjacent land. It has two 
stories and a high basement of red brick, a so-called French 
roof with another good story, and a flattened pyramidal bit of 
roof to accent the centre. The architect was S. J. F. Thayer, 
and the whole cost about $45,000, obtained by subscriptions 
and bequests. 



INSTITUTIONS OP BENEVOLENCE. 63 

Until April, 1872, " Charlestown, with its thirty thousand 
inhabitants, was without any organization, excepting that of 
the overseers of the poor, for the ready medical and surgical 
relief of the sick and maimed poor," wrote the Rev. C. E. Grin- 
nell, chairman of a meeting called by Dr. E. J. Forster, who was 
then chosen superintendent of an institution incorporated Feb., 
1873, as the Charlestown Free Dispetisar^/ and Hospital. With 
a small fund, but chiefly supported by annual subscriptions, 
it continues to do good work, attending annually to about 
a thousand cases, rather less than half of which are with 
patients of foreign birth, although most of them are of foreign 
parentage. 

Other societies, but without special buildings, have also been, 
from time to time, formed for benevolent purposes. As early as 
1802, the Rev. Dr. Morse and associates formed what was prac- 
tically a germ of the more modern Tract Societies. " There 
can be little doubt," says S. E. Morse (1867), "tliat in 1802, 
the pastor and people of the First Parish in Charlestown had 
done more in circulating religious tracts among the poor and 
destitute in the United States, than any other people in New 
England." It would be difficult now to find or make up a set 
of the works thus distributed, but there were 32,600 copies of 
19 tracts. In 1813, ninety-nine persons of all classes and be- 
liefs formed the Charlestown Association for the Refo7'mation 
of 3Iorals, an object for which extraordinary means were then 
thought necessary. The Rev. Dr. Morse, foremost in the good 
works of the town, was the chairman. Six years later (Nov. 1, 
1819) the Female Benevolent Society was formed, the name 
Devens being substituted for Female, Dec. 26, 1856. Its mem- 
bers are chiefly of the Universalist Society, and its object is to 
provide clothing for the needy. The Mechanic Union Charita- 
hle Association was incorporated in 1839, and in 1853 was 
formed the Bunker Hill Mutual Loan and Fund Association. 

The modern form of religious ministration known as the 
City Missionary, was begun by the organization, Dec, 1843, of 
the Charlestown Citi/ 31ission and Tract Society, composed of 
members " of all the Evangelical Churches of the Town," the 
directors being the minister and one layman from each of eight 



64 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

churches. The first president was Capt., afterwards Commo- 
dore, J. B. Montgomery, a member of the First Church. In 
1851, the operations of the Society were made more compre- 
hensive, and these continued for a considerable period. Mean- 
while, in 1846 (April 19), the Unitarians began a similar work 
called the Ministry at Large^ that was continued until 1879, the 
Rev. 0. C. Everett being most of the time, and indeed the chief, 
minister (Oct. 1, 1850, to Aug., 1869). For this enterprise 
the wooden Harvard chapel, costing 810,000, built on Edge- 
worth Street, was dedicated Feb. 12, 1856. It was sold at 
auction July 31, 1879. 

During the Civil War, Charlestown, in work for the help and 
comfort of those under arms, was honorably represented by 
the Bunker Hill Soldiers Relief Society, originated April 19, 
1861. Naturally, and very properly, it was neither sectarian 
nor partisan, and hard and nobly worked the many ladies, its 
members. 

Mrs. H. G. Hutchins was the first President ; Mrs. \V. L. Hudson, 
V. P. ; INIrs. H, Lyon, Sec. ; Miss A. B. Bates, Treas. 
They were helped by funds as follows, from 

Bunker Hill Ass'?, California, 

James Huunewell, Charlestown, 

From all other sources, 

H975.78 $3,647.66 

In the Roman Catholic churches there have been large and 
efficient organizations for their members. The Mutual Relief 
Society of St. Mary's was instituted January, 1834, and incor- 
porated March 1, 1844 ; the Father Matthew Mutual Benevo- 
lent Total Abstinence Society, also of St. Mary's, dates from 
August 30, 1849, and the St. Francis de Sales Church Debt 
Society from 1879. The latter proved one of the greatest 
successes of the kind in the history of the town. 

A large number of organizations into which benevolent 
work enters exist also in the Lodges, Orders, and other pri- 
vate associations. 

If not Benevolent Societies, the old Fire Societies were 
formed and maintained for the public or social good, and may 
properly be mentioned here. There were three organized 



1862-63 


1863-64 


^2,735.50 


$743.65 


500.00 


500.00 


1,740.28 


2,404.01 



MILITARY COMPANIES. 65 

after the Revolution, — the Phoenix (1795), the Washington^ 
(1800), and the Jefferson (1810). The oldest was, however, 
the Ancient,"'^ instituted Nov. 8, 1743, composed of house- 
holders acting for mutual protection or aid, and maintained 
until paid public companies took the place of such early and 
more restricted associations. The number of members was 
limited to 25, one of whom was clerk and treasurer. Candi- 
dates stood proposed three months, and two negatives on a 
ballot excluded. Each member was obliged to keep two 
leather buckets, two bags (1^ X | yd.) with his name on 
them, and a bed-key and belt, and, on notice of a fire, must 
" repair with his buckets, bags, and key, to the place where it 
happens" (Rules, p. 5), and " use his best endeavors" to save 
property of the members. 

A pair of leather buckets that belonged to James Hunne- 
well, who joined the Society soon after his final return from 
the Pacific, still hangs a few yards from the writer's desk, a 
reminder of an old and necessary, but now disused, custom. 
A few rods distant, in notable contrast, is the incomparably 
equipped station, and the efficient professional corps of the 
Fire Department of the present. 



MILITARY COMPANIES. 

While the steps of the British troops, when they left Charles- 
town in 1776, were the last by hostile forces on its ground, and 
while since then peace has been permanent within it, the mili- 

1 From a copy of the Constitution, witli 37 PP- ^^^' added, owned by the 
writer, it appears that there were 25 members, whose names, occupations, and 
residences are given, 

2 The writer's list of members, 1743 to 1832, contains the names of owners of 
many of the most prominent estates in the town, and as the whole is early and 
rare, the names of the founders may well be here given : — 

Jas. Flucker (clerk) ; Thaddeus Mason ; Ezekiel Cheever, Jr. ; John Foy ; 
John Sprague ; William Ford ; John Leppington ; Edward Sheaffe ; Isaac Foster ; 
Isaac Johnson ; Joseph Austin Nathaniel Gorham ; David Wyer ; James Russell ; 
Richard Dane ; Samuel Bradstreet ; Richard Foster, Jr. ; John Stevens ; Samuel 
Henley ; John Codraan ; John White ; Peter Edes ; John Breed ; Chambers 
Russell ; Samuel Dowse. 



66 A CENTUKY OF TOWN LIFE. 

tary history of the place did not by any means end, even if it 
may be said to have culminated, in the battle of Bunker Hill. 
Peaceful and safe as the place has been nearly all the time 
since its settlement, the risks of the earlier years, and even of 
the Provincial period, made troops desirable, and, indeed, neces- 
sary ; and subsequent exigencies, down to our own day, have 
shown the wisdom of having some good military organization. 
For service in " King Philip's War," at Louisburg, in the Rev- 
olution, the war of 1812, the Mexican War, and that for the 
Union, — especially the last, — Charlestown has furnished men. 
For the first, " one of its citizens, Capt. Samuel Hunting, raised 
a company of ' Praying Indians,' which mustered here " (1675), 
says Mr. Frothingham, and (1676) " having some English in 
it, performed efficient service." Citizens also enlisted, or were 
impressed, in other companies. As early as 1686, Rev. Cotton 
Mather preached (Sep. 13) at an Artillery Election held here, 
" a very good Discourse," wrote Judge Sewall, who adds that 
the " Company had like to have been broken up ; the animosity 
so high between Charlestown and Cambridge Men about the 
Place of Training." In Col. Thos. Gardner's Middlesex Regi- 
ment, at Bunker's Hill, was a company under Capt. Josiah 
Harris, raised in Charlestown. It did good service on the 
bank of the Mystic, at the left flank of the Provincial line, 
and was " the last to retreat." Along with the rebuilding of 
the. town occurred the formation of the Artillery Company ^ 
(1786), and two more companies were added to the militia in 
1801, — the Warren Phalanx, and the Light Infantry. The 
former is continued ; the latter two lasted about forty years ; 
and the Columbian Guards half as long, dating from 1818. 
In 1850, the City Guards were organized, and they had an 
active career, as also have had the Cadets, organized in 1864. 
Besides these were the Jackson Guards (Co. G, 9th Reg.), 



^ Capt., Wm. Calder; Capt.-Lieut., Solomon Phipps ; 1st Lieut., Windsor 
Jones ; 2d, Sam'. Morse. In 1797, 1st brigade, 3d div. Art. Battalion, with Capt., 
David Goodwin. 1802, Capt., John Carter, Jr. ; 1805, Joseph Reed. 1805, 1st 
brigade, 3d div. Reg. of Art., Capt, Andrew Roulston ; John Farley, 1812 ; John 
Sweetser, 1814 ; and many since. The Co. is now in the 9th Regiment, with 
Edward Eagan captain. 










THE POWDER HOUSE 



OTHER PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 67 

dating from 1855, and the Prescott Light Guards (Co. C, 1st 
Batt. Cavalry) dating from 1863. During the war for the 
Union, Charlestown furnished its full share of soldiers. In 
addition to those scattered in a great many companies, no 
small number in the aggregate, they largely composed other 
companies. For 3 months' service (May-July, 1861) in the 
Fifth Regiment, there were in Co. C, 41 ; in K, 66 ; for 100 
days (186^4), in Co. D, 72 ; in H, 58 ; for 9 months (Sep., 1862, 
to July, 1863) in Co. A, 86 ; in D, 89 ; in H, 95 ; while in the 
Forty-seventh there were 85 in Co. E. For 3 years (from 
July, 1863) there were 124 in Co. I, of the Thirty-second, and 
(from July, 1862) 95 in Co. B, of the Thirty-sixth Infantry. 
(For Eegimental Histories, see pp. 276, 277.) Since the war 
there have been organizations of the Grand Army for veterans ; 
and for the young, who are likely to learn what a long future 
has in store, there are the High School Cadets. 



OTHER PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

The one existing public work of the town that can be called 
ancient, is the Powder House, near the corner of the road to 
Arlington and that between Cambridge and Medford, on land 
now in Somerville ; indeed it is almost the only such work of 
the Provincial times to be found throughout a wide region. 
Its walls, built of rough broken stones, perhaps 80 ft. high, 
form, as measured by the writer (April 15, 1886), a nearly 
exact circle 60| feet in circumference on the outside. At the 
one door (towards the north) they are 2|- feet thick, and the 
diameter of the interior directly thence is 14 ft., 2 in. Both 
outside and inside they curve slightly inward towards the top, 
which is covered by a tall conical wooden and shingled roof 
with curved outlines. Across the interior, until recently, there 
were heavy beams, and flooring, all of late broken, but these 
have been removed, leaving the whole space clear ; the floor is 
the earth ; the doorway unclosed, as also is a window oppo- 
site ; and the interior is dirty. Otherwise the structure is in 
tolerably good condition. Its roof was painted, and its walls 



68 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

were whitewashed on the outside, a few years ago. The site 
appears to have belonged to Richard Lowden, one of the ear- 
liest inhabitants (1638), whose executor sold it (1703) to 
Jon' Fosket, and he (1703) to John Mallet, from whose son's 
widow it passed (1747) to Michael Mallet. Of the latter, W" 
Foye, Treas. of the Province, bought (1747) the " stone edifice, 
formerly a windmill," with a lot, ^ of an acre square, the mill 
being in the centre. After the Revolution (?) it seems to have 
passed to Peter Tufts, and has been held by Nathan Tufts and 
his descendants. From the time it was built (probably before 
1710) the edifice was for many years a widely known grist-mill, 
and then, for a much longer period, was a storehouse for all, 
or a great part of, the powder belonging to the Province and 
the State. 

There is probably no other existing monument of the open- 
ing of the American Revolution as entire, old, and important 
as this Powder-House. It has been preserved chiefly by pri- 
vate care, but will probably sometime be kept by more secure 
and permanent tenure than anything private can be under our 
institutions. The event that gives it a notable place in the 
history of the United States is described in the " Essex Ga- 
zette," Sep. 6, 1774, p. 2: — 

"Boston, Monday, September 5. On Wednesday last the new 
Divan (consisting of the wretched Fugitives with whom the just in- 
dignation of their respective Townsmen, by a well deserved expulsion, 
have filled this Capital), usurped the Seats round the Council Board in 
Boston. Their deliberations have not hitherto transpired, and with 
equal secresy, on Thursday morning at half after Four, about 260 
Troops embarked on board 13 boats at the Long- Wharf and proceeded 
up Medford Elver, to Temple's Farm, where they landed, and went 
to the Powder-House, on Quarry-hill, in Charlestown bounds, whence 
they have taken 250 half barrels of powder, the whole store, and 
carried it to the castle." 

The account published in Boston is briefer : — 

" This Morning a Party of the Troops proceeded to Charlestown, 
and took Possession of the Powder in the Powder-House there, and 
are now conveying it round to Boston, in Waggons, and then pro- 
ceeded to Medford Powder House for the like Purpose." (Mass. 
Gazette, Sep. 1, 1774, p. 2.) 



OTHER PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 69 

Ammunition 'was as precious as cash to the Provincials, and 
the seizure of it here had an exceptional importance, making 
this raid especially momentous as an opening event in the 
struggle for national life. 

While ground that once belonged to Charlestown still bears 
an old, and almost unique, preserved historical monument, it 
also bears an American rarity, a ruin, — a slight fragment, in- 
deed, but half a century old, — the relic of a Convent. In 
1820 an extensive tract of land, including the Ploughed Hill 
of Revolutionary times, was secured, and on it Drs. Matignon 
and Cheverus, " with funds given by a native citizen of Bos- 
ton," founded this institution. Six years later its community, 
of the Order of St. Ursula, which was established in 1536, 
came to town and occupied a farm-house at the foot of the 
hill, " until the main building on its summit was finished," as 
it was in 1827. The education of girls was one of the pur- 
poses of the Order, and accordingly a Seminary for them was 
here opened. Its reputation " was widely extended, and the 
number of pupils from all the New England, and from many 
of the Southern States, and the British Provinces, rapidly in- 
creased ; so that in the year 1829, it was found necessary to 
add two large wings to the building." (Report, 1834.) The 
only Roman service that the Protestant scholars were required 
to attend was the Latin mass on Sunday in the chapel. (Ace, 
1834, p. 16.) At different times there were from four to ten 
or twelve nuns, and from forty to sixty pupils. Various re 
ports, that appear to have been unfounded or exaggerated, 
were circulated about doings in the Convent, until on the even- 
ing of Aug. 11, 1834, a mob attacked and burned the build- 
ing, after dispersing its inmates (12 nuns, and 57 girls, some 
of the latter quite young). Great excitement existed before and 
after the event, and a considerable number of now rare pub- 
lications relate to it (Bib., p. 57). While the building was left 
a wreck, considerable fragments stood many years afterwards, 
but now (1887) only the lowest portion of the basement is left, 
in some places scarcely above the surface of the ground ; but 
the form and size of the building can still be clearly determined, 
as, if the destruction continues, they cannot be a few years hence. 



70 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

Measurements were made by the writer, and J. M. H., April 12, 
1886. The basement walls, 20 in. thick at the bottom, were 
built of split slate stone laid in common lime mortar, and 
above them were 16 in. walls of red brick. The building 
seems to have stood directly on the natural surface of the 
ground, without a cellar except a small one at the west end, 
much of the outer side of it being above ground, so that it was 
entered there by a wide door, a fragment of one jamb still re- 
maining. The main part of the Convent, surmounted by a 
cupola, was three, the other parts two, stories high, and the 
style appears to have been very simple. In front there was a 
large circular garden, with little paths and thickly set clusters 
of small shrubs, all still shown by remains. Towards the 
Winter Hill road there was a high, steep slope with terraces, 
along which curved a driveway, while on the other hand there 
was an abrupt descent towards Medford turnpike, from which 
the Convent grounds were separated by the Middlesex Canal. 
From the front and rear extended the broad, slightly " crown- 
ing " top of the ridge-like hill, commanding, as it now does 
except due east, a very wide and noble prospect. 

No other public buildings now of the town, besides some of 
the places of worship, are over thirty years old, or without 
important change made within that period. Few historical or 
personal associations are consequently gathered around them, 
and, furthermore, by their designs they do not to any great 
degree illustrate the history of American art, of moderate 
length as that is ; and although somewhat expensive, they can, 
with few exceptions, hardly be called works of any form of 
real art. Much more in them are shown the influences of the 
early days, making practical use, rather than monumental or 
artistic expression, their characteristic. Of a cost far beyond 
any tried, or dreamed of, here generations ago, partly built of 
materials more substantial than any that the times then made 
possible, they yet show noticeably the old precedent of inflam- 
mable construction. The traditions of lath and plaster, of 
wooden stairs, floors, and roofs, are followed, with a subservi- 
ency not exclusively Chinese or Charlestonian. 

Inadequate accommodations for Town offices and secular 



OTHER PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 71 

gatherings of the people, in over thirty years, made a building 
for both wanted. Accordingly in 1818 a Town Hall was built 
on the Square (Plan I., 2). It was of good size, three stories 
high, — a tall basement of cut granite, two stories of red brick, 
— and had a roof sloped four ways. Along the middle there 
was a ridgepole, from which ran a depressed gable towards the 
front, and at the centre of the edifice rose a white wooden 
cupola. The style was simple but dignified, with slight at- 
tempt at architectural features. On the first floor were shops, 
on the second was a hall of good size, with large square- 
headed windows on each side, plain walls covered with " mar- 
bled" paper, and a plain whitewashed ceiling supported by half 
a dozen Roman Doric pillars of wood painted to suggest an 
imaginary motley yellow marble. The best hall the Town 
lias had for nearly two and a half centuries, it stood forty 
years and was the scene of many a lively Town meeting, of 
Fairs that of course did a great deal of good, of the earliest 
" classic " concerts heard in the place, of series of Lyceum 
lectures, and other events. In it, on these occasions, often 
met, one time and 'another, all of old Charlestown now 
nearly vanished. 

Again were larger municipal accommodations wanted. In 
1868 the old building was torn down, and the City Hall, a 
higher building, of red brick with brownstone and painted 
wooden trimmings, was erected on the same area, but with a 
wing on Harvard Street added (making the whole 100 x 87 ft.). 
Although it contains several large rooms, there is no hall. In 
the wing are the Police court and headquarters, together with 
cells, that, except two large safes or strong rooms, are the most 
substantial parts of the edifice. On the inside there is scarcely 
any attempt at architectural style or features ; on the outside 
most of the finish is said to be in Italian Renaissance, but it is 
of a kind hard to find in Italy. Most of the structure is cov- 
ered by a so-called French roof, the central part being sur- 
mounted by an octagonal wooden and slated dome, that rises 
from a square base. Since annexation the second floor of the 
main part has been occupied by the Public Library. Here, 
besides books, are nearly all the works of art in the town that 



72 



A CENTUPwY OF TOWN LIFE. 



are public property.^ The edifice was dedicated June 17, 1869, 
and cost 1111,200. 

Next in importance are the School Houses, High and Gram- 
mar, all of which are built of red brick with more or less of 
stone trimmings. Their cost, size, and order according to age 
are stated below. 

Note. 





Built. 




Size. 


Cost. 


Architect. 


Harvard (Plan I.) 


*1801 






^3,220 




rebuilt (do.) 


t 1847-8 


54 


X 64 






new (do.) 


§1872 


90i 


X94 


130,285 


S. J. F. Thayer. 


Bunker Hill (B. H. St.) 


1805 


36 


X 25 


1,000 




rebuilt 


1845 










new (Baldwin St.) 


§ 1866-7 


60i 


X92J 


65,862 


J. H. Rand. 


Winthrop (Tr. field) 


*1827 


56 


X 32 


5,859 




new (B. Hill St.) 




72 


X42 






Warren (Salem St.) 


t 1839-40 


60 


X40 


15,000 


G. J. F. Bryant. 


new (do.) 


§1868 


61 


X90 


69,500 


J. H. Rand. 


High (Mont, Sq.) 


t 1847-8 






26,000 


A. B. Young. 


new (do.) 


§1870 


75J 


X75 


87,000 


S. J. F. Thayer. 


Prescott 


§1857 


84 


X60 


36,500 


Towle. 


Frothingham 


§ 1875-6 


119 


X90 


128,454 


G. A. Clough. 


ries; t do. and basement 


; § 3 stories 


and do.; J 3 stories. 


Dimensions, like 



some other items, are not usually found in the published Reports. 

Of these buildings, the third Winthrop (now the Frothing- 
ham), is the most picturesque, and perhaps the most satisfactory, 
and shows the nearest approacli to a defined architectural style. 
It is in what is called modern Gothic, is trimmed with sandstone 
and black bricks, and has gables and grouped windows. Mayor 
Cobb, at the dedication (Apr. 6, 187G), said that " it cost far 
less than any recent building of its class in [Boston], and is 
inferior to none of them in the extent of its accommodations," 
and in its sanitary appliances. The city had already borrowed 
two and a half millions that were spent on school-houses, some 
of them demolished long before the debt on them was paid. A 
new way was, however, followed here, and " this house, together 
with the land it stands on," was fully paid for out of the tax 
levy. In connection with these statements it is curious to 

^ Paintings : Full length portraits of D. Webster (by John Pope), given by 
citizens, 1853 ; Geo. Washington, after Stuart, by J. Frothingham (his scholar, 
and a native of C), do., 1858 ; Andrew Jackson, by A. C. Hoit, 1855, after Van- 
derlyn, 1819, given by Jacob Foss and others, 1855 (all once hung in the old Town 
Hall) ; and (f length) Richard Devens, by H. Sargent, 1798, betpeathed by Miss 
C. Harris ; also, by S. F. B. ilorse, an historical painting. 



PLACES OF AMUSEMENT. 73 

notice that this one school building cost about eleven times 
as much as did all the Grammar school buildings standing in 
Charlestown in 1834. The Harvard ranks perhaps next, ar- 
chitecturally, and although not in one of the older recognized 
styles, and capped by a massive cornice of painted wood, it has 
a look of dignity. The High School building, while also show- 
ing an attempt to realize something new in effect and detail, is 
a pretty good one. Of the other large structures of this class 
in town, it may be said that while they are rather plain, and 
do not teach much in art or beauty, they may be fairly consid- 
ered superior to not a few of their date, and even more costly, 
seen in the country. The primary school-houses, it should be 
added, are, while smaller and plainer, both neat and convenient. 
The number of scholars in the Charlestown schools, in 1886, 
averaged according to the Report, 2,241 primary (49 teachers), 
and 3,065 grammar (59 teachers), or a total of 5,306 scholars 
with 108 teachers. 



PLACES OF AMUSEMENT. 

Turning from instruction to amusement we fmd that build- 
ings for the latter can be briefly described. There are none. 
The town never had a theatre or a concert-room, yet it has 
occasionally been favored by visits of a circus. For entertain- 
ments of the sort provided by the last, there was a comparatively 
permanent structure of boards and canvas that stood near the 
southeasterly corner of the Waverley House before and after 
1828. It was called the " Charlestown Circus," and there old 
citizens speak of having seen the " Forty Thieves " performed 
with live horses as well as actors ; there also was shown H. A. 
Barker's Panorama of the Battle of Paris (1814), " painted on 
3,024 feet of canvas." In the old Town Hall there were con- 
certs and other occasional performances, as also there have 
been at a more recent date in Waverley and Monument Halls, 
in each of wliich, as well as in the Navy Yard, a stage has been 
fitted up, where amateurs have agreeably given plays. Observ- 
ers of the changes in thought and practice will notice that a 
more permanent stage is found in the Hall of the Young Men's 
Christian Association, and used in a similar manner. 



74 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 



MONUMENTS. 



Charlestown still has, honorably preserved, one of those treas- 
uries of family history usually found in the older towns of New- 
England, that, if apt to be of moderate value in art, are sure to 
be of great interest, and an important part of the local records ; 
indeed of the quiet village, or of the place grown to be a city, 
they are apt to be the only chronicles in stone. 

The Old Burial-Ground here is still all this after existing 
through more than two centuries, with their wear and change, 
including as they have the stress of war and risks of hostile 
occupation. Probably within fifteen years of the settlement 
one of the most retired and picturesque spots on the peninsula 
was chosen and used as the last resting-place of the towns- 
people. It was a green little knoll, around two sides of Avhich 
flowed the then clear waters of a bay in the west bank of 
Charles River. There to the scattered stones set up by earlier 
generations more and more were added, until the ground was 
crowded. By degrees the buildings of the increasing town grew 
nearer, and at length pressed close on every side, so that now 
it is quite hemmed in, and, if the truth is said, by objects far 
from beautiful. Yet stones and turf, tombs and some good- 
sized trees, are well kept ; some of the stones are movi?d or gone, 
but on the whole fair care is bestowed on the now scarce used, 
but always precious old place. Around the border curves a nar- 
row carriage road, at the inner side of which, with slight inter- 
ruption for two thirds of the distance, are ranges of brick tombs 
whitewashed ; back of them on the slopes are the thickly set 
stones, among which, here and there, are large altar-shaped mon- 
uments dating from long before the present century, and others 
taller erected later. On the top of the hill is a granite obelisk 15 
feet high, 4 feet square at the base, and 2 feet at the top, put 
there in ] 828 by alumni of Harvard, in memory of the minister 
whose name is borne by their College. " In piam et perpetuam 
memoriam," and other dutiful words, have already crumbled 
from the marble slabs then exposed upon the granite, but the 
memory of the honored pastor is still cherished, and there is 
an opportunity for some one to renew the inscription. 



MONUMENTS. 75 

Few burial-grounds in New England can still show older 
stones. At least six here are before 1670, and several are of 
the first settlers or their children, and some are of persons born, 
or adults, before the town was even thought of, or its site really 
explored. 

Nearly all the earlier stones are short thick slabs of greenish 
slate, often embellished with a death's head, and are remark- 
ably well preserved. A few are red sandstone, that was used 
more, yet not a great deal, during the first half of the last cen- 
tury. Purple slate in larger pieces then superseded both ma- 
terials, and white marble, the least durable of all, came into 
use chiefly in this century. 

In April, 1887, the writer copied the dates of deaths, and the 
names as there spelled, on all, or nearly all, the stones dated 
before 1700. All, early and late, are generally grouped by 
families, and arranged so that they would be on a slope of the 
knoll towards the part of the town where the persons buried 
had lived. In the southeasterly quarter are found Austin, Abi- 
gail, 1693, Richard, 1694; Bacheler, William, 1669 (of red 
sandstone striped with yellow, looking as if brought from the 
west of England) ; Betts, Mary, 1678 ; Bickner, John, 1678 ; 
Baxter, John, 1688, and William, 1691 ; Brackenhury, William, 
1668 (an inhabitant, 1629, and an original grantee), and Dor- 
cas, wife of John (Brakenbery), 1682 ; Beniamin, Joshua, 1684 ; 
Brooke, John, 1687 ; Cary, Hanah, 1672 ; Cutler, John, 1676, 
Margret, 1680, and Margret, 1680 (all on one stone with 
three heads) ; Caswell, Mary, 1705 ; Carter, Ann, 1679, Thomas, 
1694, Esther, 1709 ; Chamherlen, John, 1684 ; Chalkley, Robert, 
1672 ; Cleashy, John, 1695 ; Codman, Beniamin, 1689, Susana, 
1690-1, Hephzibah, 1690-1; Stephen (Codmon), 1706; Cookery, 
Henry, 1704; Davis, Nath^', 1690; Lows, Lawranc, 1692, 
Elizabeth, 1698, Capt. Nathaniel, 1719 ; Elasson, Samuel, 1694 ; 
Foster, William, 1698 ; Gerrish, Henry, 1678 ; Gill, Josiah, 
1708 ; Grifftn, Samuel, 1705-6 ; Hill, Prudence, 1711 ; Hockey, 
Mary, 1678 ; Huchenson, Thomas, 1692 ; Hurd, Jacob, 1694, 
Sarah, 1711, Elizabeth, 1715 ; Jenner, Mabel, 1702, Rebecca, 
1702; Kidder, Mary, 1707; Lee, Rebekah, 1692; Larkin, 
Thomas, 1677, Lydia, 1719 ; Lord, Samuel, 1696 ; Loyd, Han- 



76 A CENTTJEY OF TOWN LIFE. 

nah, 1699 ; Long, John, 1678, Sarah, 1674, Joan, 1691 ; Luke, 
George, 1691 ; Moarton, Anna, 1690 ; Newell, Mary, 1684, 
Margaret, 1689, John and Hannah, 1704 ; Nicholls, Sarah, 1678 ; 
Pay en, Abigail, 1688, Edward (Pain), 1691 ; Parker, Daniel, 
1694, Ann, 1719 ; Penney, Tamizian, 1710 ; Price, Hannah, 
1698 ; Rand, Edmond, 1683, Thomas, 1683, Alice (wife of Rob- 
ert, an inhabitant, 1635), 1691, Sarah, 1699; John, 1712, Me- 
hetabel, 1717; Russell, Richard, 1689; Somers, Henry, 1708 ; 
Slower, Richard (who " arrived 1628," Town Rec), 1693, and 
another, 1693 ; Trumhal, John, 1693, Samuel (Trumball), 1706 ; 
V^pliam, John, 1677 ; Wilson, Sarah, 1689, Mary, 1696. 

Around the top of the hill there are {S. LJ.') Breed, Ebenezer, 
1715 ; Hayman, Grace, 1683 ; loann Jacob, 1681 ; Killen, Han- 
nah, 1690; Linde, Thomas, 1678; Blousel, Thomas, 1713 (£b. 
abt. 81) ; Scott, John (oe. 75), 1681 ; Symmes, Timothy, 1678 ; 
Waite, Lydia, 1700 ; Waldo, Hannah, 1704. 

(*S'. TF".). Alle7i, Thomas, 1694; Aiiderson, John (as. 3 mos.), 
1675; Be7itle, John, 1690, Mary, 1690, Sarah (Bentley), 1692 
(three infant children of Capt. Richard) ; Blaney, Sarah, 1694 ; 
Cary, James, 1681; Elisone, Sarah, 1680; Haiden, Elizabeth, 
1680; Jrtwiso?i, Sarah, 1691; Jones, Isaac, 1683, Thomas (loanes), 
1686 ; Kettell, Mercy, 1692, Ensign Samuel, 1694; Ludkin, An, 
1680, Aron, 1694 ; Newcom, Michael and Anna, 1692 ; Patten, 
William, 1711 ; Stevens,Wi\\\iim, 1702 ; Tarhall, Susanna, 1690; 
Wellsted, Samvel, 1684 ; Wilson, William, 1690, John, 1697. 

(TF.). In a row facing the Harvard obelisk, John Foionell 
(ae. 18), the oldest upright slab, 1654 ; Joanna Conuers (se. 86), 
1672 ; William Bartholomeiv (ae. 78), 1680 ; Mary Greene (ae. 4), 
1666 ; Faithfvl Rowse (a3. 75), 1664. Back of these are Phil- 
lips, Henry, 1680, William, 1687, Capt. Timothy, 1711 (some 
not as old of Larance family) ; Call, Jonathan, 1684, Ann, 1699, 
Waffe, 1703, Hannah, 1708 ; Edmands, Elizabeth, 1678, Daniel 
(Edmans), 1688 ; Kettell, Richard, 1690, Abigail, 1690, Joseph, 
1711 ; Loivden, Samuel, 1682, Mary, 1683, Richard, 1700 (x. 88, 
an inhabitant in 1638); Martin, Capt. Richard, 1694 ; Wayt, 
lohn (a peculiar black slate), 1704-5, lohn (Waite), 1690. 

(iV. IF.). In a front row, Elizabeth Greene, 1680; Caleb 
Greene, 1684; Sarah Ryall, 1688. Back of them, Joseph 



MONUMENTS. 77 

Greene (ae. 4 weeks), 1690 ; Thomas Peirce, 1693 ; lane Pharus 
(£6. 82), 1686; Solomon Phipps,lQ71 (a peculiar black, vol- 
canic-looking stone). On the north side of the path up from 
the gate, Adams, Nicolas, 1685, Ann, 1688, Hannah, 1699; 
Anna KeetteU, 1678 ; Bunker, Beniamin, 1702, Jonathan 
(Bvncker), 1678 (born 1638, in C, son of Geo. who came there 
in 1634). 

On the other slojyes of the knoll (S., S. W., and W.) there are 
fewer stones, but on them (in the direction E. to W.) are the 
following: William Dadey, 1682; Jane Hammond, 1681, and 
Abigail, 1673-4; Beniamin Soleley, 1688; Andrew Stimson, 
1686 ; do., 1683 ; Seth Sweetser (ss. 56), 1662 (these seven are 
near steps from the east) ; James Smith, 1678 ; John Fownell, 
1673 (a black, volcanic-looking stone) ; Mary Hudson, formerly 
his wife, 1676 ; Sarah Robinson,, 1694 ; Stephen Keeder, 1697, 
Ruth Euertun, 1692 ; Samuel 3Iould, 1697, and Edward, 1696 
(two children) ; Amy Peatfild (ae. 76), 1691 ; Nicholas Johnson, 
1710 (also two very old undated stones of Nicholas and of 
Isaac). To the southward most of the comparatively few stones 
are not old ; an old undated one is of George Fowle ; another, 
Rebekah Storer, 1710. S. W. are Mary Brovne (jb. 22), 1678 ; 
two large slabs of very fine red sandstone are of Dr. John Chick- 
ering, 1676, and Mehetabel Broivne, 1676 ; " I. H., 1669," is of 
green stone ; of Brigden, are Michael (jb. 2), 1695, do. (ae. 45), 
1709, and Timothy, 1700 ; of Ballatt, lohn, 1702, and Lt. Sam- 
uel, 1708 ; Joanna Crisp (je. 79), 1698; of Fosdick, Anna, wife 
of John, 1679, and Mary, daughter of James, 1704-5 ; of Ket- 
tell, Sarah, 1692, Abigail, wife of Jonathan, 1690, Richard, 

1690, Joseph, son of Dea. Jos., 1704-5 ; of Damman, John, 

1691, Susanna, 1695 ; of Mousel, Elizabeth, 1685, John (Mousell), 
1703. The 59 stones to over 70 members of the once, and for 
over two centuries, numerous families of Frothingham are ar- 
ranged northwestward, towards the original (1630) grant to 
William (p. 151), the earliest with dates being Anna (se. 67, 
wife of Wm., and an original settler, 1630), 1674, Sarah, 1683, 
Nathaniel, 1688, Peter (ge. 53), 1688; and Mary his widow, 
1703 ; without dates, yet evidently very old, there are several. 
This name is here far more fully represented than any other. 



78 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

Of altar-shaped tombs, with sides of brick or of broken stone, 
and red sandstone (or other) tops of one large slab, there are 
18. A few have lost the base and the slab is on the ground, 
and the inscriptions on some are illegible (marked below, 27.). 
Farthest east is the tomb of Col. Michael Gill, 1720 (about a 
foot high, slab 6| x 31 ft.) ; next, John Lonrj, 1684 (1 ft. high, 
slab granite, 5| x 2| ft.) ; one il., 2 ft. high, pale slab, 6 ft. 
5 in. X 31 feet; another il., 1| ft. high, gray slab split, and 
corners broken, 5| x 2 ft. 11 in. Southerly is a row of five 
tombs, one il., slab on the ground ; then Abigail, wife of James 
Russell, 1709, 5| x 2| ft. ; James Russell, 1709 ; gray slab, 
Mavd Russell, 1642 (the earliest date on the ground') ; and 
Richard Russell, 1676, renewed by the family in 1787 (all these 
four are about 1|- ft. high) ; and beyond, a gray slab, il., on the 
ground. Near the top of the knoll are Judge John Phillips, 
1725, Katharine, 1698, and Henry, son of John, 1729 (?), in 
one tomb with a gray slab, 7^ x 3|- ft. ; one, il., is on the ground. 
Near the foot of the slope, S. E., is William Stitson, date il. ; 
near the top of the knoll, S. E. one about 2 ft. high, gray slab, 
il., now No. 70. South of the Harvard obelisk, and near it, is 
the best finished of all these tombs, 2| ft. high, witii sides, as 
well as top (Q\ X 3 ft.), of red sandstone, the tomb of the ^^3fin- 
isters of the first church " (as stated on a white marble slab at 
the end, placed there at the cost of the writer), Avhere several 
who died during or before the Revolution were buried. S. W. 
is one of David Newell, with new brick sides ; another il. ; and 
N. W. a third, also illegible. 

At the foot of the slope, N. W., are nine brick tombs with pur- 
ple slate slabs, in the round heads of which are family arjiis cut 
in a style far superior to any other elaborated carving in the 
Ground. From E. to TV. they are of Hon. Jonat. Dows, 1725 ; 
Ezekiel Cheever, 1744 ; Hon. Charles Chambers, 1743 [beside 
it a slab of fine red slate, no arms, to Rev. T. Prentiss, 1817] ; 
Jenncr, 1725; Foster, Sarah, 1724, Hon. Richard, 1774, etc. ; 
Jonathan Lemmon, 1724 [here, a white marble slab, no arms, 
to Hon. James Russell, 1798, Katharine, 1778, and their chil- 
dren] ; Thomas Greaves, 1747; David Wood, 1762 [Wyer, 
Solcy, Sam. Henley, three tombs without arms] ; and Samuel 



MONUlSrENTS. 79 

Gary, 1740-1. There are 9 tombs with hewn granite fronts all 
(except two small, eastward) on the N. W. slope, and lettered 
Joseph Hunnewell, Thomas Hunnewell, Joseph Smith, Charles 
Perry (two, where Union soldiers are buried), James Hunne- 
well (with an obelisk of polished red Scotch granite), and 
Walker. The small number of other monuments (very few of 
which are enclosed) are modern. A great many stones bear 
dates through tlie last century ; these, like all inscriptions here, 
have been carefully copied by E. N. and A. Coburn. It should 
also be added that the Ground is now in the care of the mu- 
nicipal authorities of Boston. 

Bunker Hill Monwnent is of national interest, not only 
as a memorial of the great opening battle — and one of the 
most important actions — of the Revolution, but also as one 
of the earliest, and, for a long while, the largest, works of its 
kind in the country. Its history, although, several times told, 
can well be condensed here from a dozen or more publications. 
Win. Tudor is said to have first advocated purchase of the 
battle-ground and tlie erection on it of a grand monument. He 
and four other gentlemen acted together (1823), the Russell 
pasture (2| acres) was bought, costing 81,250, and (June 27) 24 
gentlemen were incorporated as the B. H. M. Association, and 
25 more were elected members. To solicit funds, a prospectus 
was, in July, distributed through the country, followed (Sep. 
20, 1824) by an 8^^ " circular " from the Directors, and (Oct. 1) 
by an earnest printed appeal, sent to the Selectmen in Massa- 
chusetts. In 1825, an Act of the Legislature to aid (in ham- 
mering stone at the Prison, and in taking land) was passed 
(Feb. 26) ; more land was secured (in all, 15 acres, costing 
$23,232.43), and a subscription was headed in Boston by Hon. 
Wm. Phillips with |1,000, and David Sears and Peter C. 
Brooks $500 each. By Sep. 1 the amount raised was $54,- 
433.67, and meanwhile, June 17th, the corner-stone was laid 
with a great deal of ceremony (that by the report, 1830, cost 
$4,720.85). Plans had been considered, and (Oct. 1) Solo- 
mon Willard, a " self-educated man," was unanimously elected 
architect, and his design of the existing obelisk was adopted. 
In Feb., 1829, fourteen courses (37^ ft. high) stood above 



80 A CENTIJEY OF TOWN LIFE. 

ground, and hoisting works together with a large quantity of 
cut stone were on the spot ; but the funds were exhausted, 
and operations were suspended. Work was only resumed 
June 17, 1834, and continued until Nov., 1835, when a height 
of 85 feet was reached. 

Furtlier attempts were made to obtain money. A lottery, 
then a recognized and common mode, was petitioned for (Dec, 
1829), but abandoned; an appeal for direct aid from the State 
was unsuccessful ; an Address to its citizens (8°, pp. 8) was 
issued (1831), and a Report (S% pp. 15, 1832). Controversy 
ensued, then the financial crisis (1836-40), and the Associa- 
tion became embarrassed, so that a large amount of the land 
was sold at auction (Wed., Sep. 25, 1839).^ At length the 
ladies did what the men could not, or did not do ; they held a 
Fair (Sep. 8-15, 1840) in Quincy Hall, Boston, that netted the 
then unexampled and splendid sum of $=30,035.53. Amos 
Lawrence of Boston, and Judah Truro of New Orleans, each 
added $10,000. Work was again resumed (Nov., 1840), and 
on Saturday, July 23, 1842, at 6 a.m., the top stone was raised. 
Jas. S. Savage was the contractor^ and Solomon Willard saw the 
completion of his own design. June 17, 1843, there was a 
great celebration of the event, attended by many prominent 
men, including John Tyler, President of the United States. 
For years (1835-40) the unfinished obelisk had stood sur- 
rounded by a maze of granite blocks and a wild area of 
grass-ground, and later by rough banks and newly graded 
lots. Until 1843, a sloping road, with fiat stone tracks for 
wheels, led from the S. E. corner to the monument. Soon 
afterwards, all this was changed, and the present Square was 
substantially completed. In 1857, a white marble statue of 
Gen. Wai-ren, by Henry Dexter, was placed in a wooden lodge 
northward, and in 1871 Monument Avenue was opened from 
Main Street, giving a better approach, and a much better view 

1 As the Square then laid out was unsurpassed by any other in or close to, 
Boston, it is of interest to note the prices obtained for lots. Jacob Foss (of C. ) 
gave the highest price, 41 cts. per foot, at the corner of Hif^h and Concord Streets, 
while the lowest was 10 cts., paid by W. Appleton, for laud between Monument 
and Concord Streets. 



MONUMENTS. 81 

of the obelisk. Up to 1878 the total cost, includmg land, was 
$133,649.83. Towards this cost Charlestown contributed lib- 
erally. By the Report in 1830, we can count 518 subscribers 
there, giving |4,029. From Nathan Tufts came the only 
legacy ever received, $1,000. Proceeds from the town's table 
at the Fair (1840) were second in amount received at any, or 
$1,546.37. Subscribers to the Warren statue gave $1,250 (out 
of $5,125 raised). These items make a total of $7,825.37. 
While a part of the money obtained at the Fair did not come 
from the town, other amounts have, so that it is within bounds 
to say that six per cent — nearly one sixteenth — of the cost 
of this national work was given by the townspeople. To be 
sure, about $14,000 was paid sundry of them for land, but at 
the sale (1839) others largely offset it by their purchases. 

President G. W. Warren's copious History (1877) and Re- 
ports of the Association supply many of the particulars already 
given. For those about the great obelisk, reference is made to 
President Frothingham's "Siege" (1849), where (p. 356) the 
height is given at 221 feet, the diameter 30 feet at the base and 
half as much at the top. Below the surface of the ground is a 
foundation 12 feet deep, composed of heavy stones (12 x 2| X 2 
feet), and upward through the centre of the interior is a cylin- 
der 10 feet across at the bottom and 6| at the top. In the 
middle of it is a well, and around it a stairway with 294 steps 
leading to a room 11 feet across and 17 feet high, with an 
arched top, lighted by four small windows. Cut granite is 
used for all parts above ground, and for those below, the same 
material uncut. It may be added that the ground adjacent has 
been graded regularly, and shows little or none of the original 
surface, but nearly the original elevation. An area of about 
four acres making the Square, 400 feet on each side, is en- 
closed by an iron fence, without and within which is a line of 
trees growing slowly yet now of considerable size. From the 
surrounding streets four granite stairs lead up a bank on all 
sides of the area, and paths extend thence to the monument. 
Criticised as the work may be, it is a grand one, eminent on 
its historic site, noble among the historical memorials built in 
modern times. 



82 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

Two other monuments are closely connected with it. Inside 
is a white marble model of the first monument here, erected in 
1794 by King Solomon's Lodge of Charlestown. It was a 
square wooden Tuscan pillar on a brick base, in all about 30 
feet high, that was at last rather mysteriously damaged or 
destroyed in 1825. In front of the obelisk stands one of the 
very best and most appropriate statues, at least, in the State, 
a bronze figure (1881) of Col. Wm. Prescott, his long, loose 
" banyan coat " thrown open by the wind, his sword in hand, 
his broad-brimmed hat on his head, his attitude just what it 
was when he looked at the coming charge. The work is at 
once an honor to those who gave it, to William W. Story the 
sculptor, and to the hero of the redoubt in the battle of Bunker 
Hill. (See Frontispiece.) 

After the war for preserving the Union, the struggle to 
found which fully began on Bunker Hill, other events and 
heroes were to be commemorated, and Charlestown, like a 
great number of places, raised a Soldiers' Blonument to those 
who had gone from it, and had fallen in the national defence. 
Some thought that a memorial of volunteers in this service 
should be paid for by voluntary contributions, but other opin- 
ions prevailed, and the cost was defrayed by taxation. A 
square base bearing three large figures, all designed by Martin 
Mil more and made of Hallo well granite, stands in the old 
Trainingfield, now very neatly and prettily laid out. The 
work was dedicated June 17, 1872. As a class, the numerous 
memorials of this kind are far greater evidences of affection- 
ate regard for the soldiers and sailors than of genius in art. 
Whatever may be thought of this particular work, it is very 
much superior to not a few well-meant and expensive objects 
to be seen in the country, and that make us glad that the de- 
fenders of the flag have a great deal more honor than is done 
them in some of the designs. 

NATIONAL AND STATE INSTITUTIONS. 

Appropriately, close by the first great battle-ground of Inde- 
pendence, the new national government established one of its 



NATIONAL AND STATE INSTITUTIONS. 83 

most important stations for the defence of what was secured 
by the Revolution. A site had been proposed at Noddle's 
Island, but a committee on the part of the town represented 
(1800), that this would be " almost as injurious to it as a second 
conflagration." While still embarrassed by their " unequalled 
Sufferings " in the late war, the townspeople, as they then 
stated, were, after years of " industrious application " enabled 
"to sustain a decent rank with [their] fellow citizens at 
large," and they urged that a site they proposed should be 
chosen. On June 17, 1800, the Legislature authorized the 
United States to purchase land in Charlestown for the Navy 
Yard, and " between 40 and 50 acres," " valued by a Jury at 
$37,280," were bought, or at about half the price asked by the 
owners. This area was very well situated beside some of the 
deepest water and in one of the most secure parts of the har- 
bor, and also included the landing-place of the British troops 
on June 17, 1775. Both land and sea-front were by degrees 
well laid out, and what is thought to be one of the best pieces 
of property of its kind owned by the nation has been the result. 
The chief structure on it is a dry dock of hewn granite 
(341 X 80 feet, and 30 deep), planned by Loammi Baldwin, 
and built (1827-34) at a cost of $670,089. A ropewalk 
(1836), said to be the best in the country, also of granite 
(1360 ft. long), is of one story, except at the northerly end, 
where a second (748 ft.) was added (1856), and where there 
is a head-house (60 x 70 ft.) of three stories. One of the ear- 
liest buildings (1803) is of brick, near the entrance to the 
Yard, and of the same material is the large house of the Com- 
mandant (1809). Trees and grass-grounds well arranged 
make the place really beautiful in summer. Purchases of 
land and covering of fiats have increased the area to 87-| 
acres, while liberal expenditure of money, with rise in the 
value of real estate, make the establishment represent a very 
large sum. A much larger one would not now, however, se- 
cure another as well placed and fitted. There are shiphouses 
(3), high and substantial timber-sheds (4), granite store- 
houses (4), wet docks, the dry dock, and over twenty other 
well-built structures for various purposes. For the names of 



84 A CENTUKY OF TOWN LIFE. 

the many distinguished commandants (about 25), and of the 
famous vessels built here (21 before 1860, and 40 since), be- 
sides a great number refitted, reference should be made to the 
account written by the late Admiral Geo. H. Preble (Mem. 
Hist. Boston, iii.), — an account so good that it makes us re- 
gret that a full history prepared by him has not been printed. 

In 1800 (Jan. 22) the Legislature appointed a committee to 
select and procure land in Charlestown for a State Prison. 
About five acres, including flats, were bought beside a bay in 
the northerly bank of Charles Eiver, and during 1804-5, a 
building (200 x 28 to 44 ft.) of hewn stone, four and five sto- 
ries high, and another of brick (227 X 25 ft.) for workshops, 
were erected. There was also a workyard (375 x 200 ft.), 
and the establishment was surrounded by a higli strong wall. 
On the whole work $170,000 were spent. At the time writers 
stated that the institution commanded a " rich and variegated 
prospect," and a belief was cherished that it would help to 
"promote the happiness of the town." Convicts were first re- 
ceived Dec. 12, 1805 (during that month 34), and afterwards 
in gradually increasing numbers, so that by Aug., 1816, there 
were 280, guarded by 15 officers. An insurrection was once 
attempted, when several prisoners scaled the walls, but all of 
them except one were retaken. Subsequently a man has now 
and then escaped, but outbreaks of any sort have been uncom- 
mon, and, indeed, the management has been such that it has 
not caused any large amount of controversial printing. Work 
of various sorts has been given to persons who were, or could 
be, fitted for it; firm, even discipline has been maintained, and 
one in the neighborhood, not knowing of the Prison, would 
hardly be aware that it existed, it is so quiet and well ordered. 
Additions to the buildings were from time to time made as 
needed before 1850, when an octagonal central structure (73 x 
68 ft. inside, and T0|- ft. high), and a new wing (90 x 48 x 
41 ft.), all of granite, were erected. In 1874 the construction 
of a new prison at Concord Avas authorized, and this at Charles- 
town was not used for several years ; but after a costly experi- 
ment had been tried, it was reoccupied, and continues to prove 
well adapted to its appointed purposes. During the passing 



NATIONAL AND STATE INSTITUTIONS. 85 

years it has become environed by railroads and buildings, losing 
its original retirement, and even a certain picturesqueness, yet 
not its convenience and security. Even the costumes of those 
connected with it have been hardly less changed ; the officers 
are better dressed or uniformed, and a red and blue longitudi- 
nal half-and-half garb for those they watched has been discarded 
fo'r less conspicuous attire. Of course while the population of 
the State has been increasing rapidly, so also has the number 
of inmates, now varying from 550 to 600. Reports that have 
been printed since 1841, a history, descriptions in four publica- 
tions with six large plates, and many pamphlets (see Bibliog- 
raphy), supply an unusual amount of information about the 
rise, growth, and management of this institution. 

Near the westerly bank of the bay from Charles River, and 
opposite the Burial-Ground and Prison, the McLean AsT/lum 
for the Insane was built on a knoll that was Charlestown 
ground until 1842, when it became a part of Somerville. It is 
a site of historic interest, known as Miller's, or Cobble, Hill in 
1775, when (Nov.) it was fortified and made one of the strong- 
est points in the line of works built by the Provincial forces 
during the siege of Boston, commanding the ferry across the 
river and threatening the British redoubts in Charlestown. 
Here also, in 1777, were quartered some of the troops captured 
at Saratoga. After the war the land was bought by Joseph 
Barrell, a merchant of Boston, who erected (1792) a large 
house and laid out extensive grounds to which the name of 
Poplar Grove was given, and that were for years a show place. 
In the settlement of liis affairs, the estate was bought for the 
important institution that bears the name of another merchant, 
the honored John McLean, and that was opened Oct. 6, 1818. 
Three large buildings, two of them with domes, the house of 
Mr. Barrell, and newer structures that have risen as wanted, 
all surrounded by gardens, grassgrounds, and trees, are still 
conspicuous monuments of the beneficence of the founder. 
Extensive usefulness, superior accommodations, and high repu- 
tation, have distinguished the Asylum. 



86 A CENTUKY OF TOWN LIFE. 



OLD HOUSES. 



The oldest building in Charlestown that the writer has vis- 
ited, and, indeed, has known of as existing in his time, was the 
house bouglit by Charles Hunnewell in 1710, and occupied by 
four generations of his descendants.^ It was probably built 
about 1690, and was destroyed perhaps five and twenty years 
ago, certainly through no fault of the late James Hunnewell, 
who made all due effort for its preservation. Built of wood, 
two stories high, with narrow windows, a huge chimney in the 
middle, and low rooms having plastered ceilings crossed by 
stout, painted beams, it had a snugness and quaintness in- 
creased by really picturesque surroundings ; for it stood back 
from the road on a couple of little terraces flanked on one side 
by a garden W' ith a row of very large lilac shrubs, and on the 
other by a few good-sized elms. In earlier times there was a 
pleasant outlook from the front towards Cambridge meeting- 
house, less than a mile distant, while behind the ground gently 
rose to a considerable height fronl which there was a wide 
prospect. At present it would be hard enough to find a house 
that has stood not merely through the American Revolution, 
but that dates almost from the English of 1688, and is as pretty 
a relic of early Provincial domestic life. Indeed, this old 
liomestead would not liave been out of keeping amid the rural 
beauty of old England itself. 

^ The only printed historical account of the occupants (a brief one is in the 
"Journal of the Voyage of the Missionary Packet, Boston to Honolulu, 1826, by 
James Hunnewell," 4°, 1880 (the writer's privately printed work, no. viii. ), in 
which also is a Memoir of the Author of the Journal, who was born in this house. 
Charles Hunnewell, mentioned above, as evidence still shows, was esteemed as a 
good neighbor, and was in what are called comfortable circumstances, in which, it 
appears, he was exceeded by but few of his fellow townsmen in his time. He and 
his descendants were quiet, law-abiding people, apt to mind their own business, go 
to meeting on Sunday, and not be over anxious for public office. In several docu- 
ments all are called "yeomen," as at first is William (fourth generation, and father 
of James), but who subsequently, in several cases, is styled "gentleman." The 
oldest of their books, that the writer has, is a Bible bought by William (grandson 
of Charles), who paid £6. 10s. for it. As his writing is not quite so bad as that 
of some of the ministers, and his spelling not worse than that of the schoolmaster, 
he probably had a fair average education, and he evidently liked a good book. 



OLD HOUSES. 87 

Of houses burned in 1775 there are, as ah-eady stated, few- 
exact or full descriptions. From the best (pp. 118, 124, 138) 
we can think that there were some of good size and finish ; but 
as has also been stated (p. 11), while not a few probably were 
quaint, vague statements at that date are to be credited with 
reserve. 

Several erected at or near the rebuilding are mentioned in 
this chapter, or in the Survey (pp. 116, 119, 124, 132, 135, 139, 
143, 144). One of the most prominent of these, from its posi- 
tion and the office of its occupant, was the Parsonage (Plan IL), 
of wood (52| X 403^2)5 ^^^ *^^o stories high. Around it was 
a garden, and on the slight hill slope southward the Parish 
Chapel (p. 53). There was also a barn (32| x 19|), besides 
a shed (42| long). All the ground was occupied (1835) by 
Harvard Row (p. 97), and the house was moved to Elm Street, 
where it stood until 1886. 

When the town was rebuilt, and later, for a period of per- 
haps forty years, the prevailing English style of building was 
used, so far as means and the limits of practically available 
materials allowed. It was what might be called the Georgian 
style in its simpler forms, in which classic mouldings and cor- 
nices, and even pillars, were to considerable extent copied with 
more or less accuracy. So little real architectural character 
was, however, possible, that a classification of the houses must 
be by forms or plans rather than by styles. 

Two forms were almost exclusively used. By far the more 
common one of them was an oblong of two or three stories 
with an end at the sidewalk of the street, a front entry at the 
middle of the side with a stair, and a room on each hand ; 
while attached at the inner end was a wing generally two sto- 
ries high. Along the entrance front was an area of more or 
less width, lengthwise of which was a path usually paved, be- 
side which, sometimes, was a bed of flowers lined by borders 
of box plants. In the area also usually stood two elms, horse- 
chestnuts, or trees of some sort. The other form was a square 
of the same height, with four rooms on a floor, and with a 
similar wing, the front door being usually on the street; or 
there was one there and another at the side, and the building 



88 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

was made for two families. Houses with both of these plans 
were made of brick as well as of wood. 

Of the oblong form in wood, the three finest houses in the 
lower part of the town were those of Mrs. Baker (pp. 129-30), 
I. Warren (p. 131), and J. Hurd (Plan III. 84). The latter 
house, built about 1795, and now (1887) occupied by his grand- 
children, is in excellent order. It is painted light brown, is 
clapboarded, has well moulded window-frames, and a cornice 
with modillions. It fronts towards a lawn, on which is one of 
the noblest horsechestnut trees ever in the town, and is entered 
beneath an Ionic porch, a fine example of the sort attached to 
some of the older houses. The refinement of the lines and 
work here, as well as in the window-casings, is in pleasant 
contrast with some irregular recent designs. Similar in nearly 
all respects were the first two houses mentioned, that were de- 
molished several years ago. Other notable oblong wooden 
houses were those of Dr. J. Bartlett (III. 81), Hon. Benj. 
Thompson (III. 76), Dr. A. R. Thompson (IV. 126), S. John- 
son (p. 148), and Maj. Walker, all on Main Street, and all 
now much altered. Another, that of Mr. Webb, since Mrs. E. 
F. Adams's, on Cordis Street, had the largest grounds (now 
reduced), and might be called the pleasantest. 

Of brick houses in oblong form there were few. That of 
M. Bridge (p. 129), later occupied by Edward Everett and 
others, had a wing at the back. Dr. Walker's (p. 137), with- 
out a wing, Geo. Bartlett's, Union Street, and E. Breed's were 
three stories high (the upper one of them low), and faced the 
street. All of them are now (1887) standing. With an end 
towards the street arc those of Dea. A. Tufts (III. 79), and of 
Jas. Hunnewell (p. 93). Of square brick houses were those 
of R. Devens, near the Navy Yard ; one at the head of Salem 
Street, occupied by Mrs. Harrison in 1812 ; the Makepeace 
house, built on Main St., near the burial-ground, in 1797, three 
stories high, ornamented with terra cotta bands, caps, and 
cornice, and the most elaborate of the earlier brick houses ; 
and the house built on Charles River Avenue (I. 25) by Hon. 
Thos. Russell, and not finished at his death (1796). This 
latter had a front of 52 ft., facing the present Water Street, 



OLD HOUSES. 89 

and was about as deep. On each side towards the back was a 
wing, making tlie wall of the rear 70 ft. 10 in. long (shown by 
a plan with a deed). The brick walls were varied by trim- 
mings of dark stone ;^ towards Water St. there was a porch ;2 
towards the Square a yard with an open slat fence ; ^ and on 
the top was a " large cupola that cost as much as a house." ^ 
For many years, and until it was burned in the great fire, 
Aug. 28, 1835, it was a public house, known as Gordon's, 
Nichols's, or the Charlestown Hotel (until 1805*), Pierce's,^ 
or, in 1817, the Brick Hotel,^ and finally as the Middlesex 
House'^'^, kept by Jas. Walker.^ 

Of the square wooden houses built for one family, the hand- 
somest that ever stood in the town was builf by Hon. James 
Russell in 1780^ (1790 ?). It was at the corner of the Square 
and Warren Avenue (opened 1828), and was the family mansion 
not only until his death (1796), but until his daughter died 
(1819). During the next seventeen years it was occupied by 
Com. John Shaw, John Soley (G. M., Grand Lodge of Mass.), 
Andrew Dunlap (U. S. Dist. Attorney^), and Joseph Thomp- 
son. In 1835 it became a public house,^ known as the Mansion 
House, successively kept by Gorham Bigelow and Jas. Ram- 
say,^ all the while growing shabby, and still more deprived of 
its early glory by a row of very dirty houses, popularly called 
"Dublin Row," that stood on its former garden beside the Ave- 
nue, until all, along with the mansion, were demolished (1866) 
and replaced by the southerly part of the Waverley House. In 
the good old English way the Russells held the ground of their 
ancestral home until the death of the last resident who bore 
the name ; and although the situation was unfortunate, directly 
on the market-place of a growing town, the fine mansion was 
built there as soon as could be after the fire of 1775, and per- 
haps thus got a popular name, said to have been given it, of 
"Russell's Folly." 

It^ was three stories high, the upper one of them low, as 

1 Says Mr. H. K. Frothingham. 2 h. H. Edes (Harv. Ch., 125). ^ Hon. G. 
W. Warren. * Eecords King Sol. Lodge. ^ j)_ Balfour. ^ The description of 
the exterior of the Jas. Eussell house is from the writer's observation ; that of the 
interior and gai'dens before alterations, from an old friend who lived there, and was 
very prominent in the society of the town. 



90 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

usual, and the front was covered with smooth boarding, pierced 
by fourteen handsomely framed windows, and a door in the 
centre covered by a porch. At each corner there was a Co- 
rinthian pilaster reaching to the cornice, and on top was a 
cupola. All the mouldings, capitals, and details were of classic 
character. Before the house was a good-sized yard, bounded 
by walls at the sides, and a high open fence in front, and 
crossed at the middle by a paved walk. In the rear, extending 
to the river, was a garden with three paths running in that 
direction, while a paved driveway, entered from a narrow street 
westward, passed between it and the house. In the house there 
were four rooms on a floor and a hall through the middle. 
Details of these two Russell houses are here made rather full 
as some accounts in print have mixed them and do not appear 
to be correct. 

Of the notable square wooden houses for one family were 
those of M. Bridge (p. 116), S. Swan (p. 132), Capt. Cordis 
(p. 143), John Hurd (p. 134), all now standing, and Richard 
Frothingham, that was at the corner of Main and Eden Streets. 
The last, very large, three stories high, well finished, having 
four entrances, and standing a little back from the sidewalks, 
was near the middle of the original grant of Wra. Frothingham 
(1630-38), and of what might be called the Frothingham dis- 
trict (p. 151), that extended nearly across the peninsula. 
Another square house of one of the family, Dea. Jas., still re- 
mains, at the corner of Washington and Union Streets ; it is 
two stories high, elevated on a terrace, and placed several feet 
back from the sidewalks. Originally it commanded a wide 
view of West Boston and Charles River. At the corner of 
Winthrop and Main streets (pp. 133-34) is a very early house. 

Several square wooden houses were built for two families, 
among which were those of D. Wood (p. 149), and another of 
early date belonging in the same family, subsequently made a 
tavern, and, to give room for the Harvard meeting-house, re- 
moved to the corner of Main and Miller streets. There was 
also one long occupied by Wm. Austin and Capt. Boyd on 
High and Wood streets, that was, some time ago, converted 
into a single house, a very good one, for many years the home 



4 

,1" hi"* ' 



^ 




OLD HOUSES. 91 

of the late F. B. Austin. An unusually large one stands on 
Washington Street ; and there is another on High Street (52 
X 36), originally connected by interior doors, later occupied 
(north side) by P. Willard, and then modernized. All these 
houses had three stories (the upper one of them low), and 
are standing (1887), although more or less altered. 

At the end of the last century, and in the earlier part of the 
present, mansion houses for single families were built on the 
slopes of Breed's Hill. There were eight that were notable, 
two of brick, and oblong, six of wood, and square, five of them 
being of two, and one of three stories. All but two of the 
latter are now (1887) standing. AH had grounds of good, some 
of large, extent, one of the estates only now remaining of the 
original size, the others being more or less reduced, and three 
nearly covered by recent buildings. Besides these eight was the 
Commandant's house at the Navy Yard, built in 1809, two sto- 
ries high, of brick, square, with two bold swells towards a garden 
and the Yard and harbor. It has been continuously occupied 
by the first officer at this station, and has also been the scene 
of many large receptions. 

Nearly opposite to it is the square wooden mansion (50 x 
50 ft.) built by Nathan Tufts, placed far back from the street 
at the top of terraces covered by grass shaded by a few trees, 
and commanding a fine view towards the water. The grounds, 
although reduced in area, are still large. After the death of 
Mrs. Tufts (1848), who survived her husband eight years, the 
house was used for a boarding-school, and was called " Rydal 
Mount." Subsequently it was occupied for over a quarter of a 
century by the Rev. Thos. R. Lambert, D.D., rector of St. John's. 
Painted brown on the outside, it is now in fine order. Through 
the centre of the interior there is a large and handsome hall, 
at the inner end of which in the middle rises a staircase turn- 
ing at the top to the right and left, and on each side are rooms 
of good height and size. All these parts are handsomely fin- 
ished in the style already described (p. 87), and that was used, 
more or less elaborated, in all the eight mansions. The plate 
shows, from right to left, the Tufts, Commandant's, Devens 
(p. 88), Breed (dark), and Kettell (white, p. 92) houses, and 
Bunker Hill behind the last. 



92 A CENTUKY OF TOWN LIFE. 

At a little distance, but fronting more towards the south, 
was a very long and comparatively narrow estate where Mt. 
Vernon Street and the houses on it now are, owned by E, Breed 
and divided and built upon in 1846. His house, of brick, ob- 
long (71 ft. long), three stories high, with an end on the present 
street, is the only original feature remaining ; but this has been 
enlarged and altered. For many years it was occupied by Com. 
John Downes ; for several since it has been owned and occupied 
by Chas. Smith. Originally there was a large lawn in front of 
the house, while beside it was a greenhouse, and in the rear a 
garden and orchard. 

Beside Mr. Breed's estate was that of N. Adams, not as deep, 
but wider, and of about as great size, having the largest lawn 
for a long while, or perhaps ever, on the peninsula, facing which, 
and the south, is the house (52|- x 51 ft), wooden, square, three 
stories high, changed from the Russell Academy, for which it 
was built. For over sixty years this has been the homestead 
of one of the best known families in the town, and has borne 
the name of an esteemed citizen who long occupied it, Geo. A. 
Kettell. A former orchard and garden at the rear are now 
covered by recent brick houses. Internally, the plan is similar 
to that of the Tufts mansion. 

Thence westward for some distance there was no large place 
until that of Capt. Benj. Swift was reached, nearly opposite the 
head of Cordis Street. He bought the land (1809) of J. Noble, 
who had it (1803) of Dea. J. Larkin. It was a large lot 
bounded by High, Laurel, and Cross streets, now closely cov- 
ered by brick houses. Here he built a square two-storied 
wooden mansion with a steep roof, and a gable in front, unlike 
any of the other older square houses ; as also unlike was a low 
piazza towards High Street, above which the edifice was con- 
spicuously placed on the top of terraces ending in a wall that 
rose a few feet from the sidewalk. In its latter years, at least, 
the house was divided and arranged for two families, Mrs. H. 
Forster and D. Snow being for some time occupants. 

On the other side of High Street, and extending down Green's 
lane (now street) to Main Street, was an acre of land that for 
years belonged to J. Hay (p. 145), and that, like the other land 



OLD HOUSES. 93 

along the slope of the hill, as well as on its top, was pasture, 
much of it until fifteen to thirty-five years after the Revolution. 
In 1791 Sam. Dexter bought the tract just described, and soon 
built a square wooden mansion (50 x 45 ft.), two stories high, 
with a low roof, and a cupola in the middle. Around this were 
laid out grounds that in combination of extent and elaboration 
have never been surpassed on the peninsula. There was a car- 
riage-house at the corner of High Street, along which, farther 
on, was a high brick wall forming the back of a greenhouse. 
In front of the mansion was a broad walk paved with chequered 
marble tiles ; around the garden were paths covered with dark 
Medford gravel and bordered with box, as well as fruit trees ; 
while beside Green Street was a noble row of horsechestnuts. 
In plan and interior finish the house resembled that of the 
Tuftses and of the Kettells, but there was no side entrance, wing, 
or front porch, with which both of those houses were provided. 
Mr. Dexter did not live here a great while, but sold (1800) to 
G. Alexander, and he (1814) to M. Bridge, who died in a few 
months, but whose widow occupied the place until it was bought 
(Dec. 27, 1831) by H. Davidson. He, his daughter Mrs. Lock- 
wood, and his grandson, successively held the house, the latter 
leaving it in 1883, and the A. Lincoln Post of the Grand Army 
buying it (1887). The amount of land has, however, been 
much reduced, Mr. Davidson selling lots for Dexter Row (1836, 
p. 145) for the Winthrop meeting-house (1847, p. 58), and to 
T. T. Sawyer and E. Lawrence on High Street (1850). At no 
time was the house itself in finer order than when it was left 
by the Lockwoods, and at no time was it a pleasanter place than 
during their occupation. By the writer many an agreeable 
hour is associated with the old garden and with the rooms of 
the mansion. By the Post the roof has been raised, and a wing 
has been added (1887), but the exterior otherwise, and the 
lower story have been only moderately altered. 

On the other side of Green Street is the place where the 
writer was born, where he has always lived, and where this 
book is written, bought by his father, the late James Hunnewell, 
May 17, 1831, soon after coming home for the last time from 
the Hawaiian Islands. Throug-h most of two centuries the land 



94 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

here has been held by those who had business on the high seas. 
On June 17, 1775, a barn that seems to have stood near the 
lower end of the land escaped the great fire and was used as a 
shelter for American marksmen during the final attack by the 
British, when the former were dislodged and it was burned 
(p. 11). For over forty years the land then remained vacant, 
at first owned by D. Wood, who sold (1801) to 0. Holden. In 
1817 it was bought by Joseph Thompson, for whom the house 
here was built, but by whom it was owned only a short time. 
Amos Binney, Naval Agent, one of the wealthiest men of Bos- 
ton in his day, held the estate awhile, and sold it, as stated, in 
1831.1 While he owned it, it is said to have been occupied by 
Com. Perry, U. S. N., afterwards the widely-known commander 
of the Japan Expedition (1852-54). From the first the place 
was laid out as elaborately as any in the town. On three sides 
were rows of horsechestnut trees that for several months in the 
year formed a dense hedge, hiding from many of the windows 
of the house all other buildings, except the steeple of the Har- 
vard Church. Along Green Street the branches of the row 
there met those of a similar row on the Davidson estate, and 
made, for a hundred feet, a sort of large arbor above the road- 
way, to which few rays of the sun penetrated through the dense 
foliage. At other seasons there was for many years, from the 
middle of the house, a view down Main. Street as far as Dr. 
Thompson's (p. 147), and from one window a much wider pros- 

* Note. — An instance may be given here of stability in a neighborhood, 
perhaps not now surpassed within an equal distance from State Street. At 
the corner of Wood and High streets since about 1817 have been the Aus- 
tin's (Wm., F. B., and his family) ; next on Wood St., for nearly 60 years, 
was J. Wilson; opposite, on Wood and Green, since 1831, J. and J. F. 
Hunnewell; on Green and High, H. Davidson, his daughter, and grandson, 
1831-8:]; on High, T. T. Sawyer, 1854-86, and E. Lawrence or his son 
since 1854; on Cordis (adjoining), Mrs. E. F. Adams, 1858-86, on an es- 
tate in a previous period owned by her father. Adjoining some of these 
estates are four meeting-houses, Universalist since 1810, Harvard since 
1818, Winthrop since 1818, and Trinity since 1867. It may be added that 
on the repeated repairs and alterations made in the writer's home the same 
men have been engaged, in not a few instances, through periods of thirty 
to forty years, and that for fifty-seven years the house has not been closed. 



OLD HOUSES. 95 



pect, for there, the writer remembers that he, when a boy, used, 
with a spy-glass, to watch the carriages on Winter Hill. From 
the top of the house could be seen all Boston and a large piece 
of the harbor, as well as the country to the hills of Waltham 
and Brighton and Blue Hill in Milton. All this view, except 
of northern and central Boston, is still obtained. Other recol- 
lections of boyhood, clear to the writer, are those of trains of 
many sleds, or " pungs " drawn by two or four horses that he 
used to see bound down Main Street on winter mornings, to find 
in Boston a market for country produce that they had brought 
from the distant interior, even, they said, as far off as Canada. 
Frozen deer, looking a good deal like life, were perhaps the 
chief wonders that were displayed. At this time, and later, the 
Square, it may be added, was really a market-place, often half 
filled with loads of hay, firewood, and other rural products of- 
fered for sale. The old four-horse stage-coach for Lowell used 
also to go daily up (and down) the Main Street, and many a 
time the writer waited for it in that old shop at Craft's Corner, 
a quainter place than anything now, and as often he had a 
pleasant ride into the country. 

In writing of one's own house there is not a feeling of taking 
liberties that there is when dealing with the private affairs of 
others, so that in this case there may be a little more freedom 
used. Our house was one of the oblong kind (originally 74 x 
25 ft.), and was built of brick except a wing that was of wood, 
and was painted white. Several steps led up to the front door 
facing the garden, and over the door was a low-arched trellis 
covered with honeysuckles and roses. In the beds close by, 
lined with box, were as many old-fashioned flowers as had room 
to grow, tulips, peonies, iris, Persian lilacs, London pride, lark- 
spurs, pinks, and more ; and there were bits of hawthorn hedge, 
plenty of plums and grapes, and, in the sun by the steps, a fig- 
tree that would bear something after much coaxing. One of 
the writer's old favorites was a red-berried mountain ash, a nice 
tree once in fashion, and there was a huge snowball, that made 
almost another tree of itself, and that was perhaps the last 
relic of the old parsonage garden (destroyed 1835) from which 
it was transplanted. 



96 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

While the original brick walls remain, the house (entirely 
now of brick, 74 x 54 ft.) has probably been changed more than 
any other in town that has not been altered for business, or 
that has been constantly the residence of one family. It has 
been, indeed, although of course on a small scale, more like 
many of the old English family homes, plain but substantial, 
and without architectural character outside, but quaint or pic- 
turesque and very comfortable inside ; changed this way or that, 
as use or convenience suggested, until it is evidently a growth 
and not the result of a single contract. Bric-a-brac and curi- 
osities from many a country, besides books, and, still more, the 
charm of old associations, make the rooms pleasant, and the 
group they form thoroughly home. 

The most notable part is perhaps the private business-room 
of the Avriter, — large, oblong, rather old-worldish in aspect, with 
its red-beamed ceiling and two shafted windows filled with 
stained glass. Like a good deal of the house the growth of 
wants and circumstances, it is peculiarly his home-spot made 
by himself, for he was his own architect, and then librarian to 
form, book by book, a collection that gives the apartment com- 
pleteness. Many associations with those who have been in the 
house linger around, and the books have many besides with 
their authors and scores of former notable owners and dis- 
persed libraries. 

Outside, the garden, though changed, is still pleasant ; eight 
or ten of the trees, now grown very tall, are standing, while it 
seems as if all the old human Charlestown were slowly passing 
away. Still we and the good old home keep together, but the 
future tells us none of its secrets. 

Farther northward, between School Street and Salem Street, 
James Harrison bought (1799-1802) a large lot (114 ft. on 
Main St., 126 ft. on High St.) and built there a square wooden 
mansion, two stories high, resembling tlie Dexter house, but 
plainer, without a cupola, and surrounded by far less elaborate 
grounds. In front there was a lawn reaching to a slat fence 
along ]\[ain Street, and there were a few trees for shade. At 
the rear was a small orchard with a high, rough board fence, 
on High Street. Mr. Harrison died in 1812. Somewhat later 



OLD HOUSES. 97 

the house was occupied by Loammi Baldwin, engineer of sundry 
canals, and of the admirable granite dry-dock in the Navy Yard. 
In 1870 the land was divided into house-lots, most of which were 
built upon, but the front is still (1887) dismantled and open. 

At the head of Salem Street stands the wooden mansion (42 
X 40 ft.), two stories high, that was the residence of 0. Holden 
(married in C, 1791), an active and prominent man between 
1790 and 1840, preacher, composer of music, and extensive op- 
erator in real estate ; indeed, one of the most prominent men 
in the town immediately after the rebuilding. Afterwards the 
Huntingtons and Twomblys lived here. Originally the grounds 
connected with the house reached from close upon High Street 
to Bunker Hill Street, but they are now much restricted, having 
been built upon from time to time. Tlie house, however, for 
some years occupied by Thos. Doane, remains in as good order 
as ever. There was a wide view from it when few buildings 
stood in the neighborhood, as is shown by a print made as late 
as 1827. Although there were few or no large trees, there was 
a garden with fruit and flowers. 

After acquaintance, sometimes intimate, with most of the 
houses mentioned, and with their occupants, the writer has 
lived to see great changes. Already other houses once promi- 
nent are nearly forgotten, and one by one these still spared 
must pass away ; hence, it may be hoped that his descriptions 
of them may help to show what they were. 

Here might be added some account of houses showing the 
fashions or requirements of a closely succeeding generation. 
The most notable undertakings in buildings of the sort then 
were of Harvard Row, of Dexter Row (p. 145), and on Monu- 
ment Square. When the old Parsonage lands (Plan XL) were 
sold, the Parish Land Co. was formed, and on the tract was 
built (1835-36) a block of nine brick houses, tliree stories 
high, with granite basements, brown-stone doorway-frames, and 
pitched roofs slated. They were not detached, like the older 
houses built when land was in less demand, but they formed a 
block, the largest of the kind that had yet been raised in the 
town. The owners were James Hunnewell (treasurer of the 
Co. and promoter), Nos. 7* and 9 (he paying |605 for first 

7 



98 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

choice of the latter, which is nearest the First Church) ; Josiah 
Barker (8); Shadrach Varney* (6); Wm. Henry* (5); Eben' 
Barker (4) ; Josiah Reed (3) ; Oilman Stanley (2) ; and Lem- 
uel Stetson (1, nearest the Town Hall). J. Doane, Jr., E. Da- 
vidson, and O. Vinal before the finish replaced three.* The 
lots on Monument Square, although sold in 1839, were generally 
long unoccupied, a few on the westerly side being even now va- 
cant. On the east side, in order from High Street, brick houses 
of three stories, and of an excellent class, were built by Oeo. 
B. Neal (1850), still occupied by him; A. Brown (1853, occu- 
pied by Col. T. Upham, A. Hollingsworth, F. Jaques, and T. 
O. Frothingham now there) ; Wm. Carlton (1861-62) ; Jas. 
Lee (1856) ; P. Hubbell (1846-47) ; Oeo. W. Warren (do.) ; 
L. A. Huntington (1847-48); R. Frothingham (1856-57); all 
these built one house each ; and J. S. Small (1857-58) four 
houses. The dates are from Hubbell vs. Warren. On the 
north side, the first house (second from Lexington St.) was 
built by Dr. Wm. Ounton of Washington, D. C, for his daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Budington. The last two lots were not built upon 
until 1886. On High Street, in front of the Monument, is the 
most expensive, as well as the most elaborately furnished, brick 
house ever on the peninsula, — that of Capt. J. B. Thomas. 



LIBRARIES. 

After 1715 there was a shop in town, and the only one, for 
the sale of books and writing materials, kept by E. Phillips 
(Plan I., 8), who was also a book-binder. His son Eleazer, 
established at Charleston in 1730, was the first printer in the 
Carolinas. It has been already stated (p. 14) that among the 
great number of claims for losses (443) made by individuals 
in 1775, there is no evidence of anything like a library, although 
forty persons lost books in the burning of the town. In later 
years, however, a statement has been repeatedly made that the. 
Mather library was then destroyed,^ but the writer has been 

1 "Dr. Mather lost his library" (Frothingham, 1849, "Siege," 203); "the fur- 
niture, plate, and library of Dr. Mather were consumed in the fire" (Wheildon 



LIBRARIES. 99 

unable to find any definite contemporary authority for it, and 
cannot think that this very important collection was thus lost ; 
indeed, there seem to be reasons for a belief that it could not 
have been burned in Charlestown. 

After the Revolution the local business in stationery was 
done by Allen and Gushing, who were the first printers in the 
town (1785-87). In 1819, in connection with his sale of 
these articles, and of school-books, appeared a Catalogue of 
T. M. Baker's Circulating Library, at 24 Main Street. There 
must have been 2,500 volumes, consisting of History, Biog- 
raphy, Voyages, Travels, and Novels, Tales and Romances, 
as they were classified. In 1821, a large addition had been 
made, including a liberal sprinkling of sensational titles. At 
Washington Hall (Plan I., 86 ; Bib. of C, 46) there was for 
some years after Nov., 1813, a reading-room. Two reading 

(1875), Battle of B. H., 44) ; "a considerable portion, if not the whole, of Increase 
Mather's library is said to have been burned in the destruction of Charlestown iu 
1775" (Mem. Hist. Boston, I. xviii). Samuel, son of Rev. Dr. Samuel Mather, 
wrote (Drake's Int. to his ed. of I. Mather's "Philip's War," xxiii) that his "Fa- 
ther's Library was by far the most valuable Part of the family Property. It con- 
sisted of 7,000 or 8,000 Volumes of the most curious and chosen Authors, and a 
prodigious Number of valuable Manuscripts, which had been collected by my An- 
cestors for five Generations. These he considered worth at least eight thousand 
pounds sterling." 

It seems to have been by far the most precious private library in the region, or 
in New England, and its fate is a subject of great interest. 

A question at once occurs, — why was such a bulky and valuable library, so 
great a part of the family property, removed to Charlestown ? It must have been 
carted to the ferry, carried over the river in a boat, and again carted, and to a spot 
under the British guns. The writer has been unable to find any contemporary au- 
thority that it was thus moved. Again, if then burned, and after call had been 
made for claims for losses, and 443 were made, including apparently every sauce- 
pan and soap-barrel in the town, why does no claim, or trace of one, appear for 
this, that would have been the most precious thing in the place ? If such a claim 
has been lost from the file, there is still the Committee's list without it. 

The only contemporary statement that the writer has found on the subject is in 
a letter by John Adams (dated Philadelphia, July 7, 1775) to his wife. He ac- 
knowledges her letters of June 22 and 25, and after alluding to the burning of 
Charlestown, and then to the distresses of the people of Boston, he adds: "The 
loss of Mr. Mather's library, which was a collection of books and manuscripts made 
by himself, his father, his grandfather, and great grandfather, and was really very 
curious and valuable, is irreparable." ( Letters of, to his wife, 2 vols., Boston, 1841. ) 
His reference may be rather to Boston than to Charlestown, and he does not dis- 



100 A CENTUEY OP TOWN LIFE. 

societies also existed. Dec. 21, 1820, the " Second Social 
Library" in the town was founded, and the next year its 
name was changed to the Charlestoivn Union Library. For 
21 years it was the Athengeum, so to speak, of the place, its 
first proprietors being the members of the Ancient (1743), 
Phoenix (1795), and Washington (1800) Fire Societies, who 
gave their funds (-$975), and of the Library Society, contrib- 
uting over 200 volumes. Shares ($10) were also sold, on which 
there was an annual assessment (-$2). Several hundred books 
were added during the first year, and in 1828 there were 2,500, 
" many scarce and valuable, which if lost, it would be difficult 
to replace ; and some there are which could not be replaced " 
(see Cat., Bib., 1821). In the earlier years an "upper room 
in the southeasterly corner of the Town Hall " was used ; 
subsequently the northerly one on the second floor of the 

tinctly state that the library was in the latter place. Mrs. Adams, in her letter of 
the 25th referred to (Familiar Letters, N. Y., 1876, p. 72), after writing of the 
wishes and efforts of individuals to get out of Boston (some of whom she names), 
adds: "'T is certain they watch them so narrowly that they cannot escape. Mr. 
Mather got out a day or two before Charlestown was destroyed, and had lodged his 
papers and what else he got out at Mr. Carey's, but they were all consumed ; so 
were many other people's, who thought they might trust their little there till teams 
could be procured to remove them." Bright men as were the Mathers, it would 
seem to have been difficult for any one even of them, as a fugitive from beleaguered 
Boston, to have carried a large library across Charles River ; and if the books were 
previously sent to Mr. Cary's, they went to a house near the water-side. Kichard 
Gary claimed £1,560. on real (10, p. 157), but only £75. on personal property (see 
further, pp. 5, 123), and the unusually large sum of £9. 12 for cartage, showing 
that a great part of the latter, as was generally the case in tliat neighborhood, was 
removed; while John (287, p. 168) claimed only £78. personal, and the name of 
Mather does not appear in the list. 

Furtliermore, as is well known, a large number of books from the Mather library 
have long been owned by the American Antii^uarian Society at Worcester, and other 
specimens are in private collections. The writer may add that he has a few. 

In June, 1775, there was a great deal of excitement around Boston, and as is 
apt to be the case at such a time, strange reports were current, some of which Mr. 
and Mrs, Adams heard. For instance, she wrote to him (18th), "The battle began 
upon our intrenchments upon Bunker's Hill Saturday morning, about three o'clock, 
and has not ceased yet ; and it is now three o'clock Sabbath afternoon." (Life of 
J. A., 1856, I. 177.) After examining many details, the writer may here also add 
his belief tliat there are exaggerated estimates of certain losses by the burning of 
the town. It caused very great suffering, but, he thinks, less loss to art and liter- 
ature than some have supposed. 



LIBRARIES. 101 

Svvan-Hurd brick building (Plan I., 60), the latter a cosey 
apartment. By lot and sale the collection was dispersed 
March 21, 1842.^ There does not appear to have been in this 
library, even under the favorable conditions of its formation, 
any full collection of rare works about the town. 

While the " Union " was, on a small scale, the Boston 
Athenceum of the town, the Mlshawum Literary Association 
was its Mercantile Library. Founded Sep., 1851, it was after- 
wards, for years, the owner of a considerable Library of a 
popular nature, that was also, in time, dispersed. 

The earliest practical attempt to establish a Public Library 
originated in a petition of citizens, Jan. 20, 1853, and in offers 
made (Jan. 22) by Hon. G. W. Warren (1500), and (Jan. 24) 
by James Hunnewell ($1,500). Conditions in the offer of the 
former seem to have prevented its acceptance. To the offer 
of Mr. Hunnewell no such objection appeared, but no answer 
to his letter conveying it was ever received by him, and the 
money was given to other objects. After a while the project 
was revived ; a City Ordinance to establish the library was 
passed, June 4, 5, 1860 ; and a meeting for consultation fol- 
lowed, on July 14, together with a general subscription among 
the citizens. There had hitherto been no room as well fitted 
as desired for the library ; but, says the first report, " the re- 
cent erection of the Banking House of the Warren Savings 
Institution suggested a suitable place " for it. Of this Bank, 
four leading subscribers to the library fund were officers. A 
board of Trustees was chosen, afterwards elected annually ; 
T. T. Sawyer was chairman (and until annexation, 1873), four 
members were from the City Council, and five represented 
citizens at large. The first committee on the Catalogue (in- 
cluding acquisition of books) consisted of Richard Frothing- 
ham (a trustee 13 years), Jas. F. Hunnewell (8|- years), and 
Francis W. Hurd (1 year). The librarian was Geo. S. Poole, 
brother of W. F. Poole, LL.D., highly distinguished in like 
office. In 1862, the library was opened (Jan. 7), the printed 

1 A considerable number of the books were sent to the Hawaiian Islands by 
James Hunnewell, a shareholder, and the largest buyer at the sale (which he did 
not approve), and a fair number remain beside the writer. 



102 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

catalogue was ready (Oct. 30), the number of volumes was 
over 7,000, of deliveries 58,612, and of takers 3,519 (all to 
Nov. 15). Five years later there were 9,897 volumes; 1,094 
were rebound in 1867, 93 withdrawn, and 14 lost. Of borrow- 
ers there was a list of 8,352, and from the beginning the de- 
liveries amounted to 404,610. After annexation to Boston 
(1873) the library remained intact with its funds, in town 
where it belonged, and for this result Charlestown is much 
indebted to Dr. C. S. Cartde (librarian 1870-85), and Hon. 
T. T. Sawyer. Soon afterwards it was established on the sec- 
ond floor of the City Hall. The number of volumes Dec. 31, 
1886, was 26,428, and of deliveries (1886) 65,977, while the 
funds had increased to 811,500, and the institution is flourish- 
ing. There is one department, that ought to have precedence 
in every town library, for which the writer urged contributions. 
It is that of all publications relating to the place, to the natives 
and residents, or issued by them. No one can tell what local 
or personal information can or will be sometime wanted or 
needed, and in the town library this should be found. It is 
disheartening to see all the last novels in such a library, and 
no care for a copy of a memorial of one of the best old citi- 
zens ; to find the popular comic author from far away repre- 
sented, and not the books of a man who on the spot did good 
service long ago. Calls made on the public early in the sixties 
would, if in any general way responded to, have secured far 
more than they did. A little later the junk-dealer was very suc- 
cessful. A single pamphlet from each of two hundred persons 
(when 3,500 freely took out books), would have made a collec- 
tion that could be secured now only by great labor, if done by 
one person, as it now must be to become nearly the success 
then cheaply possible. Yet Charlestown, thanks to some good 
people, lias come to have this department fairly supplied. No 
one need, however, to feel that there is not still room for more, 
no matter how old or obscure seems the book or the pamphlet. 
The Sundai/ Schools have libraries such as the differing ideas 
of the owners suggest. In the High Scliool there is a fair and 
useful collection, and books are also gathered by various Soci- 
eties and Lodges. 



LIBK ARIES. 



103 



Of private collections it may be said that a large number of 
families or persons have their book-cases, for these are com- 
mon in New England. Of such collections long in a. family, 
there arc few in the town. The oldest of them known to the 
writer belongs to Miss Helen Hurd, who made it of service to 
him when he was writing his bibliography. Old pamphlets are 
preserved in it as they only are in a house occupied by one 
family for a century. 

One can but feel a certain due restraint in mentioning the 
private effects of others ; still it may be allowable to say that 
the professional gentlemen have had their collections for their 
own special uses. The Hon. Richard Frothingham, in his pur- 
suits as editor, public man, and author, gathered a large num- 
ber of volumes and pamphlets, that are preserved by his family. 
While, for rarities, he often relied on those owned by the So- 
cieties of which he was a member, he was by no means without 
them ; yet he would probably have defined his as a working 
library. Another of our well known literary citizens, Mr. John 
Boyle O'Reilly, is also credited with having things good and 
interesting. As collectors (not putting them out of the pale 
as readers), Mr. A. E. Cutter has books in fine bindings, largely 
English literature ; and also in the sunshine of Monument 
Square, Mr. E. N. Coburn has a large collection of Americana. 
Mr. H. H. Edes has, in the same lines, had some of the good 
fortune that follows enterprise and enthusiasm. 

Of the writer's library, a small foundation was laid over a 
hundred years ago, when some of his ancestors saved a few 
books. To these his father, starting about seventy years ago, 
made additions, including a number of volumes now scarce. 
Beo-inning in boyhood to save his gifts and purchases, the 
writer himself has slowly increased his collection with refer- 
ence to active or proposed uses, the nature of which is to some 
extent indicated by books that he has written. Naturally for 
such uses he would have not a few things that he has learned 
are hard to find elsewhere, and an interest in subjects and 
books combined has led him to obtain souvenirs of remarkable 
dispersed libraries, or former owners. 

In connection with libraries, literary societies of the town 



104 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

may be mentioned. Early in this century there were two 
Reading Societies, one at least of which became merged in 
the Union Library already described. Of what are called 
Reading Rooms, there was one connected with the Washing- 
ton Hall Association (1813) ; another, called the Bunker Hill 
Library Association, was incorporated in 1854, and this and a 
News Room in the Square were continued for years. All of 
them, it is said, were centres of local gossip. In 1829, a De- 
hating Society was formed by about 30 young men ; a Me- 
chanics Library Association, March 6, 1841, but of short 
duration; and in 1853, the Mishawum Literary Association, 
already mentioned. During the second quarter of this cen- 
tury, there were throughout the State organizations that might 
be classed with the literary, and of which the town had its 
representative, a good one, long a favorite, — the Charlestown 
Lyceum, opened Jan. 5, 1830. Each winter, attended by a 
great deal of Charlestown, there was a course of lectures, 
many of which were by prominent writers and speakers, the 
Hon. Edward Everett giving an admirable start with his Ad- 
dress at the 200th Anniversary of the Arrival of Gov. Win- 
throp, delivered June 28, 1830. This was one of the few 
"centennials" in the town, not connected with Bunker Hill, 
that have been specially commemorated. 



SOCIAL HISTORY. 

The social history, important a part as it is of the History of 
a town, is seldom accurately written ; indeed, a great deal that 
is distinctive in its character, or even a simple detail of facts, 
is unrecorded. There is little or nothing, for instance, written 
or printed about the earlier parties where the local society was 
gathered, to tell how tliey looked, who was there, or what was 
done. Biographies and memoirs now and then tell something, 
but they are as a})t not to be of use in this respect as they are 
in not giving accounts of what really shaped the lives of which 
they treat. It is a question, moreover, if private affairs, like 
characters in private life, are to be treated like matters of public 



SOCIAL HISTOEY. 105 

history ; still the annals of a place are incomplete without some 
account of its society, and a few remarks may be permitted. 

General statements are perhaps all that can now be made 
about society in the town during the earlier part of the present 
century. At that time there appear to have been few families 
established for a long while in any one house (examples, p. 37), 
and styles of living, like the means, were simple (p. 37). Be- 
sides this lack of permanence, there was also that of numbers 
sufficient for any large social development; and furthermore 
great diversity of opinions and feelings existed, as is stated by 
President Dwight (Travels, 1821, 1. 467), and in records (p. 26). 
Even external matters that helped to make later homes pleas- 
ant were wanting, as a longer time was required for trees and 
gardens to grow into fine condition. 

A glimpse of earlier social life is given in a memoir of Judge 
Dana (p. 275), who lived in town from 1808 to 1813 (in the 
Kettell house, p. 92). " He kept a fine pair of horses, which, 
in the fashion of the day, he drove tandem in a gig. . . . Some- 
times a town-meeting, when political affairs were under discus- 
sion, would become so unmanageable that the moderator would 
resign, and Mr. Dana be sent for ; " and when Mrs. Dana gave 
a party " she baked about three times as much cake as was re- 
quired for her guests, because the married ladies were accus- 
tomed to bring to parties good-sized bags, and, on leaving, to 
revisit the supper-table and take home the bags well filled for 
the children." Some forty years later the writer has seen a 
survival of this practice at " Temperance Levees," or suppers for 
charitable objects, given in the old Town Hall. Drinking hab- 
its, in varying degree, continued some time into the present 
century, so that it was hardly civil to receive a call, even from 
the minister, without an offer of a glass of something, — to the 
minister it would be wine. As late as 1818, a church council 
of 84 persons had at their dinner 9 decanters of brandy, etc., 
40 bottles of wine, and 144 cigars, besides pipes (Hist. Harvard 
Ch., 169). The style of furnishing houses has already been 
mentioned (pp. 37, 38). 

Fashions in dress (except official), as indeed they always 
have, followed, at some distance of time as well as of place, 



106 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

those of town-life in Europe. A few of the earlier prominent 
men must have had an imposing look. Portraits show us Na- 
thaniel Gorham and Samuel Dexter in ruffled bosoms, and text 
(Mem., p. 275) informs us that Thomas Russell, nearly six 
feet high, appeared on Change in hair powdered and tied, a 
cocked hat, and a " sable-lined silk great-coat from Russia," 
while he carried "a gold-headed India cane." The minister 
wore powdered hair and small clothes, and in the pulpit, bands, 
and a very full black gown (as did his successors, the latter 
until 1871). Numerous officers of the Navy, connected with 
the Yard, wore more brilliant costumes than have been adopted 
since 1861 ; and the local militia, and, at a later period, the 
firemen, used brighter colors, and more of them, than they have 
of late. At the same time there was a great aversion to dis- 
tinctive dresses in most of the civil service, or occupations, and 
only in recent years have these become established, adding 
much to the usefulness and good looks of the police, postmen, 
and railroad staff. 

Towards the middle of the century, and awhile after it, a 
good old practice was continued, or was revived. Children 
whose parents lived in the town, settled there also, and the re- 
sult was a fair amount of society attached to the place, and 
giving it character and attractiveness. How to keep near the 
old homes, and not liow to get away from them, was then tlie 
question. Hence there were houses of parents and of children, 
and of many who were related or connected. Religious soci- 
eties to a considerable extent made social groups, and, although 
these differed, all were pleasant. As time passed there was 
less of this division, and more mingling. The town also at- 
tracted not a few whose value was felt in society as in other 
relations. There could, from these various causes, hardly have 
been a pleasantcr period than for perhaps fifty years after 1830. 
A certain amount of fashion, along with a good deal that was 
quite as substantial and cared not much for it, has existed. 
Many handsome parties have been given, where, notably, or dis- 
tinctively, dancing and cards were the favorite entertainments. 

Since society leaves slight record of itself, we should not fail 
to remember the ladies who certainly did quite as much to make 



SOCIAL HISTORY. 107 

life pleasant, as did some of the men in politics who thus had 
their names put in type. Those who are familiar with the old 
town will recall, it may be allowable to say here, besides others, 
Mrs. Baker, Mrs. Budington, Mrs. Henry Forster, Mrs. Glidden, 
Mrs. Hubbell, Mrs. John Hurd, Mrs. Geo. A. Kettell, Mrs. James 
Lee, Mrs. Henry Lyon, Mrs. Susan Pierce, and Mrs. Geo. W. 
Warren. In the Eeports of Benevolent Societies, to which the 
Bibliography directs, and on the Records of the Churches, is a 
far longer list of names than can be given here of ladies who 
have also been distinguished in good works. 

Among prominent visitors entertained in the town have been 
General Washington by Major Ben. Frothingham (p. 151), 
Prince Talleyrand by the Rev. Dr. Morse and some of his pa- 
rishioners, General Lafayette by Colonel Jaques in 1825, and 
General U. S. Grant by the Hon. Geo. W. Warren. H. Da- 
vidson gave a handsome reception to General Jackson (who is 
said to have been unable to attend). James Hunnewell enter- 
tained (for some days) Haalilio when on his mission that se- 
cured the independence of his country ; and later the Princes 
Lot and Alexander, afterwards Kamehameha TV. and V. Queen 
Kapiolani, and the Princess Liliuokalani (1887), and (1871) 
the first Japanese minister to the U. S. (at one of his earliest 
dinners in N. E.) have been guests of the writer. Two very 
prominent societies, the Massachusetts Historical and the Amer- 
ican Antiquarian, have lunched with the Hon. Richard Froth- 
ingham (whose son, Thos. G., is one of the few in town who 
maintain his father's style of hospitality). Twice the latter 
society has lunched with the writer. Some of the notable balls 
of former days have been already mentioned (p. 118). What 
might be called the society of the older period may be said to 
have culminated in the " sociables " and " Shakespeares " during 
the winter of 1881-82, when nearly thirty parties, all pleasant, 
were given, making a season perhaps unique in the town. Since 
that time there have been great changes. 

Associations having more or less of a social nature have ex- 
isted during a century past, but during the last twenty or thirty 
years their number and memberships have ver}' much increased, 
so that a list of them with their ofticers fills no small space in 



108 A CENTURY OF TOWN LIFE. 

the local papers where it is from time to time given. In each 
of the churches there is also an organization, or more than one, 
that is intended to bring the people together, and hence is social 
in character. 

Unavoidable change must of course attend the growth of a 
population from comparatively small numbers of similar de- 
scent, most of whom knew each other, and where some families 
were large, to several-fold greater numbers, coming from many 
sources and having less in common. As the old semi-rural 
Main Street can never again exist, so also there cannot be, in 
the nature of things, the old and often intimately connected 
society. The moving out and the moving in that has continu- 
ally been going on, has carried away many who were valued, 
and has brought more not yet as familiar. Scattered widely 
are those who in some way have been connected with the old 
town, numerous enough to surprise one, — some, as the world 
goes, to find themselves better off, some who can count their 
days on its ground their best. In the pendulous swing of Amer- 
ican movement, change after change has gone on, yet still there 
were those who lived in, and stood by, the old place, and faith 
in the country and people, along witli what the past teaches, 
makes us feel that the future will not in this way differ. 

In practical matters as well as in precious historic associa- 
tions, Charlestown has advantages. It is near business parts 
of Boston as well as to a great deal else, and has plenty of sun- 
light, good air, and drainage, besides a fair amount of firm land, 
put, as an old townsman said, where the Creator thought it 
should be. There is only one Bunker Hill in the metropolis of 
New England, and if the height where the embattled founders 
of the Republic stood life in hand, or fell ready sacrifice to so 
much that we hold priceless, is not prized and kept in due 
order, as it has been and is, another era than theirs and their 
children's comes for the country. 




•!•>€ **\i-r^ O 





f / 








PLANS OF CHAELESTOWN. 

THE VILLAGE IN 1638. 



THE houses, grounds, and occupants are shown according to the 
Book of Possessions (1638), printed in the Third Report of 
the Record Commissioners of Boston, 1883. This Book is a record 
of the estates of the inhabitants acquired " by purchase, by gift from 
the town, or by allotments, as they were divided among them by a 
joint consent after the General Court had settled their bounds by 
granting eight miles from the old meeting-house into the country." 
(Hist. C, 66.) 

With such means and authority it might seem easy to locate the 
houses and lands in the village close to the river opposite Boston ; 
but any one who begins afresh will encounter an uncommonly pretty 
puzzle, and can well agree with Mr. Frothingham (Hist., p. 2), that 
while the Book "is valuable so far as it goes," it "is exceedingly 
loose in description;" indeed, as he adds (p. 66), that "many of the 
descriptions are so indefinite that it is difficult, if not impossible, to 
locate the lots." Measures of length are not given ; often there is 
not even a hint of the size of an area ; points of compass are some- 
times omitted, or repeated incorrectly on the same lot ; certain estates 
bound on possessions of persons who by the list possessed nothing, or 
nothing there ; not a highway has its present name or exact line ; 
there is no geographical order ; two important pages were lost many 
years ago; and, to add a little more perplexity, the accounts of the 
lots are scattered promiscuously through the volume. Slight help is 
given by previous writers. Mr. Frothingham has, in a general way, 
located a very few of the houses. The "Estates" (1879) is only 
abbreviated copy from the Book, with feW attempts at " the develop- 
ment of localities which it is proposed to elucidate" (p. 2), and then 
not always correct, though helping at a few points. 

Making a map of streets as they are from three or four plans that 
were on a large enough scale, and marking them with black lines, in 



110 THE VILIjAGE in 1638. 

order that the Plan could be understood better, the writer has fitted 
the lots together (marked by dotted lines) according to the Book, 
referring by figures on each to the page where description is given, 
and joining the abutters as tliere named, and as copied also on the 
Plan. In some cases lines coincide, or nearly coincide, with existing 
estates; in other cases it would be very difficult, or impossible, to 
make them. If it is necessary to establish this identity in any case, 
the only course is to employ a good conveyancer and surveyor, quite 
possibly with the chance that they will be either well tried or quite 
baffled. This remark applies also to the second, and following, 
survey. 

The Plan, as stated, shows the houses and occupants and their 
positions with some approach to order and correctness, and, it may 
be fairly considered, gives a much clearer idea than has yet been 
given of the oldest village on the central part of Massachusetts bay 
when it was nine years old. 

A few particulars about the Plan and other parts of the town should 
be added. The position of ''The Great House'' built (1629-30) for 
Gov. Winthrop, and the earliest court and the meeting-house, and 
(1638) the tavern, is determined from deeds, and Leach's sketch 
(1780). The Parish Lands are from a plan made in 1835, and the 
probable place of the ministers' houses is deduced from their bounds. 
The Rev. John Harvard would probably have lived between them 
and Mr. Nowell, the first signer of the Covenant (1632); but the 
descriptions of his estate, like those of the ministers and of Major 
Wm. Phillips, are lost. 

At the north of the area in the Plan were three estates bounded 
S. "W. by "the streete way," and N. E. by Back St., Geo. Bunker's 
[36, no. 21] ''little house" and garden, Thos. Caule's garden [73, 
no. 2], and Robt. Leach's house and garden [72]. This was bounded 
N. W. by " Geo. Bunker's house" which the writer does not identify, 
and between his no. 21 and P. Pratt is land also undetermined. 
There seems to have been a nucleus of what was later called the 
Mill Village, half a mile north near the junction of Main, Eden and 
other streets, and another small group to suggest the later Neck 
Village. In the rural parts inland were scattered houses. At the 
east there were on that side of the "back street" successively from 
near Henley St., Eliz. Cetcherall's house and garden [60], Wm. Dade's 
two acres [22], Ed. Converse's [11, no. 3] "acre and a liaulfe of 
earable land by estimation" (a favorite way of measuring the "Pos- 
sessions"), and Sam. Carter's [15, no. 2] two acres of the like with 



THE VILLAGE IN 1633. Ill 

a house. From the lower (right) corner of the Plan towards the 
present Navrj Yard, there were, bounded S. E. by the harbor, John 
Beridge's [19] house and garden; next Will. Stidson's [5G] house and 
two acres, N. E. were a highway (or Wapping St.) and a part of 
Back St., and then, side by side, S. E. on Wapping dock, Thos. 
Coytmore's [28] house and two acres, and Walter Palmer's [31] 
house and two acres. Close by was Will. Brackenbury's [13, no. 3] 
house with half an acre. In the east field, on "the higliway towards 
mistick river," Geo. Bunker [36, no. 1] had two acres and a house, 
and S. on Wapping St. Will. Quick [70] had a house and garden, and 
Isaac Cole [76] also had a house and garden. Farther eastward, at 
^^ Sconce pointy'' was a row of four estates, all S. E. on the harbor, 
beginning with Augustine Walker's lot [50] S. W. and N. W. on 
"the marsh," and continued by James Garrett's [51] house and garden, 
Steeven fforsdick's [70] house and garden, and Henry Larrence's [39] 
house and garden. N. of the latter two were Thos. Knowhor's [59] 
house and garden, and Thos. Moulton's [38] house and garden, the 
last N. on Wapping Street. There was a condition in Walker's [50] 
"reserving libertie of way sufficient for the servis of the ffort," and 
one in Garrett's [51] "not hindering the highway about the batterie." 
Reference is here made to the fortification ordered by the General 
Court, Sept. 3, 1634, to be "made att the poynte neere Robte Moul- 
tons, att Charlton" [Mass. Records, 1853, I. 124], and that, with one 
slight change of place, was maintained, chiefly at the expense of the 
town, until the Revolution [R. Frothingham, Hist. C, 98, who adds 
that "it was situated near Swett's wharf"]. 

The village extended along the westerly bank of Charles River 
from a point at the inner end of the harbor, and also around the 
Town (Windmill) Hill. Northerly from this hill there were only 
scattered hoiases. On the Plan are shown 45 houses (perhaps 2 more 
unlocated), 1 barn, 2 storehouses, and 2 malt or brew houses. Added 
in the above account, N. and E., are 17 more houses, making a total 
of 67 (or 69?) buildings, all of which were undoubtedly simple, while 
the streets or lanes were narrower than their modern representatives 
on the Plan. Gradually the village increased eastward, northward, 
and over the area shown in the Plan, until its destruction in 1775. 



PLANS OF THE TOWN OF CHARLESTOWN 

WHEN BURNED IN 1775, AND AFTERWARDS REBUILT. 

Although the destruction of this town in 1775 was, up to that 
time, one of the most important events personally known to the people 
of Massachusetts, yet no exact account of it or of most of the things 
burned, or anything that can be called a plan or accurate near view, 
appears to be now known, or, indeed, ever to have existed. General 
statements of course there are ; but in trying to form a clear idea of 
the extent and characteristics of the town, the writer found that it 
could only be obtained by a laborious examination and connection of 
such separate authorities as relate to the subject. These are, (1) the 
List of Claims for Losses made by a Committee in 1776, and printed 
herein, pp. 154-74; (2) a collection of 443 MSS,, with details, often 
minute, of these losses; (3) a MS. "Account" among the "Lowell 
Papers," owned by the Mass. Historical Soc. ; (4) a MS. " Plan of 
the new streets," etc., 1780, "surveyed by John Leach," at the office 
of the Secretary of State, Boston ; (5) the deeds at the County 
Registry in Cambridge ; (G) a Memorial of Citizens for compensation 
made to the 23d Congress, 1834; (7) details of various claims in the 
Massachusetts Archives, Vols. 138 and 139; and (8) the "Gene- 
alogies and Estates of Charlestown," 1880.-^ 

No one of these, alone, gives any clear idea of the subject, or even 
of its details ; but they must be laboriously examined, compared, and 
arranged. The List of Claims (1) gives the amounts of losses on real 
and personal estate, but no details of houses, articles, or local position. 
The collection (2) enumerates buildings, in a few cases with great 
detail, but generally with little ; also crops, fences, shop goods, and 
furniture, usually with particulars ; but gives, singularly, little topo- 
graphical information. In the Account (3) appear only names of 
owners or occupants of 76 houses, 41 "Barraks," and 102 "cellars," 
in all, 219 of these, or much less than the actual number of buildings 
(380 by church record), besides omitting a large part of the personal 
losses. The " Plan " (4) is a rough sketch, quite without scale, to 

^ (1 and 2) are town property ; (1) has been copied b)' tlie writer ; (3) has also 
been copied by him, and for permission to do so lie is indebted to the coiu-tesy of 
the Mass, Historical Society ; (4) is open to the public at the State House, where 
a copy was made for the writer; (5) is as stated above, and (6) can be found in 
libraries; (7) is also public, and (8) is a published work. 




-Tori- of' jDOS'/ibx- 



THE TOWN IN 1775, 113 

indicate changes proposed in the Square, and "Water, Henley, and 
Main streets, only in part effected. Main St. is shown impossibly 
sti'aight, and only meagre information is given by names or figures ; 
yet valuable evidence is found about the site of the " Great House." 
The deeds (5) afford the best of all available information, and yet 
sometimes leave the position of estates a puzzle. They are open to 
the public, and are admirably indexed and arranged. A portion of 
(6) will be found in (7), together with a moderate amount of curious 
detail. In regard to over three hundred estates the writer has ex- 
amined (8) and has found many clews and statements that he has 
used ; but the lack of topographical arrangement, and a scattering 
of details, makes it perplexing, and its references to losses are imper-'' 
feet. The recorded deeds (5) have no substitute. «^ 

Of maps or plans ^ of the town made later after the fire, there is one 
by Samuel Thompson, on a small scale, in MS.,^ dated Dec. 1794, 
showing the whole area, but no plan of the burnt district giving even 
available hints. The first real map of the streets, not made until 
1818, was by Peter Tufts, but its scale is so small that it is of no help 
here, and furthermore some of its lines (as, for instance, the block 
bounded by Harvard, Bow, and Arrow streets) do not appear to be 
correct. It should be added that the early plans of the Battle 'of 
Bunker Hill, while very valuable about the field itself, which is care- 
fully shown, and while giving well the upper part of Main St. and 
some of the outer roads, are evidently imperfect in regard to the 
streets in the lower, or chiefly settled streets of the town. Here the 
Plan by Lieut. Page is the least imperfect ; that of De Berniere 
might almost be called preposterous ; Smith's Plan (heliotyped in the 
writer's Bibliography of B. H.), the earliest American, is based on 
that of Page. 

In drawing Plans of the burnt district of 1775 the writer has 
copied from several (fifty years or less old) that were of sufficient 
scale, although in this all of them varied, and has shown the district 
substantially as it is now divided, but on it the estates that then 
existed (many of which remain), some of which are accurately given, 
and others approximately, or with sufficient exactness for the purpose 
in view. In describing the estates he has named the occupants in 
1775, and at the same time gives notes about their successors, and 
also about the buildings now or hitherto on the ground. It is, 

^ The Town " Survey," 1767, is text only, but its items afford some help. 
* In the Massachusetts Archives, from which it was copied for the Vriter. 

8 . . . 



114 THE GREAT HOUSE. 

indeed, such a survey as we wish some one had made in 1775, and 
one that may be of value in the future. 

This survey we begin at lot 1, Plan I., the site of the "Great 
House" built (1629-30) for Gov. Winthrop, occupied by him, for 
sessions of the Court, as a place of worship, and then (1635) sold for 
£30. to Robert Long. In the Book of Possessions (p. 6) the estate 
is described as "one Roode and a haufe of grounde by estimation, 
more or lesse, scituate on the south of the mill hill, butting " S. E. 
and N. E. on the market place, N. by the meeting-house lane, and 
S. AY. " by the high streete, with a dwelling house upon it and other 
aptinances." This house is believed to have stood until it was burned, 
June 17, 1775, and in it Robt. Long kept an Ordinary, or tavern, 
until his death (1663). It is hard enough to trace the ownership of 
this " Possession," but as it is the site of the earliest historic building 
within the present limits of Boston, we should make it an exception 
among the estates of the town, and briefly note how it was held. 
Robert Long's heirs sold the estate (1673) to "brother John Long," 
whose widow Mary sold (1704) "a small piece" to Henry Cookery, 
and (1711) "the great tavern" itself to her son Samuel. Of him 
Eben' Breed bought (1711) one half of the "old tavern" (1 C). 
Mr. Frothingham says that " the estate [meaning all] remained in 
the possession of Mr. Breed's heirs [from 1754, when he died] until 
the town purchased it to form a part of the Square." But he owned 
only one half, and Charles Russell (1712-13) bought another half of 
the " 3 Crane Tavern " (D.), which passed to Chambers Russell. 
Notwithstanding this, it is stated (G. and E., 626) that Mary Long 
devised (1720) the tavern, and left it (1729) to Samuel Long, and 
also (do., 864) that Sarah, widow of Samuel Long, who married Geo. 
Shore, left (1744) the "Three Cranes," occupied by John Gardner, 
to her husband; and furthermore that Brown (Thomas, do., 142, 
called Nath'l on p. 24), innholder, bought (1746) of Chambers Russell 
the "3 Cranes," and (1766) mortgaged it to the Ancient and Hon. 
Artillery Co., the discharge not being made until June 17, 1794. 
This not very lucid account of ownership is, however, clearer than 
the separate statements of the shape of the lots into which the Pos- 
session became divided. Even the exact site of the first Govern- 
ment building of Massachusetts Bay can hardly be determined until 
the exact position of a certain post in Mary Long's fence is known. 
Mr. Wyman says (p. 24) that the lot mortgaged in 1766 is the City 
Hall lot (Plan I., 2); but the deeds show that it could not have been, 
and the Leach sketch helps to solve the riddle, and also to prove the 




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96 




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Jo I Tier 



THE TOWN IN 1775. 115 

correctness of Mr. Frothingham's statement that " the Great House 
stood wholly in the Square, and opposite " the centre of the present 
"Waverly House," — a fact that he, it is very likely, had from per- 
sons who had seen the old building. Confused by the first remark, 
but guided by the last two named, the bounds in the deeds become 
comprehensible, and other divisions are explained. 

In 1700 (deed, vol. 12, 656), Henry Cookery, "marriner," for £70., 
bought of (Maj.) John Cutler a "messuage," — yards, gardens, or- 
chards, houses, etc. (1 A), — bounded (but without feet given) N. 
and E. on Mary Long, S. and W. "upon an alley or passage neer 
the public meeting house," and 1706 (deeds, vol. 14, 88), as an inn- 
holder, of Mary Long, "a small piece of ground" (IB), for £40. 
(N. W. 54 on H. C. ; S. E. 54 on M. L. ; S. ^Y. 30 on Town St. ; 
N. E. 30 on land and garden fence of M. L.). In 1718 (vol. 19, 260) 
for £200. his heirs sold Wm. Wyer a lot (A), S. on street 29 ^ ft. ; 
W. on street from the meeting-house, 102.j ft.; N. on alley near do., 
23 ft. ; E. on land of late Capt. John Long. David Wyer inherited 
(1747) of Wm. his father, house and shop bought of Cookery (1718), 
and sold (1755) to Jas. Russell, who sold (1759) to Rich^^ Phillips, 
and he (1764) to Irene Prentice (died 1791), daughter of Rev. Thos., 
settled minister of Charlestown. The bounds, 1764, are within a few 
inches those of 1718, and are described similarly, with the added 
particular that N. is on alley at E. end of the meeting-house. Thus 
these lots, fronted by the Breed and Russell purchases (C. D.), together 
form a block that could only have stood " wholly in the Square," as 
is proved by the Leach sketch, quite out of scale and bearings as the 
block is there, and with figures of dimensions only in part agreeing 
with those in the deeds, yet there measuring only 5 % more area 
than in the guess-work of 1638. 

The whole area of the Possession is now in the open space of the 
Square, and not a vestige of the buildings once on it remains above 
ground. Charred timbers, it is said, were dug up here years ago. 

Close by the " Great House " stood the meeting-house of the town, 
and really the most important building there, in or before 1775. 
References to it are found, and its position, somewhere near the east 
end of the present City Hall, is known. Yet it is a strange fact, 
that an exact description of it and of its site does not appear to exist. 
In many other countries a building so identified with the religion of 
the people would not have thus perished from thought as well as from 
sight. The slightness of its material seems to have been a symbol 
of the really slight consecration it was felt to give the ground where 



116 MAIIKET PLACE, NORTH SIDE. 

it stood. In the losses it (467) was valued at £3,000. Near by 
stood the Court-house, valued (465) at £800., of the exact description 
and site of which, also, nothing has been found by the writer. 

The most precise information we have about the sites of both these 
buildings is given by those who knew them. Dr. Bartlett (1813) 
says that the meeting-house stood on the Square (in front of 3, 
Plan T.), and the Court-house in front of the Russell estate (do., 28, 
29), which may have been on 1 E. Judge Jas. Winthrop (1818), 
in connection with Gen. Dearborn's account of the battle refers to 
" the northern side of the Square, where the Court-house stood," 
adding that "after the destruction of the Town, the places of the 
Court-house and Meeting-house were cleared of the ruins to form the 
present Square." Their probable sites are indicated on Plan I. 

On 2 appear to have stood the two houses of the ministers, valued 
(claim 470) £1,100., and long occupied by the pastors of the town, as 
well as by Rev. Hull Abbot and Rev. Thos. Prentice. (As shown 
by a deed (1766) the former may have been on 1 E.). The latter owned 
real property elsewhere, and claimed (119) on it, or on something here. 
Neither of them appears to have lost much personal estate. 
* The other losses on 1 and 2 appear to have been in those of John 
Wyer (14), Ephraim Breed (48), and Ebexezer Breed (12). 

Next north, and fronting the Square, is an estate, 3, sold (1785) 
by the widow Mary Scottoav. She stated (Coll. No. 2) that she 
lost her "Two Dwelling Houses adjoining together Near the Back 
of the Meetinghouse," valued at £225. Matthew Bridge, who came 
from Lexington (Nov. 14, 1785), bought of her (1785) when the 
three-storied wooden house, now standing here, was new. Its front, 
clapboarded and painted brown, is about 36 ft. wide. As has been 
the case for over forty years the lower story is used for business and 
the upper part for tenements. In 1814 EbenT Baker, who had mar- 
ried Miss Bridge, lived here. She then inherited her father's large 
wooden house (Plan II., 44 A) on Harvard St., and probably then 
went to it. The estate is still held by the widow of her son, thus 
making one of the few instances now in town of an estate held by 
the same family for over a century. Besides personal acquaintance 
with the owners since the first Mr. Bridge, the writer knew the house 
well when a scholar in the " Classical School " kept in it by Dr. J. 
H. Holmes (1847 and earlier), and attended by boys of several well- 
known families. Changes are so great that as far as the writer is 
aware he has been for many years the only one of these scholars who 
has been a householder in the town. 



THE TOWN IN 1776. 117 

Adjoining is 4, a small lot owned perhaps fifty years by the family 
of Jos. Austin, who claimed (16) for loss (house and shop), and 
inherited the land (1784). He soon sold (1785) to Thos. Powers, 
who sold (1792) to Nath. Gorham, whose "store" is here on a plan 
dated 1796. An old wooden building here, three stories high, has 
(1887) been replaced by a new brick store. 

Next, at 6, is a plain red brick building, 43 ft. front, three stories 
high, and with a tall sloping and slated roof. The lower story has 
been occupied for many years by A. N. Swallow & Co., grocers, suc- 
cessors of the firm Sawtell & Jacobs in the same business. The 
upper part has been used by societies and for business. This estate 
contained the mansion of Edward Sheafe, sold after his death to 
Caleb Call, and by him. May 11, 1772 (for £393. 6. 8) to Nathan- 
iel Gorham, who, Aug. 29, 1772, mortgaged it as "the house 
wherein I now dwell," to Jas. Bowdoin (for £200.). Mr. Gorham, 
who claimed (18) in 1775, died intestate in 1796, and his heirs (1813) 
sold the lot to Geo. Bartlett, who sold it in 1845. Long ago the 
house of Mr. Gorham (built after the conflagration) disappeared. It 
must have stood close upon the street, and could hardly have been 
a fine one, but it was for several years the residence of the citizen 
of the town who reached the highest official position attained by any 
of its natives. A long narrow strip of land behind, for many years 
used for stables, sheds, etc., extends to the open space on Town Hill. 

Beyond is another long narrow estate (6) reaching to the same 
space. In 1772 Thos. Austin sold it to D. Wait, who claimed (19) 
for loss (house, bakehouse, barn, shop, work and smoke house) in 
1775, and whose heirs sold it in 1816. In 1796 his house appears 
to have been 34 ft. deep. The present building, quite different from 
the original, is of wood, three stories high, clapboarded, painted gray, 
and is used for business. 

Next, and reaching to an alley to Town Hill, and up it to the 
open space, is a large estate (7) bought by Sam. Swan, 1756, who 
claimed (20) for loss of house and barn. As a store it was sold to 
Caleb Swan (1796), who (1796) sold to Cotton Center, a grocer, 
who came from Woburn (Apr., 1785). He sold to R. Center, 
1809-14, who (1818) mortgaged to I. Warren, and the latter's son, 
Geo. W., inherited it. The present owner is Rhodes Lockwood. 
On Town Hill are wooden dwellings, and on Main St. a modern 
style of apartment-house built of brick, five stories high, with stores 
on the lower floor, and three bay windows reaching up the other 
stories to the flat roof. This structure is developed from " Wash- 



118 MAIN ST., NEAR THE SQUARE. 

ington Hall," in which G. W. Warren arranged a large room for 
parties. The "Bachelors' Ball," given here by George T. Upham, 
Constantine F. Newell, and Walter Hastings, was one of the earlier, 
and was a fashionable event of the time. At the "^thon " (1861) and 
Quadrille (1854) parties were also gathered many once well known in 
town. Subsequently the place had the experiences apt to befall its 
like. Among personal associations with this estate there are two 
that are very notable. Here probably lived, although for a short time, 
Kev. John Harvard, and here Judge Sewall visited. 

The block (8, 9) bounded by the alley, Main St., and Henley St. 
was the home estate of Increase Nowell, first signer of the Church 
Covenant, who died 1655, and from whose widow it passed (1675) 
to W" Hilton. In 1706 Eleazer Phillips bought the southerly part 
(40 ft. wide), and (1709) his son Eleazer inherited some of it (8). 
This son, who died 1763, was the only bookseller and publisher in the 
town before the Revolution, but the works issued by him (see p. 264) 
are now of great rarity. The end of the Phillips part on Town Hill 
was divided into two small estates, on one of which is a two-storied 
house built of split stone, now occupied hy the Charlcstown Free Dis- 
pensary. On Main St. there is a block of plain red brick buildings, 
three stories high, with stores below and dwellings, etc., above. The 
Leach sketch (1780) places on 9 "Doc. Graves," and the Heirs of 
Gary (111) claimed "for Docf Graves' house." (The same sketch 
puts "Austins" only at 8.) Three or four houses, apparently, were 
burned (1775) on this block. Main St. was (1767) here 27 ft. wide. 

At the corner of Henley St. and Main St. (10) now stands the 
large square building of the Warren Institution for Savings, three 
tall stories high, built of red bricks, with a brownstone front and 
brownstone " trimmings " elsewhere, and covered by a high so-called 
French slated roof with a broad flat top. It was built (1859) from 
designs by J. II. Rand, in no defined (but what is termed "modern") 
style, and is one of the largest and most expensive business buildings 
ever on the peninsula. Here a house given to the town by R. Sprague 
was sold (1732) to S. Henley. After ownership by him and some 
of his heirs, his son Samuel held the estate and claimed (109) for 
losses in 1775. Mr. Henley's account of his house is one of the 
fullest descriptions that appears among the claims, and is as follows : 
"A large Elegant Mansion House three Stories high painted inside 
and out in the Best manner the upper chambers all plasterd five 
Rooms on a floer with large Iron Backs in every Room and Chamber 
(but one), that in my Kitching weigh^ Better then Two hundred wait, 



THE TOWN IN 1775. 119 

The Best Room was finish? with very handsom Hangings which cost 
me about Twenty three pounds Lawful and Two Rooms with very 
good Paper. A very handsom Entry finish? with Carv? work, 
winscott and paper — five Chambers the Best Chamber a very good 
paper and a marble hearth that Cost Ten pounds Lawful, and each 
side the Chimney carv? work and winscott. A handsom Turit on 
said House with an Elictrick Wyer, long & large A very good Cellar 
under the whole House, with many plank petitions, Doars, and Locks, 
the House was finish!^ in the best manner Two Rooms winscotted. 
Chair high Stone hearths and Jams. A Counting Room at the End 
of my House, cost me about forty pounds Lawful money. Shutters 
and Iron fastnings to all the windows in the House in the best man- 
ner — About three quarters of said House was built about Nine years 
before it was Burnt which I look upon to be worth at least Farthing 
£2,000. lawful money." He was distiller, trader, church-member, 
town treasurer, father of 20 children, and the richest man on the 
peninsula in 1775. He was enterprising, and, if stories of some 
old persons could be believed, he had a vigorous temper. His daugh- 
ter Elizabeth married Sir Grenville Temple, and was one of the 
very few natives of the town who had a knighted husband. After 
Capt. Henley's death (1795) the estate eventually stood in other 
names. 

Next lived John White, who had married Mary, sister of Capt. 
Henley, and who (198) claimed £420. for a dwelling and shop with 
^ a brick wall between it and his house. Isaac Codman, who had 
married Abigail Foster, stated a loss of a store, chocolate mill, and 
personal, between Main and " back st." and next J. White. 

Between the Bank and a narrow alley is a large estate (11), that 
for many years stood in the name of Bradstreet, and on Main St. is 
now occupied by a much altered, old, three-storied wooden building, 
well finished inside, long the shop and home of Katharine B. On 
the lower floor was the once well-known dry-goods store of W" 
Arnold, and later, for nearly forty years the bookstore of McKim 
and Cutter, A. E. Cutter, and F. M. Reed. On the former garden 
for a long while has stood another but plainer three-storied wooden 
building in business use. Leach gives no note of this estate. Sheriff 
Richard Foster (who died 1774) left his daughter Abigail a house 
on Main St., and Sarah the Bradstreet lot that she occupied. The 
former was the wife of Isaac Codman (202), and the latter of Sam. 
Bradstreet and a claimant (199) for a small loss on personal estate. 
Claim (123) was made for the Estate of Richard Foster (old 



120 MARKET PLACE, EAST SIDE. 

house -where Mrs. Bradstreet lived). Half of a house here occupied 
by Sam. B. and Isaac F. (claim 24) was sold (1770) by him to his 
daughters. Mary Austin stated that she lost a house " between Capt. 
Isaac foster and Mr. Richard Bouylstown," valued at £266. 13. 4. By 
the "Survey" of 1767 the house of the "Widow Johnson" appears to 
have been near this place. 

At the S. E. corner of the alley is a small lot (12) covered by an 
old three-storied wooden building with a store on the lower floor of 
the front end on Main St. Joseph Dowse claimed (116) for loss 
1775, and S. Dowse bought here (1785), it seems. 

Adjoining is a block of plain three-storied brick buildings (pi. 13), 
on the lower floors of which have been stores for many years, and 
in the upper, dwellings or offices. In the third story, at the south- 
erly end, Mr. Caleb Rand has printed for a long time. The estate 
belonged to Dr. Isaac Rand, who claimed (117) for loss, 1775 (house 
and barn), and sold the lot, with cellars (1786), to S. Dowse. 

At 14 is a low and narrow three-storied building with a plain front 
of hewn granite, built for the Phcenix Bank (in operation between 
1832 and 1842), and subsequently used for other business. 

At 15 stands a four-storied building with brick ends and a wooden 
front, clapboarded and painted brown, developed from a quaint store 
of three stories, and used for business, as it always has been. In 
1771 Joseph Dowse sold this estate to N. Dowse, who claimed £600. 
(352) for loss, 1775, and sold (1781) houses burned to Jos. Lynde. 
He sold (1783) to Joseph Hurd, one of the prominent local traders, 
who sold (1817) to Skinner & Hurd. For years, while the Square 
was a market-place of the old sort, and a great many farmers and 
others from the country brought produce there for sale, this firm 
dealt in it, and in groceries. 

Next east, where now is Warren St., the successor of the narrow, 
crooked Phillip's lane, Leach vaguely sets down " Lemon." There 
was a claim (128) for loss in 1775 of buildings, on account of the 
estate of Joseph Lemmon, and one by Elizabeth (his widow?) 
(129) for personal. By the "Survey" of 1767 "M" Lemmons House 
[was] joyning Dowse' Land." 

From the N. E. corner of Warren St. to Warren Avenue, and 
from these points to the river, and most of the distance to the Navy 
Yard, swept the great fire of Aug. 28, 1835, still (1887) the most 
destructive in the town since that of 1775. On the Square, building 
was begun after the autumn of the next year, and most of the edi- 
fices within these bounds date from 1836, or not long afterwards. 



THE TOWN IN 1775. 121 

At the corner (16, 17) was a plain, narrow brick building of three 
stories with an end on the Square, and beyond it, along Warren St., 
are five three-storied brick, and three two-storied wooden, houses 
reaching to Joiner St. At the centre of 17 stands the building of 
the Bunker Hill Bank, of brick, three stories high, with brownstone 
trimmings and a wooden cornice painted to match, and built to replace 
an earlier edifice, of plain cut granite, with three low stories, and 
arched windows in the second story. At the corner of Chelsea St. 
is a plain brick building of three stories, not as high as the present 
Bank, and beyond it to Joiner St. are several three-storied dwelling- 
houses. EbenT Austin, who died 1723, had, about on the site of 
the Bank, a house (27 ft. front, 16 ft. deep?), and his son Ebenf 
inherited half and bought half (1734). After the death of the latter 
(1757) his heirs took it, and held it (to 1815?). Ebenf also had 
(1723) adjoining a house described as new. "Nat Austin" is put 
near here by Leach. Nathl, pewterer, son of Eben. 2d (claim 203), 
had half a house behind the Town House, and Nath!, goldsmith, " harlf 
a house," barn, and woodhouse (where?). Mary had a dwelling 
bounded by Nat. and widow Welsh (who had a dwelling on Joiner St.). 

18 and 19 are perplexing areas, but it seems safe to name Austins 
among the owners in 1775. John, Jr., lost a dwelling where he 
lived, valued at £500., and Ruth " Harlf a House," valued at £650. 
20, originally the lot of Maj. Sedgwick (see Plan, 1638), passed to 
Ward, Phillips, and Wm. Wyer, a part of whose claim for loss (210) 
seems to have been here ("my house and barn"). In 1784 Dea. 
Timothy Newell bought this lot and another back of it. Part of the 
back land was in the Gorliam estate to 1793, whence it passed to J. 
Thompson, then (1795) to J. W. Langdon, then (1797) to G. Bart- 
lett, then (1801) to A. Eoulstone, who died in 1834, — an example 
of the changes in the ownership of some of these lots. 

Odin (John) and Ballard (Jos.), who claimed (211) for loss in 
1775, seem to have had a narrow lot at this corner, 19 ft. on the 
Square, and along a lane, partly, it may be, on the area of Chambers 
St. (with (?) their " well finished house & in good repair," 9 fireplaces, 
squares of glass 10 X 8). 

On the S. W. .side of that street, at 21, the land was owned by 
Ebenezer Breed, a family in town from early in the last century, 
and losses here are probably in his claim (12). By one account 22 
was bought (1755) by S. Conant, and passed (1814) from his grand- 
son to E. Cook, and was W. M. Edmands's in 1858. By another 
account, Chambers Russell sold here (1761) to Charles Russell, 



122 NEIGHBORHOOD OF THE FERRY. 

who claimed (114) £650. for loss. Sarah Russell claimed (113) 
£491., and must have been in this neighborhood. She stated her 
loss of " A Neet Mansion House " two stories high, giving a long 
description. Leach briefly marks the corner " Russell." During 
the war, ownership of 23 (R. Trumbull and T. Jenner, 1814) is not 
determined by the writer. 24 appears to have been sold by Wm. 
Stanton to R. Trumbull in 1779. Some of the following-named 
losses may have been here. These areas (19 to 22) are occupied on 
the Square by three-storied buildings, all used for business, and of 
brick, except at 19, where the fronts are of cut granite. 

On the ferry wharf {south of lower left corner of Plan I.) Richard 
Trumbull seems to have occupied a shop belonging to the town (G. 
and E., 956). He had a claim (2) for loss on buildings ("wife's 
house"?) in 1775; but as his claim for personal estate was small he 
apparently had removed most of his goods. Close by, Dea. Michael 
Brigden, who died in 1767, had a house (bought by his father in 
1700), and an interest in a wharf (from 1733). For his estate claim 
(1) was made for a loss, £525., on real estate, but none on personal, 
a charge of £7. 10s. for cartage indicating that the latter was re- 
moved. His heirs reported a large house, wharf, barns, fences, etc., 
at £733. 6. 8. "Bunker's Wharff" was opposite, according to the 
Survey of 1767. (See 35.) The land, that seems to have been held 
by his family until 1829, has long been used for wharfage. Timothy 
Brigden (235) had a "shop and barn" near by. Wm. Manning's 
WIFE (227) claimed, he (a ferryman) reporting two dwellings "be- 
longing to me and wife." Thos. Goodavin had a small interest in 
the ferry estate (divided, 1786), and a claim (7), as also had Benj. 
(280), the latter having (where?) 2 barns and 2 "shay" houses, 
etc. Near by, John Larkin (4) had "loss wharf, etc." (G. and 
E., 601), "^ warehouse and wharf," £10., by his statement, with 
£99. 12. 8 personal (£65. 19. 10 in claim). Martha, widow of Eben! 
King, seems to have had two shops, a barn, wharf, etc. near the ferry, 
about which she made a statement. Thomas Larkin had a claim 
(3), as also had Sam. Larkin (6), "hous and back shop, barn and 
shayhous " (?) ; the site of a house here he seems to have disposed of 
to his son (1776). The areas of all these estates have long been used 
for business purposes. Also near and north of the ferry were losses 
by Mart Cutter, also Wm. Conant (214) "house and store," and 
at least part of a large one by John Stanton (216), he describing 
" 1 large dwelling house near the ferry with other buildings adjoining 
40 foot on the main street 96 feet on y' other," £666. 13. 4; also "a 



THE TOWN IN 1775. 123 

large Home in Wappen cost me £333. 6. 8." It may be added that 
the whole area from the old ferry eastward to the Navy Yard and 
northward to Chelsea St. will probably soon be occupied by the 
Fitchburg R. R. Co. (See Stanton, p. 128.) 

Hon. Thomas Russell, son of Judge James (who outlived him 
two years), a leading merchant in his time, had a large claim (5) for 
loss in 1775 of £1,750. on real, and £516. 2. 4d. on personal estate. 
Bought (1764) of D. Russell's heirs (for £600., deed 61, p. 612) and 
property long in the family, he had a wharf, land, and flats, extend- 
ing from Main St., at 25, S. W. to Charles River. On the first 
were two warehouses, 60 X 20 and 40 X 20, and there was " a large 
and Costly dwelling House " that he valued at £1,333. 6. 8. After 
the war he built a brick house (p. 88) on the area of Water St., 
between the present two bridges, but did not occupy it before his 
death (1796). The Survey of 1767 states that it was 44§ feet "from 
Cheevers N: W: Corner to the Corner of Russell's House" (p. 125). 

At 26 A, extending nearly to the avenue to Warren Bridge (as 
that is marked on Plan I.), and then running 100 ft. southward to 
the river, was an estate where lived John Codman, sea-captain, poi- 
soned at home by his slaves in 1755. Their trial, described by Mr. 
Goodell (see p. 280 herein), was among the most notable events of 
its kind in the Colonial history of the town. John (his son) claimed 
(391) £1,277. for losses (mansion, wharf, " wherehouse," etc.). At 
26 B was an adjoining lot with a house that he bought (1771), and 
sold (1793) to Thos. Russell. D. Lawrence owned at 27; lot A he 
sold to R. Devens, B to Eben. Breed (both 1750), and in their 
claims (8 and 12) losses here are probably represented. 

Joseph Hopkins, "waterman," bought (1725) the corner estate 
fronting the Square, and his son Joseph inherited part and bought 
his mother's interest. He, described as a "hatter," etc., had estates 
on Harvard St. (44 F, G, H), and claimed (9) for losses. He is 
said to have been married six times within 27^ years. 

Almost corresponding with the area of the avenue to Warren 
Bridge was the Cary estate. Samuel, "ship-chandler," bought (1717) 
a house, malt-house, and dock, that he left (1741) to his sons, Nath! 
and Richard, and the former sold (1749) his part to the latter. By 
that time there appear to have been two warehouses and a still-house. 
Richard, who died in 1790 (?), claimed little on personal estate, 
but he valued at £600. "some part" of his loss on a dwelling-house 
with brick ends and four rooms on a floor, with a small shop at 
one end, an outkitchen, and cistern, and at £900. a still-house 



124 SQUARE; SOUTH SIDE. 

almost new, with a brick wall and two stills, a large wharf, and 
double warehouse. 

Adjoining the Gary property was a lot, 28, originally held by Thos. 
Graves, the Cromwellian Admiral (60 in Book of Possessions), that 
passed to the Eussells and was long held by them, and finally by the 
Hon. James Russell, who had children, and who, like others of his 
family, owned a good deal of land in town, chiefly outside the Neck. 
His land here, reaching (perhaps 200 ft.) from the Square to the river, 
seems to have been occupied by a warehouse and wharf, as well as 
by his "large mansion," 50 ft. front, that he valued at £1,333. 6. 8. 
His claim (11), one of the largest, was for the total amount of 
£2,501. 2s. As only £199, is for personal property, and as £7. 10 
is added for cartage, much may have been removed. His list in- 
cludes a considerable amount of furniture, hangings for two rooms, 
silk bed canopies, etc., but no books, pictures, or mahogany. 

Judge Russell bought (1759, 1783) some of the back laud of 29, 
the front land of which was a garden before an oblong house, with 
its end towards the Square, standing on 30 previous to the war. In 
this house lived two families, with a front door in common on the 
east side, between which and the garden was a passageway 6 ft. wide 
paved with flat stones. (See deeds 167, p. 246 for these particulars.) 
In the N. end (next the Square) was Capt, .Josiah Harris, who 
claimed "hous and workhouses" (166), and in the other was Mrs. 
Parker. The widow Parker claimed (155) £80. Josiah Harris, 
Jr., who had an interest in two lots hereabouts, claimed (167) for 
loss of £200. on buildings, " half of a house," and a trifling amount 
on personal ; and John Larkin (Dea. 1st ch.), who bought here in 
1759, claimed (168) £425. 10. 4d. for loss on real estate. He owned 
other property and seems to have removed most of his personal effects. 
Matthew Clark, "boat builder," the year before the war bought 
part of a house and a narrow lot reaching to the water, and claimed 
on it (165) as well as for personal, including five boats. He and 
Capt. Harris seem to have removed only a moderate part of their 
personal property. After the war, on the garden ground already 
mentioned arose John Harris's house (45^ X 41 ft.) of wood, plain, 
and three stories high ; in its later years an ordinary public house. 
At 30 was his store, a similar but smaller building used for mechani- 
cal and other business. The two, together with the Russell mansion, 
were in poor enough condition when pulled down to give place for 
the "Waverley House," a very large brick hotel erected (1866-67) 
by Moses A. Dow, extending from Frout St. by the Square to Jenner 



THE TOWN IN 1775. 125 

St., and much larger, indeed, than any other public or private structure 
ever on the peninsula, except, perhaps, the Hoosac Elevator. Abut- 
ting 30, westward, was the estate of John Austin (60, Plan II.). 

From 170 to 200 ft. east of Joiner St. was a dock crossed by a 
swing-bridge, broadening into a basin, and ending in small divisions 
that extended to the present Chelsea St., and almost to its junction 
with Henley St. At or near the head was a wharf, east of 32, sold 
(1723-24) by B. Green to S. Trumbull, from whom it passed (1761) 
to John Ivory, and (1769) to Sam. Henley, whose loss here, "a 
large Distillhouse," ? helped to swell his claim (109). James Trum- 
bull, son of S., seems to have had property hereabouts, helping to 
swell his claim (243). In the neighborhood — rather an unsavory 
one — there were two or three distilleries and a tanyard, that must 
have made it peculiarly inflammable. 

Thomas and Mary Welch, who had a claim, dwelling, stable 
72 X 22, and shop? (207), sold (1786) a house and wharf, at or 
about 34, to J. Cordis, bounded S. W. 46 ft. on Joiner St., S. E. 
159 ft. on D. Cheever, and N. W. 80 ft. on land of heirs of Theo. 
Ivory, who bought (1703) of Maj. D. Davison, bounded W. or S. W. 
also on Joiner St., which might be at or near 33. 

At or about 35 was a lot 93 ft. S. W. on Joiner St., N. W. 168 ft. 
on T. and W. Welch, and N. E. 142 ft. on dock, that (1770) came 
into the hands of David Cheever, who claimed (110) for loss in 
1775 of £2,176. on real, — here a still-house, cooper's shop, etc., — but 
only £86. on personal estate. He had a large house, four rooms on a 
" Flower," 3 " stare "cases, 6 chambers, 3 upper chambers, etc. (See 
25.) This lot is "where the distillery stood in 1775 " (G. and E., 241). 

Richard Cary appears to have had an estate east of 36, but his 
chief property seems to have been at 27. 

On the S. E. was a J. Codman estate, that the writer has not deter- 
mined. On this street no estates are even alluded to by Leach. 
John Codman claimed (391) £1,277. (G. and E., p. 225, says £217.); 
but his chief estate seems to have been at 26. D. Lawrence is re- 
ferred to here before the Revolution. There were four Daniels, and 
the writer thinks that he can omit this puzzle. 

Also in the neighborhood of the dock appear to have been the 
losses of Joseph Johnson (230), a large house and warehouse; 
Battery Powers (231), pot-house, kiln-house, and clay-mill ; Jesse 
Harding (43), the children of E. Cheever (192) (l a dwelling?), 
and of a dwelling and shed reported by John Edmauds. 



126 WATER STREET. 

In 1761 Moses Gill,. Lt.-Gov. of Mass., held 38 and 39, and John 
Gill 37 (apparently derived from Lt.-Col. Michael Gill, who came to 
town 1696?), and sold not long after the Revolution. Moses Gill 
claimed (124) £400. for loss on real only, — a large mansion of three 
" tinniments," near the ferry, that he valued at £591. 7. 7. In regard 
to the areas 40 and 41 (and to 17, 18), the writer can only add that 
the intricacies of transfers may be passed by stating that John Austin 
(31) seems to have been at or near the corner of Chelsea St.; that 
on the lower end of the present "Warren St. seem to have been 
Nath. Austin (see 17), goldsmith (240) ; Ruth (242), widow of Capt. 
Thos. Austin ; Mrs. Best (a house) and Powers (290) ; Jas. Call, 
£250. on real (224) ; and near by, Wm. Leathers, dwelling and barn 
(249), and "\Vm. Leathers, Jr. (250), house, shop, barn, " horsel and 
shope goods." 

Northeastward from the way to the ferry (to the old bridge) a 
" new street " was laid out, now Water St., running parallel to the 
river and leading to the present gate of the Navy Yard. Leach, who 
calls it "about 1600 feet long," gives family, but not other, names of 
abutters, indicated below by italics. The losses here were : — 

Northerly side, at a lane 10 ft. wide, now Chambers St. 

GUI, about 160 ft. front, mentioned at 37 and 38 (the only Gills), 

Dock, 22 ft.; highway, 22 ft.; to this, S. side, were: — 

Austin (which?) at 42, then Gooding. Edward Goodwin (282), 
wharf between ferry and Lemon's, also a house, a barn, and three 
shops. — Brazier, 15 ft. Nathan Dexter (house, barn, and wharf 
near the causeway ?) and Brazer, a house (91), £200. on buildings. — 
Capen, 24 ft. Wm. (272) £225., do. (he estimated a house and shop 
at £2,0U.). — Hardincf, 42 ft. Estate of Thos. (279) £466., house, 
barn, and wharf. — Solei/ 75 ft. Dorcas (274), widow of John, £220., 
dwelling, tallow-house, warehouse, and stable " on my wharf," and their 
son John (275), £500., also on huMings. — White, 40 ft. (who?). 

N. side of the " new street," beyond the above dock, etc. 

Chapman, 50 ft. (Jemima (302), a house 32 X 16 in good repair?.) 
— Capen, 30 ft. Sarah (273), widow of James, £100. "a dwelling 
hous." — Roney, 40 ft. Joanna Euney (304), £100. on buildings. — 
Hopping, 28 ft. Estate of Wm. (183 or 375 ?), buildings (dwelling 
and bakehouse, or may be at 73 ?). 

Opposite the last four. Stone, 144 ft. Elias (303) £100., dwelling, 
warehouse, cooper's shop, wharf, etc. 

Passage 14 ft., and dock 39 ft. wide. 



i 



THE TOWN IN 1775. 127 

lEller (?), 36 it. — Ford, 40 ft. Wm. (30), buildings (he valued 
two houses at £4,400., old tenor, and the lot still burned over in 1787). 

Dock, 89 ft., and road 18^? ft. Opposite, Harris, 89 ft. John 
(120), £893., wharf?, etc., including other losses. (His estimate on 
real was, a " Dubbell " House ; a house ; a barn 20 X 30 ; three-story 
warehouse, 18 X 40, 2 do., 14 X 40; mill; two work-houses, 18 X 40, 
and one 20X30; a "Cill" house, 24X30, and cooper's shop, 14 
X 16). Beyond the road, Henley, 70 ft. (part of claim of Samuel 
(109). Then another road, 16^ ft.? 

N. side, Rhodes, 56 ft. Jacob & Son, the only Rhodes (284), 
£455., ou buildings. (Their whole claim (see no. 102) included § of 
a house and barn ; a house ; a house and barn ; a workhouse ; a 
"fraim" of a vessel, 170 tons; and a large amount of timber.) Op- 
posite them was Breed, 56 ft. Fosdich, 99 ft. James (86), £350., 
on buildings (the only like Fosdick claim, but he reported a dwelling 
"just without the Neck," and " whovers," £150.). — Harris, 49 ft. 
(which "^y— Phillips, 82 ft. (which "^y — Orr, 45 ft. Elizabeth (268), 
£100. ou buildings. A Road next. Munro, 104 ft. David (208), 
£293. on buildings. (He valued a dwelling, barn, workhouse and 
utensils, large shop, and damage to land, at £425.) 

Eastward, N. side, to the corner of Henley St. 

Lemon, 63 ft. Estate of Joseph (128), plan, no. 16. — Foye, 175 ft. 
John (266), £350., who lost a dwelling, 4 elm-trees, new fences, and 
furniture, including " mohigane," to an unusual amount. He added, 
" By the loss of the within Housel fourniture was by Serveing the 
Countrey In taking the Small Pox out of Cambridge at the time that 
Part of the Army was there." Signed Charlestown, June 18, 1775. 
— Newell, 92 ft. Mary (44), widow of David, lost ^ of a house, a 
"hole" house, and a barn (here, or 78). — Brown. NATHf- (47) 
£1,180., lost a large house with 18 rooms, besides bedrooms, "well 
finished from top to bottom," also £560. in shipping. Eliz. Moor, 
widow, lost furniture, £14. 19. 8, at the house of N. B., innholder. 

At the easterly part of Water St. there appear to have been, in 
addition, Josiah Austin (241), between Water and Henley sts. ; Jo- 
seph Breed (283), a house (both for £60.) ; also (?) Lydia Hood 
(22), part of a house; and Andrew Newell (301), \ a house, a 
barn, cooper-shop, store, etc Martha (widow of Andrew ?) stated loss 
of her house and " Houselstuff " at £750. (end of Joiner Street ?). 

Near the Battery appear to have arisen the claims of NATH^ Cart 
(267) and of Thos. Mardlen (269), a large dwelling, sheds, etc., 
and part of that of Nath? Dowse (352). Towards the Point also 



128 HENLEY STREET. 

appear to have been those of Rebecca Sprague (305) and (?) 
David Netvell (262), a dwelling and a barn. 

Turning at this, the easterly, end of the town, and entering Henley 
St., running at an acute angle from Water St. west to Main St. (at 10, 
Plan I.), we first pass Brown, Newell, and Foye, already mentioned, 
and reach famUy names noted by Leach, as follows, given in italics: — 

Stanton, 90 ft. front. John (216, see p. 123). John Fenton (92) 
claimed £802. for losses. — Waters- Abraham (264), £110. (small 
house, etc., 33 X 123). — Johnson (both sides of the street). Eleazer 
and Katy (200), £300. (house, and old warehouse?). — Foster (both 
sides). The estate of Isaac (123), ^ a house (see also 11, Plan I). 
Thomas (both sides). The only claims in this name seem to be (370) 
and (396) for personal losses. 

Highway, 100 ft., and then on the south side of Henley St., — 

Henley. Part of Samuel's estate (109). — Miller and Town. Rich- 
ard Miller (107), £334. on Sds. (he had a dwelling, barn, and work- 
house, that he valued £256.). — Jeniiings. Benj. (423), £55. total. 
From his house the provincial forces took sundries belonging to Eliz. 
Bryant (385), Oliver Frost (386), and Sarah Hicks (387).— Whitte- 
more. Josiah (126), £200., on buildings (there was a cellar here, 
1779). He had a house, woodhouse, and barn, that he valued at 
£1,500. Here Geo. Bartlett left and lost personal valued £144. 10. 

Highway 120 ft., being the open space at the intersection with "War- 
ren St. ; on the N. side (opposite the last four). 

Piles. Katharine (257), widow of John, £266. (by her account 
one new double house and one old, £2,000. old tenor ; valuation here, 
£45., in 1786?). — Penny'' s Kiln. Jonathan Penny &, Co. (226?), a 
kilnhouse and shed, workhouse, and claymill. A narrow highway, and 
then Penny. "Penny's house" (73), valued at £60. — Another 
highway, and then Bodge, of which name the writer has nothing to 
note.— Teal, 23 ft.? William (225) £200. for buildings (he valued 
a double dwelling-house £220., and had a ferry-boat). No man^s land, 
35 ft. ? — Wait, 42 ft. ? Samuel (125) £538., on lands, buildings, etc. 
(He reported a dwelling, barn, and slaughter-house at £420.) 

Across the highway (Warren St.) are S. Henley (10, Plan I.) and 

60, in. 

Close by, in or near Joiner St., seem to have been Ann Welch and 
sister (238), who lost a dwelling that they valued £133. 6. 8., and 
Widow Elisabeth (Austin) Johnson (213), a house (£200.), destroyed 
" by the minterial Butchers." 



THE TOWN IN 1775. 129 

Plan II. S. E. slope of Town hill to Charles river, 
A large piece of land between Harvard St. and Bow St., and S. of 
the double dotted line north of 44, was owned by Capt. or Maj. Thos. 
Jenner, a business man (distiller, etc.,) and a large owner and dealer in 
real estate, who died in 176o. Most of this piece was bought by him 
in 1729. The only plan in the whole block, N. to Arrow St., seen by 
the writer, is one of his "orchard" (1767) by Leach (deeds 68, p. 73) 
with angles made to fit a folio page rather than the land, for it can 
only be made to fit there by altering them (yet using the same figures) 
as in Plan II. It is a curiously crooked lot reaching from street to 
street. Sam. Conant, a baker, acquired a considerable amount of the 
land, buying of Jenner (1760) B and D, and through J. Hopkins 
(1759) C, and of Jenner's executrix (1768) the portion of the large 
(1729) lot A to A. Conant held the latter and sold (1798) a large 
strip across the northerly part (and from street to street) to M. Bridge, 
who also acquired more land S. of this. Sam. Larkin bought E (1757). 
Joseph Hopkins (see Plan I., 27) bought (1759) G, besides 26 ft. front, 
F, that he bought (1759) of Larkin, and subsequently a small strip, H. 
The frontages of these three on Harvard St. are shown by their initials 
in brackets. D. Goodwin bought (1768) the part K, on Bow St., and 
Jenner sold (1760) the lot L to T. Mason. The end lot, I, appears to 
have been where Sam., son of the Capt., lived in 1771. Claims for 
losses in 1775 were made by S. Conant (215), who had a dwelling, 
large barn, and two chaise-houses (also a dwelling, bakehouse, and 
bolting-mills. See also 48) ; Sam. Larkin (included in 6), Jos. Hop- 
kins (in 9), Sam. Jenner (150), a house, and D. Goodwin (in 148). 
On the corner lot, I, there has been (perhaps 40 years) a three-storied 
brick building, having on the curve a granite front with pilasters, the 
whole used for business. At H is a narrow, three-storied brick house 
with a swell front. At E is a three-storied brick house with a broad 
front, and a porch with wooden pillars, towards the street. It was 
built early in the century by Matthew Bridge, who came from Lexing- 
ton (1785), and who left it (1814) to his daughter Sally, Mrs. Seth 
Knowles. After her, Gov. Edward Everett occupied it (1836-40), 
then Wm. Carlton, who owned it about thirty years, and since, J. W. 
Trull, and F. Childs. The southerly part of the lot, meanwhile, has 
been open ground, attached, and shaded by trees. At A B C was 
the large home estate of Mr. Bridge, long occupied by his daughter 
Alice, Mrs. Baker, and also one of the three handsomest old places in 
the lower part of the town. The ground, several feet higher than the 
street, was shaded by a few large trees, and most of it was covered by 

9 



130 HARVARD, BOW, ARROW STREETS. 

grass, or a belt of flower-beds before the bouse — a half-square one of 
wood, with the front and a porch towards the Square. The interior 
was well finished in the style prevalent nearly a century ago. On a 
large part of the site there now are a court, and eight three-storied 
brick houses built by Moses A. Dow. 

The heirs of Abraham Snow inherited (1772) the estate 45 that he 
had owned for about 2o years, and his son Isaac appears to have held 
until the sheriff intervened (1790). Claim (151) was made for the 
estate of Abraham. Harris and Bates (292) claimed in the estate 
of his widow. "Wooden houses erected here, and some vacant land, 
long in bad order, were (30?) years ago succeeded by three swell- 
front, three-storied, brick houses on Harvard St., and a plain-fronted 
brick house on Arrow St., and (about 1865 ?) on the southern part 
(E. Welch's) Moses A. Dow built the large three-storied brick house 
(with a garden at the side) in which he lived, and died (1886). 

Dr. Isaac Rand bought (1741) of John Newell a large lot (on 
Bow, Arrow, and Harvard), and appears to have left (1790) the part 
46 to his daughter Margaret, wife of Nath! Austin. A portion of Dr. 
Rand's large claim (1 1 7) probably arose here. 

James Brasier (141) appears to have bought (1761) from the 
estate of E. Rand, the lot 47, and to have sold it in 1787. (He valued 
a dwelling in C. at £163. 6. 8.) Somewhere near here John Nuting 
(157) appears to have had his loss on buildings. He valued ^ a dwell- 
ing, "kitching at the back sid," £100. 

John Bateman seems to have bought 48 (1744) with a house, and 
S. CoNANT to have obtained it (1768), and loss here would be in the 
claim (215) of the latter. 

D. GooDAViN (148) appears to have had 49, and to have sold it in 
1787. Edw. Powers seems to have held 50 between 1771 and 1784, 
and to have claimed (164) for loss in 1775. He had a house, barn, and 
shop, that he valued at £700. The lot passed to T. Harris (1787?) 
and was levied on by Woodward (1811) while (1811) Skinner & Hurd 
also levied on Harris on a small lot eastward. Bradisu and Good- 
win (285) appear to have had a small loss hereabouts. 

Tlie small block on Middlegatc, Boio, and Arrow Streets. 

Mary Furz, widow of Hugh, who bought in 1741, claimed (153) 
for loss of personal but on no real, in 1775, and was at 51. Daniel 
Waters (152) who bought (1766) of heirs of Adam Waters lot 52, 
had two dwellings that he valued at £600. He sold in, or after, 1790. 
In 1790, Jas. Frothingham bought 53 (on three streets). Of it, A 
was bought (1756) by Jas. Bradish (152), B by him (1755), and C 



THE TOWN IN 1775. 131 

(earlier, 1736?). He lost altogether 3 houses, 3 barns, and a black- 
smith shop. J AS,, Ju., had a small claim (133) on personal. 

On the westerly side of Bow St., (ut the upper part of the Plan) were 
(?) John Goodwin (14o) with a small house and shop ; John Rand 
(14G), and the estate of Thos. Rand (135). Joseph Lynde (127), 
who owned in several places, had land at or near the end of Washing- 
ton St. The Badger family had owned land at 54 reaching to the 
water, but on the street claims for loss on buildings were made by 
David Edmands, Jr. (139), on dwelling, and Richard Trow (140) 
end of a house. Joseph Lewis had owned 55, and Mary Leavis (IGO) 
and Sarah Lawrence (1o8) ^ dwelling, heirs, claimed for loss on 
buildings. Somewhere in this region Frances Lee, widow, claimed 
(159) for loss of a house bought in 17G6, etc. 

James Brasier, who bought 56 in 1761, claimed (141) for loss (see 
No. 47), and Wm. Hunnewell, who bought 57 in 1750, claimed (163) 
for loss of a dwelling, four rooms on a lloor, and outbuildings. (Wil- 
liam, the writer's grandfather, lived three miles away. See p. 86.) 
In regard to block 58 there is difficulty in naming the claimants. Mary 
Hutchinson, Mrs. Tuck, and W. Abrahams owned here not long before 
the war. Nathaniel Rand, ferryman, who had a loss (143) bought 
(1765) about midway in the block, and Tiiaddeus Mason (115) 
bought (1756) at the corner of the present Mason St. After the war 
the intricate operations of members of the Harris family extended to 
this area, as they did in several parts of its vicinity. (See p. xiv.) 

A great deal of block 53 belonged to T. Jenner (see 44), whose 
heirs sold (1771) a large, irregular lot. A, that went into the estate of 
D. Goodwin. Richard Devens (8) and David Wait (19, see Plan L, 6) 
also owned here. The land extending to the water, before the war ap- 
pears to have been occupied by wharves, a distillery, and their attend- 
ant business, and to have comprised the original lots of Johnson and 
Brigden (see Plan, 1638). The corner, B, passed to T. Harris, D. 
Austin (1795), and Isaac Warren, in whose estate it remained from 
1802 to 1858. On it stood his house, similar to that of Mrs. Baker 
(44, A), and the two, personally well known to the writer, were the 
best of the older houses in this part of the town. The ground at B is 
now occupied by a three-storied brick building, and on the former 
garden stand two three-storied, swell-front, brick houses, years ago 
occupied by Geo. W. Warren and Col. T. Upham. 

At 60 was another Austin estate, held by John some years before 
the war, and (?) mortgaged by him in 1776. In 1824, Eben! lived 
here, and for considerable time later, " in a one and a half story, yellow 



132 MAIN, NEAR HENLEY, STREET. 

[wooden] house " (G. and E.), that was removed to give place to the 
billiard-room of the Waverley House. Lot 30, Plan I., adjoins, in 
the Square. 

From the earliest years (see Plan, 1638), Bow St. was lined by 
dwellings, at first scattered, and for many years closely placed. Be- 
tween Washington St. and the Square have lived many well-known 
families. Among them were Henry Jacques (in a wooden house at 
55, now much altered) ; Mr. Goodrich (56, do.) ; Thos. O. Holden (two- 
storied brick house at 57) ; T. Harris (in a three-storied older brick 
house at 58) ; Joseph Hunnewell, and W. W. Whieldon (48, two do.) ; 
Thos. Marshall (in a three-storied wooden house at K) ; Gilman Colla- 
more (in an old three-storied brick house at 50) ; besides others men- 
tioned at 59. The street has, however, changed very much within 
recent years, and the back land, westward, is covered with railroad 
tracks and buildings belonging to the Eastern (B. and M.) Co. 

Plan III., heginnmg at the N. E. corner of Main and Henley Sts. 

The estate here (60*) has long been made prominent by a brick 
building, perhaps the largest of its date, and one of the oldest on the 
peninsula. Three stories high, with low, arched windows, and painted 
light gray relieved by red on the caps, bands, and cornice, it is still in 
very good order, and used, as chiefly from the first, for business. In 
the northerly end of the second story was the Union Library (1821-42), 
a sort of small Athenteum owned by shareholders (see p. 100). Here 
lived John and Abigail Stevens, the latter of whom claimed (122) 
£1,504. for losses on buildings, etc., and £75. personal property. In 
1794 Caleb Swan, merchant, bought the estate (on which there seems 
then to have been a house), and (deed 134, p. 489) sold it (1800) for 
$6,000. to Josei^h Hurd, with the brick store thereon, which for many 
years has been held by his family. Ann Bradish, close by here, re- 
ported her loss of ^ a house, and a large quantity of furniture, as did 
Alice, widow of Benj. Kettell. 

The next estate (61) " was the homestead of Richard Foster, 
Esq.," who had a large mansion. His Heirs claimed (123) as already 
mentioned (pi. 10, 11). As farther described by deed (107, p. 480), 
the estate was sold to Caleb Swan (1792) together with a house "built 
since his [F.'s] decease." In 1810 Mr. Swan sold to John Skinner 
(deed 190, p. 198) who lived here nearly forty years, and who was for 
some time a prominent local business man (see pi. 15). The Swans 
were an important family, who ultimately went to New York. Benja- 
min Lincoln was one of the noblest business men of any family that 



THE TOWN IN 1775. 133 

has lived in the town. Tall, white-haired, dignified, he was a model 
of courtesy as well as of Christian character, in which he ■was not 
surpassed by any one prominent in the town for years after the 
rebuilding, while in wealth he far surpassed perhaps every* other. 
The old house is standing, a wooden one, facing, and close on, the 
sidewalk, three stories high (the upper one of them low), clapboarded, 
topped by a cornice with modillions, but in place of its original parlors 
having shops on the lower floor. 

Adjoining is (62) a four-storied, recent, wooden building, also with 
stores on the lower floor. On its site John White, who claimed (198) 
for loss in 1775, owned a house. He has been mentioned under (10). 
North of it is an estate (63), extending down " the lane to the Train- 
ing field," that was occupied by Capt. Ebenezer Kent, who claimed 
(194) on buildings, etc., burned £739. The building now here is 
similar to the last one described. 

"Winthrop St. leads across the old Back, now Warren, St., to the 
Training field (a short distance to the right of Plan III.). On this 
part of Bach St., appear to have been Lydia Boylston (196), 
daughter of Richard (d. 1752), who had the " old part of his house ; " 
a portion of the loss of Jon. Bradish (estate of? 295); and (?) 
John Carter (20G) a house two rooms on a floor, and Hoppin and 
Samson (77). On the East side (?) were Eliz. Reed & Co. (335), 
a dwelling, and (?) three owners numbered 293 and 294. 

A considerable part of the land around the Traininy field was used 
for some sort of farming. Isaiah Edes had a lot of mowing ; there 
was a Dizer pasture ; Peter Edes owned on the northerly side, after- 
wards the site of the Almshouse, and now of Wallace Court, etc. 
Richard Devens had land, and Sam. Henley two lots. Losses here- 
abouts were claimed by Susanna Wallace (248) on the west corner 
of Winthrop and High Sts., who had two houses ; by Benj. Brown 
(247), Jacob Burditt (246), a small dwelling ; and Thos. Harris 
(259), a house, barn, etc. Near the field were Sam. Townsend (254), 
dwelling, barn, etc. ; Wm. Calder (239), dwelling, barn, and shop ; 
and, on a lane to the Point, Moses Peck (256.) The largest loss 
was at the corner of Winthrop and Warren Sts., where there had been 
a distillery " over a hundred years " (G. & E., 1064) owned by Jas. 
Trumbull (1750-83), who had a large claim (243). He lost a man- 
sion house, and other buildings, and is mentioned on p. 125. 

Across the present Winthrop St., and at the corner of Main St., is 
one of the oldest wooden buildings now on it, square, three stories 
high (the upper one of them low), clapboarded, painted a dark olive, 



134 MAIN TO PLEASANT STREET. 

and capped by a cornice with modillions. The estate (64) was bought 
in 1757 (deed 5o, p. 4) for £oG2. 13. 4d. by Nathan Adams, who 
claimed (193) in 1775 for a loss of £970. 10. 4d. on buildings. In 
1783 he sold the land including a Boylston lot (196) for £300. to 
John Larkin. 

At the corner of the present Monument Avenue (opened here in 
18G7) stands another large square wooden house of three stories, 
higher than the j^receding but not quite as old. Externally it is 
plainer ; internally it was handsomely finished. For many years it 
was the well-known residence of John Ilurd, but since his death it has 
been altered, and stores made on the ground floor. To this estate 
(65), as well as to the last three and next one. Leach (1780) gives no 
clue, and its transfers, bounds, and references, like those of 66, are 
somewhat perplexing in the latter part of the last century. This 
seems to have been the Lemmon property, divided (93, p. 379) be- 
tween Dr. Joseph and Mrs. Mary (Lemmon) Lynde, in 1759. He 
valued house and barn, fore street, where he lived, at £533. 6. 8. 
Here seem to have been the shop of Wai. Grubb (228) who lost a 
dwelling, barn, and pump, and that of Isaiah Edes (42) valued by 
him £66. 13. 4. He also lost a house (at 79 ?). Tim? Austin (307) 
had hereabouts (?) a loss on personal. Subsequently the estate here 
seems to have passed to John Larkin. 

On the northerly corner of Monument Avenue is a narrow, three- 
story, brick house, with a store below, built since the Avenue was 
opened, and covering a remnant (66) of an estate now chiefly occupied 
by that street, and traced from John Cofran, who left it in 1836, bought 
(1807) of Mrs. Susanna Nutting (172, p. 469) to whom it was deeded 
(121, p. 250) as the "Lemon lot" (53 ft. 2 in. front) by Joseph 
Cordis (1796) an extensive dealer in real estate for years after 1781, 
mentioned under 109. Here, apparently, occurred some, of the loss 
of Ruth Kettell (191) widow of Dea. Wm. (died, 1767), dwelling, 
bakehouse, store, barn, etc. She, with her children, sold (1788, deed 
102, p. 157), a lot 23 ft. front, with site of a house, to John Larkin, 
and (1790) another lot, 20 ft. front, to Wm., son of the Dea., with the 
house he lived in. William sold (1797) this to Andrew Kettell (129, 
p. 483). In 1767 (Survey) Mr. Lemmons was 53 J ft. from P. Edes 
(lot 84). 

The next two estates (67 and 68) are occupied in front by plain 
three-story brick buildings, with shops on the ground-floor and dwell- 
ings above. These, like quaint old wooden buildings that they replace, 
have long been owned by the family of Andrew Kettell. William 



THE TOWN IN 1775. 135 

and Andrew (324), sons of Ruth (191), had a small personal loss, 
and jiart of her large claim on buikhngs may have originated here. 

Without solving the perplexities in references to the next three 
estates (as to the last three) it may be sufficient to state that they are 
now occupied by not large wooden buildings, old or altered. A deed 
places at 69 T. Call; the estate of Thomas (188) lost a house, 
barn, and shop. Lots 70 and 71 are marked by Leach D. and N. 
Raxd. Deborah, a daughter of Joseph, inherited in 1769, and a 
claim (60) was made for his estate. Nathaniel (185) claimed 
(for a dwelling, shop, workhouse, and barn) ; and Abraham (350) 
for a shop, between this and the next lot, that he left "for the commity 
to prise as they think proper." 

According to Leach, a passage 12 ft. wide was on the site of 
Pleasant St., and north of it was "Newell's house" (72). In 1766 
James Kettell, a tavern-keeper, sold Eliphalet Newell half a 
house, and the latter at his death (1813) had a corresponding piece 
of property. He claimed (184) for a loss of £480. on buildings, 
reporting a dwelling, bakehouse, and large barn on fore street. He 
also claimed for a dwelling and furniture on account of his mother, 
Abigail. The other half seems to have been owned in one of the 
Rand families, and the loss of it to form part of their claims. Here 
now stands a low three-storied wooden building, much altered, origin- 
ally the Warren Tavern, one of the first houses " erected after the 
conflagration. ... Its large sign, which swung from a high post, 
bore on either side a likeness of Gen. Jos. Warren in his Masonic 
insignia as Grand Master. Attached to the house was a large hall, 
called afterwards Warren Hall." (Thos. Hooper, Rec. K. Sol. Lodge, 
p. 77). Here the first Masonic lodge in the town was formed ; here 
Dr. Bartlett delivered an oration (March 14, 1786), the first work 
printed in the town ; and hence went the procession to hear Dr. 
Morse's Eulogy on Geo. Washington. 

At 73 is another old, low, three-storied, and less altered wooden 
house on an estate marked " Hopping " by Leach (1780) ; but that 
Wm. Hoppin appears to have sold (1769) to Capt. John Hancock, 
who claimed (84) for buildings and personal £417., having stated his 
loss of a large dwelling, barn, small buildings, and personal, "valey at" 
£416. 14. 10. Just here, however, the List of Claims, as is unusual, 
follows the estates in order, and the estate of Wm. Hopping (183) 
shows an estimate of £180. on buildings (see Water St.) Widow 
Abigail Newell (296, a small lot of furniture) is said to have been 
next to him on Main St. 



136 MAIN TO THOMPSON STREET. 

The next estate (74), marked " Badger " by Leach, was sold (1767) 
by Stephen to his son, Rev. Stephex, the missionary to the Natick 
Indians (see Bibliography), who claimed (182) for £120. on buildings 
(dwelling and bakehouse in Main St.) but no personal. The existing 
building here, in recent style, is of wood, four stories high, painted 
dark, and used for a store below and a house above. 

According to Leach, " Hutciiinsox " was at 75. By the List of 
Claims, Samuel (181) had a loss of £374. on real, and £114. 3s. on 
personal estate. He stated that the " house that I lived in, 5 rumes 
on the Lore floar," was worth £333. G. 8, and that he had another 
house in Bow St. 

At the corner of Thompson St. (laid out in 1805) is an early three- 
storied wooden house, with its end close upon the street, having now 
stores on its lower floor, and on a former narrow garden or front area. 
Tins (76) was the estate of Hon. Benjamin Thompson, long an es- 
teemed and substantial citizen, and a member of the U. S. House of 
Representatives (1848-52). A portion of the land seems to have 
belonged with the preceding, and a portion to be that marked by 
Leach " S. Rand." Samuel Rand (180) stated a loss of a barn and 
^ a dwelling. 

For some distance beyond this point, on this side of the street, Leach 
gives no clue, nor does he for a greater distance on the opposite, or 
westerly, side to which we turn. 

Beside a lane, at 77, is an estate (part of 106) bought (1773) by 
Capt. Eleazeb Johnson (263) and sold by his executors (1808) to 
Susanna, wife of Capt. Eliphalet Newell, at whose death (1827) the 
building, since altered, now there, was described as a " brick house," 
40 ft. front. It stands close on the street and was two stories high, 
but the southerly half now has three stories. Here have lived Dr. 
Bemis (N. half), Dr. Bancroft, and before him Constantine F. Newell, 
a Greek who took that family name, and was one of the most attractive 
men in the society of the town at his time. 

Across the front of the next estate (78) stands a quaint, white? 
wooden house, two stories high, with a hipped roof, where for many 
years Catharine Carlton lived and had a millinery shop, in which she 
also had a circulating library, both familiarly known. The estate was 
held by W™ Austin (1821-42) who bought of Nancy Harding, whose 
father had it of the heirs of David Neavell, who died in 1770, and 
whose widow, Mary, had a claim (44) in 1775 (here, or in Water St.) 

At the corner of Bow St. is an estate (79, reduced in breadth by 
widening that street), long held by Amos Tufts (deacon in the First 



THE TOWN IN 1775. 137 

Church, 1804-39), and still partly occupied by his three-storied brick 
house, with an end on the street, and a narrow garden in front. He 
bought it in 1796, it having been previously held by Isaiah Edes, a 
part of whose claim (42) for losses in 1775 seems to have been here. 
(See also 65.) He reported a house "apprized when Grandfather 
died," £333. 6. 8, and "laid out on it," £100. Sarah, widow of 
Richard Kettell, lived near this corner, and lost a dwelling (£200). 

On the opposite corner (Main and Harvard) is an estate (80) nearly 
covered by a three-story building with walls of split stone and quoins 
of block stone brought from the Outer Brewster by Gen. Nathaniel 
Austin. He bought that island in 1799, and erected this landmark, 
that may properly be considered a monument of its white-haired 
builder, who was for a long while one of the most striking and fa- 
miliar figures among the townspeople, and who occupied a room here 
for many years. The writer does not know who owned here in 1775. 

Next stands (81, and partly on 82) a low and old three-storied 
wooden house, painted dark, but with a recent shop inserted. The 
land was occupied by Call (C.) and Burns (J,), the latter holding 
(after 1772) part of a house, 10 ft. on Main St., and both having claim 
39 for loss in 1775. Hannah Burn reported ^ a dwelling on Main 
St., and part of a barn, at £106. 13. 4. Hannah, widow of C, had 
a small personal claim (40), but she reported loss of § of a dwelling, 
and a barn. (See 94.) Most of the larger lot adjoining (82) belonged 
to another Caleb Call, a baker (38), who reported a loss of a dwell- 
ing, bakehouse, barn, and store. His administrator sold (1785) 52 ft. 
frontage to Dr. Josiah Bartlett, who also bought (1791) the narrow 
strip on which was the end of a house. In his time he was one of the 
most prominent men of the town, not only professionally, but in 
Masonry, and in public affairs. He delivered several addresses that 
were printed and are now scarce ; the earlier of them, indeed, are very 
rare ; the first has been mentioned (at 72). He died, and this estate 
was sold (1820) to Dr. W. J. Walker, also a well known physician, 
who sold in 1846. His house, of brick, three stories high (the upper 
of them low) stood back from the street, and before it was an area on 
which grew two large trees. Though broad, the house was shallow. 
Since he left it, the area has been covered by a building, with a plain 
brick front, used for business. 

On 83 is a large, three-story, wooden building of considerable age, 
with stores on the ground-floor, occupied for many years, after 1819, 
by Benj. Haines and Geo. "W. Little. The estate, that had belonged 
to Dea. Jon. Kettell, was bought (1764) by Dea. Sheppie Townsend, 



138 MAIN ST., HUKD ESTATES. 

who claimed (37) for loss on real, but not on personal, in 1775, and 
from whom it passed to his son (1791), and from him (1793) to Dr. 
J, Bartlett. (There were a John Townsend, and John, Jr., who had 
small claims (36 and 344) for loss of personal property.) 

The large estate (84) composed of sundry old lots belonged, in part 
at least, to Thomas Fluckek, a royalist, whose property was confis- 
cated by the State ; yet in his name there was a claim (32) of £450. 
loss on buildings, etc. Rebecca Fowle (a daughter) and Elizabeth 
made out a claim for a house and barn. Joseph Hurd bought his 
estates (1785), in which the southerly part of 84 was apparently in- 
cluded. The northerly part appears to have belonged to Peter Edes, 
who claimed (35) £781. loss on buildings, etc., but no personal, and 
who removed to Harvard (G. and E. 520), where he died in 1787. 
On the consolidated estate Mr. Hurd built (about 1795) the three- 
storied wooden house still standing, one of the very best ever on the 
street (see p. 88), and kept a large part of the ground for a lawn and 
garden, both also still (1887) preserved. 

Along the next four numbers on Plan III., Leach's memoranda 
are resumed. First comes (85) "Hurd," 34 ft. front. Benjamin, 
"leather dresser" (G. and E., 531), appears to have owned here for 
(perhaps 20?) years. He owned several estates, and claimed (28) 
£1,695. 7. 8d. on buildings, etc., but only £80. 11. lOd. on personal. 
His account of his losses (on four closely written pages) is the most 
detailed one that we have, and, with Capt. Henley's (10), supplies us 
with the best knowledge we have of a good house in the town before 
the war. His was a brick house, 57 X 20, "with a good Suller under 
the Whole house laid in Lime with Brantra Stones. Three arches 
under three Stacks of Chimneys, also an Arch under a flue oven for 
Ashes." On the lower story (8 ft. 2 in. " high in the Clear "), were a 
kitchen, with fireplace, iron oven, 3 windows (24 lights, 7 X 9), 3 doors 
(6 panels each), and outside door, all well painted ; also " 2 good keep- 
ing rooms," 3 doors in 1 and 2 in the other (6 panels each), 2 windows 
(24 lights, 7X9) in each room, with seats and four-leaved " Shet- 
ters " (3 panels each leaf), fireplaces " with good tiles and a good Con- 
neticut stone before each hearth," closets, and " each Room well painted 
and paper'd ; " also a shop with a large window each side the door (3 
leaves each), these and the door having "78 Squars 8 by 10," shutters, 
seat, etc., all well painted ; an entry from shop to kitchen, and one 
between the two keeping-rooms with a door having "5 Squars of 
Glass above Head." "There was 3 stayer cases leading up my 
second storey " (that 8 ft. 2, clear). Front chamber, 4 windows 



THE TOWN IN 1775, 139 

(24 "Squars," 7 X 9), shutters, doors, and fireplace as below, the whole 
painted Blue. Two other chambers similar, 3 and 2 windows, and two 
small chambers, all painted and j^apered. Two stairs to the third story, 
where there was a chamber 21 feet long ; over it a "cock-loft with a 
pitch Roof," and over other parts of the second story a " Garrett " 
with a " Gambrell roof, hipt'd at the front." All the roofs were double- 
boarded, and shingled. The yard beside the house was paved 10 ft. 
wide, and around the land, up the Hill, was a stone wall 7 ft. high. 
In the yard was a cistern (700 galls.) a pump, and a Breeches-maker's 
shop (12 X 10) plastered, and with 3 windows. Up the hill were a barn 
(25 X 15), and a work-house (30 X 14) with two stories and a cellar. 

An old, quaint house, of wood and brick, that stood here endwise on 
the street and faced a narrow area on which grew a large willow-tree, 
was for many years occupied by his grandson, Dr. J. Stearns Hurd, 
who was long well known in Charlestown society, as also was his ac- 
complished wife. A four-storied apartment-house of brick, with stores 
on the first floor and two metal bay-windows extending through the 
three stories above to the flat roof, has been built (1886-87) over this 
estate by Jos. Gahm. 

86 and 87, marked by Leach "Boylston," 48 ft. front, appear 
to have been held by a family of that name after 1742, and to 
have been inherited (1807) by Thomas from his father, Richard, who 
claimed (27) £774., stating the loss of a mansion, barn, " colehouse," 
and several minor buildings, but little on personal estate. In 1813 
Joseph Hurd bought of Thomas, and sold (1813) a lot (86) to the 
"Washington Hall Association. On it was erected the existing three- 
storied brick building occupied by S. Kidder & Co., and successors, 
druggists, a firm dating from 1804, and one of the very oldest and best 
known in the town. The association (50 shares subscribed by 34 per- 
sons, annual payment $5) had for some time on the 2d floor a reading- 
room, where (the writer has been told) there was a great deal of local 
gossip. A long note about the Hall is in the writer's Bibliography 
(p. 46). At 87 there is now an old, low, three-storied wooden building, 
with shops on the lower floor. 

A similar, but larger, building stands on 88. Somewhere here is 
the 20 ft. front marked by Leach "Austin." Mart, the name of 
the widow of Ebenezer, had a claim (21) for a loss of ^ end of a 
" duble house in fore street," and a blacksmith's shop back of it. She 
sold (1789?) a lot 22 ft. on the street, and 84 or 89 ft. N. W. on R. 
Boylston (G. and E., 30), that seems to fit upon number 87 of the plan. 
The present corner lot, 88, that must have included part of the exist- 



140 MAIN ST.; TOWN HILL. 

ing Henley St., is assigned by Leach to " Foster." Capt. Isaac, 
who died in 1781, held a good deal of real estate, and claimed (24) for 
a mansion, barn, storehouse, and chocolate mill. He seems to have 
had this lot, which was sold (1800) by the heirs of his son Isaac, 
a distinguished physician, who died in 1782, and who had a claim 
(313) of £139 for apothecary's stock left in the house and stable. 

An estate with 17 ft. front, marked by Leach "Edes," must have 
been on the present Henley St. along with a part of 88. Huldah 
Edes, who had a lot with a house that corresponds (89), and that had 
been several years under mortgage, claimed (23) for loss in 1775. 

Dotted lines here on the plan show the site proposed (1780) for the 
meeting-house when the town was rebuilt, and, on the hill, other dotted 
lines show where it was built and stood (1783-1833), while full lines 
show the place of its brick successor (1833-87) described on page 53. 
At 90 is a small lot, for many years occupied by a barn in bad condi- 
tion, but now by two good brick houses built by Jos. Gahm. At the 
corner (on 84) Dea. John Frothingham owned a small barn. The 
outline at 91 shows the form of the old brick town-schoolhouse, re- 
placed (1847-8) by a larger brick edifice extending farther north, and 
of three stories, with granite trimmings. Here, or very near here, 
there appears to have been a schoolhouse from early times, one being 
mentioned in a deed in 1659, and here was probably one of the two 
schoolhouses burned, mentioned (466) among the losses in 1775. 
There is a similar reference to a county jail (1707). (G. and E., 206, 
not in index.) The scarcity of even any allusion to the definite site 
of the public buildings is remarkable ; that of the meeting-house is 
obtained from a private plan, the only authority known to the writer. 

Before 1795 the area 92 appears to have been Town land, some of 
it forming the yard of the county jail. In 1813, Jos. Hurd bought a 
considerable part, now occupied by a two-storied wooden building, old 
and quaint. At the back of the next lot (83) is an old brick building 
of two stories, for many years in poor condition, as also has been the 
rear of 82 and 81. 

On the wedge-shaped block along the other side of the northerly slope 
of the hill, the cross lines should perhaps be put a little farther towards 
Main St. At the point (93) there has been for a long time a small 
single-storied building of wood, used for one kind of business or an- 
other, and now extending northward only to the black line. James 
Bradisii bought this lot of the Town in 1732, and sold it to the Town 
in 1790, and part of his claim (132) for loss in 1775 (of blacksmith 
shop and stock) may have originated here. 



I 



THE TOWN IN 1775. 141 

At 94 a part of a house was bought by John Burn in 1772, while 
the other part remained occupied by the widow Hannah Call who 
had a small loss (40) of personal estate. Call and Burns (39) had 
a claim (81) on Main St., and the § of a house and a barn may have 
been here. 

Caleb Call, son of Thos., had 95, and claim 38 (dwelling, bake- 
house, barn, and store) may also have been in part based here. Here 
stands an old, low, three-storied wooden house, capped by a cornice 
with modillions, and arranged for two families. In the upper half 
lived Thos. B. Wyman, the genealogist. Northward is a small garden 
(partly on 94?), and southward are two two-storied wooden houses 
covering a former garden belonging to the old house. 

Richard Hunnewell's estate covered 96 and 97, the former 
bought in 1738 and the latter in 1744, making a frontage of 114 feet. 
He claimed (137) for a house, shop, stock, and furniture in 1775, 
and sold the land in 1782. Here now stand four three-storied brick 
houses with swell fronts, and (across the north end) an old, two- 
storied wooden house, with a hipped roof. (The old homestead of 
the writer's grandfather was three miles out of town.) 

Ephraim Osburn appears to have bought 98 in 1746, and to have 
held it at the Revolution. He died (in 1783?) and his widow sold 
(1783) to Dea. David Goodwin. Claim (154) was made for the 
estate of Eph. Osbourn. John Center bought lot 99 in 1726, and 
M. Bridge (who came to town in 1785) sold it in 1793. The lot 
100 reaching to Arrow St. belonged to B. Davis (in 1725?) and as 
a garden was sold (1765) by him to Seth Sweetser, who lost a 
dwelling and claimed (219), and whose heirs sold by 1795. Some 
part here seems to have passed to James Davis (son of B.), whose 
widow Sarah lost half a dwelling and claimed (156). On the hill 
at the corner of Arrow St. (parts of 99 and 100) was a garden, and, 
facing it, an old, white, wooden house, which, like the garden, was 
small but quaint and well kept. These three lots (98, 99, 100) are 
now occupied by three brick houses, three stories high, forming part 
of Moses A. Dow's large estate between here and Warren Avenue. 

At the north end of the block betiveen Prescott St. and Bow {now 
Devens) St., 101 was bought (1701) by Stephen Kidder, and by 
his grandson John sold (1803) to J. C. Edmands. John inherited 
in 1770, and claimed (136) for a loss of a shop and end of a house. 

Jacob Rhodes had been taxed on property in town for many years 
before the Revolution. He and his son Jacob were shipwrights (see 
p. 127) ; the latter sold (1803) estate (102) to J. C. Edmands (57^ ft. 



142 PRESCOTT AND BOW STS. 

on Middlegate St., and 49| ft. on Bow St.). Here may have been 
a dwelling on which was part of their loss (284), one of half a dozen 
buildings that they owned. 

On this Edmands property are now a three-storied brick house (the 
upper story low), old, but painted and in good order, standing at the 
corner, and southward, a three-storied, recent, wooden house, painted 
a dark color. 

On 103 are now two similar houses. Richard Devens, who died in 
1807, owned here (?) and a large lot between the two streets (100 ft. 
on Bow St.) forming a considerable part of the area (104) now occu- 
pied by the Harvard schoolhouse, a high, three-storied building of red 
brick, with pressed brick facings and granite trimmings, not in one of 
the old defined styles, yet with dignity, picturesqueness, and better 
effect than municipal art sometimes secures. Dedicated Feb. 22, 1872, 
it cost $130,285, and has room for about 800 scholars. (Plans and 
view in School Report, 1872.) At the southerly end of this area 
Nathaniel Phillips bought (17G2-6G) a house and land of the 
heirs of E. Dowse, and claimed (134) for a loss on a dwelling (2 rooms 
on a floor, and 2 chimneys), and a barn 24 X 18. 

On the north side of Bow St. 105 was bought (1756) of Isaac 
Johnson's administratrix by David Newell, whose widow Mary 
claimed (44). She is mentioned (78), and p. 127 (Water St.) Mary 
Wilcott (45), widow, claimed for a house. His heirs sold (178G) to 
Stephen Bruce, husband of his daughter. 106 was sold (1773) by 
Isaac Johnson's heirs to Mercy Wolcut, Walcot, or Willcut, and by 
her (1773) to Capt. Eleazer Johnson, who seems to have held it 
until his death (1807). It was a large p shaped lot reaching to 
Main St., the easterly arm of which formed 77 on this plan. 107 
formed part of a large lot bought on mortgage (1772), with a house, 
by Jonathan Fowle of Providence, and sold to Josiah Bartlett (1795), 
and by him (1795) to Capt. A. McNeil, who for some years dealt 
largely in real estate in the town, although he is said to have lived 
in New York (G. and E. p. 645). He sold (1798) this land (41 ft. 
on Bow St., and 118 ft. deep) to James Frothingham. Jon. Fowle 
claimed (161) for loss of £80. on a small house. On these three lots 
there now are wooden houses, except on the westerly part of 107 
bought to protect St. John's Church, and occupied by its pictur- 
esque wooden chapel. 

On 108, another part of the Fowle lot, stands the church itself, 
described on page 59. 



THE TOWN IN 1775. . 143 

Plan IV. Main St., north of Tliompson St., northeast side. 

The large estate 109, as a part of Katharine Phipps's garden, was 
sold (1752) to Jas. Gardner and others, and at once divided into 
irregular parts, he taking one of them, and D. Wyer and Jos. Rand 
the others. A claim (178) was made for his estate on account of 
losses on buildings of £600., but only £30. for personal. He had val- 
ued a house, barn, and workhouse, at £666, 8. 4. His administrator 
sold (1780) a considerable area to D. Wood, Jr., who traded in land 
in this neighborhood, and soon sold (1780) to Capt. Joseph Cordis, 
formerly a shipmaster and then a merchant. The latter also bought 
(1781) a lot hereabouts of Jos. Frothingham (who had claim 59) and 
(1801) mortgaged the house where he lived, and store, with land 
extending 135 ft. on Main St. and 116 ft. on Back St. Capt. Cordis, 
said Mr. Thos. Hooper, "was among the first in town to engage in 
mercantile pursuits on what was then considered a large scale." His 
house, now standing nearly opposite Union St., is a square, low, three- 
storied, wooden one, in the first story of which shops have been in- 
serted. Capt. Cordis owned land back to High St., and through it 
the street named after him was made in 1799. In the wars between 
France and England he, like others here, suffered badly, and probably 
on this account his death was hastened. From this house to the 
corner of Thompson St. are old brick buildings of three stories, with 
stores below and dwellings above. In the one next Capt. Cordis's, 
S. C. Armstrong had his printing works (1810-11). Next northward 
for many years stood a low two-storied building extending from street 
to street and occupied for a grocery store by two well-known citizens, 
Wm. and Sam. Abbot. On its site is now a three-storied brick build- 
ing, with store below and dwellings above, owned by Mr. Klous. 
Hereabouts, also, stood the distillery of Wm. and David Wyer (1735- 
52) that passed through mortgage to Gov. Jas. Bowdoin, and Isaac 
Rand, with complications it is not here necessary to consider. 

At 110, Anne (Rand), widow of Jo'hn Rayner, left (1774) a house 
valued at £1,500. to her children, who claimed for losses in 1775; 
TnoMAS (172), house, etc.; James (174), furniture (he lived in Dea. 
Cheever's house) ; and Ann (173), ^ a shop. Isaac (255) had an 
interest in the estate. In 1812, Ann, who ultimately inherited all, 
devised to Mary, wife of Geo. Bartlett. Here there is now a two- 
storied wooden building used for business, including for some forty 
years a store for lamps and gas-fixtures kept by L. F. Whitney, F. A. 
Titus, and G. S. Poole. 

Across a narrow alley (now closed) that extended from street to 



144 MAIN ST. ; craft's COENER. 

street is (1887) a large, new, four-storied, wooden building with 
shops on the first floor, and forming (at the black line on the plan) a 
part of the south side of Thompson Square (another Boston " square " 
without a right angle to it). The old estates, however, extended (as 
shown by dotted lines) farther north. In 1702 N. Ileaton bought 
111 and 112, and sold (1723) Jon. Rand, who sold (1725-26) the 
latter to E. Bennett, and he (1740) Jas. Hay. Jas. sold it (1765) 
to his son John, of whose large estate, and claim (74) for two houses, 
bakehouse (2 ovens), " shaise " house, etc., it appears to have formed 
a part. Jon. Rand held 111 until his death (1760), when his heirs 
sold half the house to his son. Rev. Nehemiah, who (?) claimed 
(175) for a mansion with 7 "smokes," a hatter's shop, and barn. 
His widow and administratrix sold (1765) the other part to his son 
Thomas, who claimed (176) for a house, workshop, and barn. Es- 
ther Rand, widow of Jon., another son, claimed (177) for furniture. 

From the first rebuilding in the town until recently, the house that 
stood at the corner, 113, was one of the most notable landmarks in 
the central parts of Charlestown. Its site is now wholly within the 
area of Thompson Square, and a post there bearing an electric light 
may be considered its monument. It was a long, narrow, wooden 
building of two stories, with a gable at the end, and a roof sloping 
towards each street. For many years Mrs. Mercy Boylston lived in 
the southerly end and upstairs, and on the first floor at the other 
end Elias Crafts kept a druggist's store, and hence the place got the 
name of " Crafts' Corner." According to Mr. Cutter (Centennial 
Reminiscences, 1875), and information in the Hay family, the house 
was the first erected at the rebuilding of the town. As was the case 
with 112, this estate belonged to John Hay, and formed part of his 
claim (74). He had it (1763) of his father, who (1724-25) of Jon. 
Rand, who (1723) of N. Heaton, who (1702) of Joseph Phipps. 
In 1802 John Hay left the estate to his son Wm., who died in 1813, 
and his daughter Mercy (Boylston), who lived until 1849. 

The block 109-113 appears to have been chiefly pasture early in 
the 18th century, garden about the middle of it, and at the Revolution 
somewhat closely built upon. Almost every foot of the land is now 
covered by a roof. 

The land to the east and north of Warren St., on Plan IV., ap- 
pears to have been chiefly pasture until about 1800. Cordis St. and 
Pleasant St. were opened through it in 1799, and better access was 
given to the former in 1805 by laying out Thompson St. 

From the existing passage to the Universalist meeting-house to 



THE TOWN IN 1775. 145 

Green St., and along that to High St., and also bounded 164 ft. on 
the latter, was a lot of an acre and a half that John Hay bought 
(1752) of John Phillips, a sea-captain, son of Col. Judge John 
Phillips. It was described as Hay's pasture as late as 1791, when 
he sold Samuel Dexter one acre, the part on Green St. and High 
St., with 96 ft. front on Main St. This became the handsomest, and 
perhaps largest, early post-revolutionary place on the peninsula, and 
is described on p. 93. John Hay owned several lots of real estate, 
and claimed (74) for losses. Of him, Capt. J. Cordis (and others ?), 
Timothy Thompson had acquired after the Revolution, and by 1799, 
land from Cordis St. to 116, buying 114 in 1803, and 115 in 1799, 
both from the Hays. The latter and part of the former were sold 
by his heirs (1874) to the Five Cent Savings Bank. His old and 
low two-storied house with an end on the sti-eet, and a row of little, 
quaint, similar houses fronting the passage to the church, all of them 
painted a dingy white, were pulled down, and the existing bank 
building was erected, one of the largest and the handsomest business 
structures ever in the town. It is of brick, with a front of pale olive 
stone, and has a flat roof with a sharp pitch towards the streets, and 
large dormer windows. The style may perhaps be called eclectic 
Gothic. On the lower floor are three stores ; on the second are the 
rooms of the Savings Bank, the Monument Bank, and Charlestown 
Gas Co. Nowhere else in Boston will there now be found a group 
of three institutions that, in their respective departments of business, 
stand better. In the upper part of the building are the spacious and 
handsome quarters of King Solomon's Lodge. 

The portion of the Hay lands, 116, after being held about thirty 
years by the Stevens family, was used with the part of 117 on Main 
St. for Dexter Row, a block of six three-storied brick houses with 
areas and iron fences, and rather high granite basements in front, 
built 1836 and later, and occupied, 1, successively by S. Varney, N. 
A. Tufts, Mr. Damon, Dr. Bickford, and Dr. Blood; 2, by Hon. 
Benj. Thompson ; 3, by H. P. Fairbanks ; 4, by Daniel White ; 

5, by J. Forster and his son Dr. E. J. Forster until recently; and 

6, by Rev. Geo. E. Ellis, D. D., until 1871. 

David Wood and his son David, Jr., owned a good deal of land 
north of Green St., most of it unimproved. In 1801 Oliver Holden 
bought a tract from the N. W. corner of 118 to Green St., and ex- 
tending up the hill. Wood St. was laid out (1801), and he sold 
(1802) to Jos. Reed the lot between it and the passage way north- 
ward. On the corner of Wood St. is a plain three-storied brick 

10 



146 MAIN ST., GREEN TO UNION ST. 

house, the upper story low, and, formerly, a shop half in the cellar 
at the end towards Main St. It was built before 1815, and in it 
and around it was Lynde's carriage factory, afterwards removed across 
Main St. Two three-storied brick houses, not as old, stand on the 
northerly part. More notable was the part of the lot at the corner 
of Green St. Here, after the war, stood the Indian Chief Tavern 
that had a variety of mortgages on it as well as landlords in it, until 
it was moved to the corner of Miller St. and replaced (1818-19) 
by the brick meeting-house of the Second Congregational Soc, or 
Harvard Church, now standing (1887), and described at page 56. 
David Wood seems to have acquired this estate (1763) from Jas. 
Roberts, who had it (1761) from Hannah (Sartell) Bacorn, who in- 
herited it as a part of a large estate hereabouts belonging to her 
family. On it, and on Green's lane, was a house occupied (1761) by 
widow Margaret Goodwin. There was also a barn from which Ameri- 
cans fired on the left of the British line in the latter part of the battle, 
and which was in consequence destroyed by a party from the 47th and 
Marines. Losses here in 1775 were probably claimed for by David 
Wood (130), who valued a dwelling, barn, 2 shops, and "shayhous," 
at £666. 13. 4 (see p. 149); "fensen stuf," £30. 13. 4; dwelling, 
barn, and "shayhous my son David in," £666. 13. 4; (here?) and 
"one pue in the meatinhous," £64. 5. 8. 

Other parts of the Sartell estate were bought by him (1740, 1753), 
and extended beyond the limits of Plan IV. 

On the westerly side of Main St. is the lot marked 120 that seems 
to have belonged to Eleazer Johnson. Claim 263 is in this name. 
121 seems to have been held by Mrs. Abigail Bradish, inherited from 
her father, Eleazer Johnson (1768), and forming (?) a part of the 
claim (46) of her husband, Jonathan (a house, 3 rooms on a floor, 
lately thoroughly repaired?). This lot extended 157 ft. on the pres- 
ent Union St. The land forming the end of that, at 122, was sold 
(1769) by Abigail Carey to W. Harris, who claimed (49) for loss 
of a large new house, 36 X 21, three stories, and a kitchen 15 X 15, 
two stories; also for a barn, 26 X 18. On 120 and 121 stand three 
brick houses, three stories high, with sloping roofs, that were for 
many years occupied by E, Riddle, Henry Forster, and Dr. H. Lyon. 

John Austin had 123, and Timothy occupied, or owned the prem- 
ises. The former claimed (50) for a dwelling with four rooms on a 
floor. Not long after the war Jacob Forster bought this lot, and for 
many years it was occupied by him or his successors for a large fur- 
niture store, kept in a long, low, three-storied wooden building, 49 ft. 
on Main St., 106 ft. deep, and still here. 



THE TOWN IN 1775. 147 

Dea. John Frothingham bought (1747) of the widow of W. 
Sweetser, lot 124, claimed (29) for loss in 1775, and sold in 1785. 
The lot changed hands often after that, being held by J. Lynde, J. 
Cordis, who sold (1798) J. Sivret, who (1799) to S. Brown. E. 
Larkin sold it (1802) to Artemas Ward, who (1810) to A. Adams, 
and he (1815) to E. Wheeler. On this site is an old, low, three- 
storied wooden house, with its end towards the street, and on a former 
garden a recent wooden building, both now with shops. 

Martha and Eliza Abrahams may have inherited 125 from their 
father Wm., after 1763, and have sold after the war. Elizabeth 
stated a loss of a " yard house " and furniture. Martha had a small 
claim (195) for personal, as had a Ralph (278), and Joanna, a 
widow (306). Richard Boylston, who levied on Wm., brother of M. 
and E. (1774), afterwards held it (1784-1807), and it was inherited 
by his son Wm., who died in 1836. On the S. part stands a two- 
storied brick house, built since his time, and now used for a restaurant. 

Wm. Barber, who lost a house, appears to have mortgaged 126 to 
T. Mason (1765), who came in possession .(1781), and after whom 
Dr. A. R. Thompson bought (abt. 1807) and held or occupied it until 
his death (1866). His garden on a part of 125 was subsequently cov- 
ered by a wooden building one story high, with stores, and his three- 
storied white wooden house — the end of which was on the street, and 
the upper story low — was raised and shops were put under it. He 
was for half a century one of the most familiar and esteemed persons 
in the town ; and for nearly forty years the family physician in tlie 
home where these lines are written. 

The estate 127 on the corner of Austin St. seems to have belonged 
to John Codman, who claimed (391) for a dwelling near Capt. Bar- 
ber's (see 31). A two-storied wooden house with a hipped roof stood 
here from an early date, and was long occupied by Mrs. Draper. At 
present there is a large three-storied wooden building with a high roof, 
and with stores below and dwellings above. By the Survey, 1767, it 
was 93 feet " from Codman's House over to M"' John Hay's Land " 
(lot 116). 

Here and beyond (?) for 226 ft. on the street, Leach (1780) has 
placed a few memoranda that are about as puzzling as helpful. 

Dr. Isaac Rand appears to have owned the land at the opposite 
N. E. corner of Austin St., and to have sold (1745, deeds 46, p. 312) 
lot 129, with a house, to Jas. Hay, who sold (1765) to his son John. 
He left it (1802) to children of Richard Hay, another son, who sold 
(1804) the corner lot to B. Gage (for many years an occupant). Loss 



X 



148 MAIN ST. TO MILLER ST. 

on a house (or two houses ?) here would be estimated in the claim (74) 
of John Hay. Dr. Rand appears to have continued to hold land 
through the war, and lost hereabouts a barn occupied by T. Rayner. 

Back of 129 and 130 was a piece of mowing land mortgaged (1767) 
by Ann to T. Rayner (deeds 66, p. 554). It was N. E. 64 ft. on 
Benj. Rand, 46 on Nich. Hopping ; N. W. 296 on Eleazer Dowse ; 
S. W. 77 on Jos. Lynde; S. E. 306 on Isaac Rand, with a 10 ft. 
passage to the "country road" (see 110). 

Nicholas Hopping (53), whose house in 1767 was, by the Survey, 
53 feet from the corner of Hay's pasture (116), sold lot 130 in 1784. 
D. Wood, Jr., bought (1768) lot 131, 50 ft. front, where, as his claim 
(131) was for fences, etc., there seems to have been no house (but 
perhaps end of a barn 20 ft. long). 

Eleazer Dowse mortgaged (1760, dis. 1770) to Dr. I. Rand, 
dwelling-house, shop, barn, etc., at 132, and claimed (54) £369. 10s. 
for loss in 1775, only £17. 10s. of which was for personal estate. He 
had valued a house in Main St. £266. 13. 4; a barn, workhouse, and 
smoke-house, £73. 6. 8.. His son, Thomas Dowse, LL. D., born in 
1771, collected (in Cambridgeport) one of the most superb and ex- 
tensive private libraries of English literature ever in N. E., that he 
gave to the Mass. Historical Society. 

Back of several lots just described was part of the large amount of 
land owned by Joseph Lynde, which included the site of the State 
Prison. He lost about ten buildings, and some of them may have 
been here. Beyond 132, and along" the street northward, was 133, 
an extensive tract of land owned by Richard Miller (whose marsh 
was opposite D. Wood). He died in 1755 (see p. 128), and his heirs 
gave (1765) a general quitclaim to his son Richard, who seems to 
have held, and to have sold after the war to Jon. Chapman and others. 
A large part of lots 129 to 132, and of the Lynde and Miller land, in 
now occupied by wooden houses, most of them old. On Main St., at 
129, are, however, two four-storied brick buildings with stores below 
and dwellings above, and also on Main St., and each side of Chapman 
St., a little beyond the end of Plan IV., is a block of three-storied 
brick houses set a few feet back from the street. They occupy the 
site of the Chapman distillery, a large, low building, that was for years 
dingy and unsavory. Three of the most notable places on this large 
area were (at the end of Plan IV.) the garden of S. Johnson, small 
but very fine, now covered by a shop ; the grass area in front of Dr. 
Cheever's house (next S.) with two of the noblest trees on private 
ground on the peninsula, cut down (1885) to make way also for a shop ; 



PLAN iv: 










THE TOWN IX 1775. 149 

and the printing establishment of S. Etheridge, and of his son. The 
two houses, altered, still stand, of wood, with three low stories, and 
ends on the street ; but the building whence issued a large part of the 
volumes ever printed in town was burned over forty years ago. It 
stood at some distance back from the street, at 132-3, and was of 
brick and three stories high. Mr. Etheridge (Sr.) bought the estate, 
with a house, in 1806, and did a good deal of creditable work here, 
continued by his son (1810-17), but neither of them had the pecuniary 
success that their enterprise and skill deserved. (The G. and E., 
which is very imperfect in regard to the earlier printers in the town, 
mixes the father and son in a brief notice.) 

On Main St. the more closely occupied ground ended at 113 and 
132 on Plan IV., and northward, except in three neighborhoods, there 
were only scattered houses. These groups and a few of the notable 
houses were successively as follows : — 

At the right, a little beyond the end of Plan IV., and opposite the 
Chapman estate just mentioned, is a square house, three stories high, 
the upper story low, and set a few feet back from the street. It is 
built of wood, and was arranged for, and much of the time occupied 
by, two families. Internally it was well and quaintly finished, but 
now it is much changed. According to Drake (S. A., Hist. Mansions, 
1874, p. 19), this was the first house "erected in Charlestown after 
its destruction in 1775," — a statement repeated in the Memorial 
History of Boston (1880). In these accounts it is called the house, 
or mansion, of Thos. Edes, where Samuel F. B. Morse was born, to 
become one of the most distinguished natives of the town, renowned 
for his inventions, and remarkable for the honors he received. There 
is a report, traced to one of the oldest inhabitants, that this house was 
built about 1759, partly of oak grown on the hill close by, and that 
the British used it as a bakehouse during their occupation of the pe- 
ninsula, in evidence of which was a remarkably large hearth found 
under the floor of a back room by the present owner. Papers be- 
longing to another family and dated before the war are said to have 
been found at the same time under the floor of the second story. 
As shown already (p. 11), the house here before 1775 was probably 
not burned June 17th, but used by the British, and its destruction 
must have been later. Mr. Wood's own list of losses is given under 
118. As he was a baker his services would be early in demand, and 
he may have speedily built, and have worked in the back part of his 
house, thus accounting for the hearth. Thos. Edes, a leather-dresser, 
who does not appear to have held real estate (G. and E., 322), mar- 



150 MAIN ST. TO MILL VILLAGE. 

ried (1761) a daughter of D. Wood, who after his death married 
(1793) John Stanton. As Mrs. Stanton she bought the estate (1797) 
of the heirs of Wood, and held it until her death (1818). 

Farther north on Main St., and on this side (easterly), the houses 
seem to have been more separated. Opposite the shop of R. Miller 
(lot 133) was John Stone's estate, 68 ft. front, bought in 1766, in 
his claim (108), and sold by his wife (1795). Isaac Call (98), 
who married a daughter of Dea. John Frothingham, lost a shop. 
Isaac Kidder & Son bought (1774) adjoining Frothingham prop- 
erty and claimed (101) for a dwelling, as did SamP (or more likely 
Jas.) Kenney (103), who had also a shop. He bought in this neigh- 
borhood (1767) and sold in 1787. John Stimpson also owned prop- 
erty originally Frothingham, but long in his family, and claimed (93) 
for a dwelling in " fore street." Next to him Mercy Frothingham 
claimed (300) for § of a house, a woodhouse, and furniture. 

On the other (westerly) side, at the corner of Miller St. (?), Ste- 
phen Pierce (106) held (1768 to 1800) a lot 157 ft. front, and 330 
to 367 ft. deep. He lost a house, barn, and "furintur," Next him 
seems to have been John Chamberlain, who bought just before the 
war, and claimed (62) for a house new-shingled, with four lower 
rooms, one chamber, fine new sash windows, and a shop at the back. 

Thomas Wood claimed (66) the unusually large amount of 
£412. 10s. for loss on personal estate. He seems to have been a 
dealer in furniture, and had a large stock, including 43 desks, 23 
tables, etc. His place was near the entrance to the old Burying- 
ground. Opposite it he had a pasture, and Benj. Wood a lot of 
mowing ground, and a small claim (52). Margaret Thomas, 
spinster, had a hard time hereabouts, buying (1773) on mortgage a 
house on Main St., claiming (63) for loss of it (1775), and having the 
mortgage foreclosed (1776) by Gov. Increase Sumner. Sarah 
Frothingham also hereabouts (?) had a claim (69) for loss of a 
house, and personal estate. 

Mill Village and Neighborhood. 

This was a group of houses at and near the junction of Main, Mill, 
and Eden Sts. Approaching it from the south, there were several 
estates on the Westerly side of 3Iain St. Abigail Frothingham 
(64), wife of Thos. (he died Dec, 1775), lost a house "in fore street," 
a barn, and a "joyner's" shop. Jonas Eaton (67) lost a house 
40 X 21, and outhouse 25 X 18, covering-shop 20 X 18, bark-house 
25 X 20, and a good mill with 9 " tanpats." Next was Maj. Benj. 



THE TOWN IN 1775. 151 

Frothingham (68), who lived on the lot next north of the engine- 
house opposite Walker St., and who lost a dwelling, barn, and shop. 
At his house, built of course after the war. Gen. Washington made 
the only piivate call — the only call — that he ever made in Charles- 
town. All the three last-named losses included personal. The Froth- 
inghams held lands in this neighborhood from its settlement, owning 
nearly across the peninsula, and, until recent years, being here rep- 
resented by several families. Richard's great square wooden house, 
built after the war at the corner of Eden St., was prominent. Mrs. 
F. Hall still represents the family on their old ground, in a well- 
known and hospitable house, a brick one with a swell front and 
three stories. John Fenton, named in the Leach sketch, was some- 
where near here. Wm. Wyer claimed (210) for loss of the Cape 
Breton Tavern at the corner of Main St. and Mill St., the site of 
which he sold (1785) to B. and E. Mitchell. From the "main Road" 
a highway 25 feet wide led to the mills, that in some form stood from 
early to recent times. For losses here Wm. Pain claimed (72) £800., 
the value of eight buildings, — a large double dwelling, a barn 30 X 18, 
a mill-house with 2 gristmills, a store 60 X 24, a store 30 X 16, a 
fulling-mill with 3 pairs of stocks, a smoke-house, a wharf, and gates 
to the mill pond. These buildings, or some of them, were not de- 
stroyed until Jan. 1776, and then by Americans as a necessity of 
war. Wm. Greene claimed (70) £120. for a house, cistern, and 
wharf, near them. 

On the easterly side of Main St., approaching from the south. Leach 
has marked successively, with the lengths of frontages on the street, 
*' Jos. Frothingham " (60 ft.), who claimed (59) £358. for loss on 
buildings; "J. Frothingham" (114ft.); "Colley"(?) (72ft.); "from 
Mr. Eaton [foot of p. 150} over to Galleys is 54 Feet" (Survey, 
1767) ; Robert Calley was a schoolmaster in town for some years ; "J. 
Frothingham " (40 ft.), James claimed for a shop (142) ; " N. Froth- 
ingham" (97 ft.), Nathaniel claimed (96) £676. for losses on real 
estate; "Wm. Frothingham" (90 ft.) claimed (94) £436. for a 
house, shop, barn, and orchard. Furniture and a house were reported 
lost by Sam. Frothingham. The next lot is marked by Leach vacant ; 
the next "Edes," and the last he notes on the street, "Mallet's 
house," appears to have been Isaac Mallet's, "blacksmith" and 
"schoolmaster at the neck," who had considerable property and a 
claim (89) £558. Martha Mallet (90) had a small claim. In 
this region seems to have been Bethia, widow of Thos. Call, who 
stated a loss of a dwelling, barn, and outhouse. From the Mill Village 



152 NECK VILLAGE AND NEIGHBORHOOD. 

to the end of the neck by the main land the ground along Main St. 

was low, and much of it marshy, so that it was overflowed by high 

tides, thus accounting for an absence of houses on it for nearly half a 

mile. The Survey of 1767 mentions little except marshes, lands, and 

fences. 

Neck Village and Neighhorhood. 

There was a group of estates and houses on the main land close to 
the narrow neck. Of the owners Abigail Williams (81) lost fur- 
niture ; John Hancock (84) a large dwelling, barn, and small build- 
ings (see 73) ; James Fosdick (part of 86) a dwelling "just without 
the Neck," and his fences and trees were damaged; the estate of 
Jabez Whittemore (87), "innkeeper," who died in 1773, a house, 
barn, and store ; Wm. Lamson, who lost boats and other personal, 
and .Joseph Lamson, who had a large and comfortable estate, lost a 
dwelling with 3 stacks of chimneys, a shop, barn, etc. (He also had 
a wharf, and about a dozen acres of land, most of it cultivated.) 
Frances Lamson, for John, deceased, stated a loss of a house " with 
5 smoaks," a shop, storehouse, and barn. Some of the Temple prop- 
erty (see next page) was close by, and apparently some of its large 
loss (416). 

At a short distance was the ferry to Maiden, and on the way to it 
was John Beacham (80), who lost a large dwelling with 14 rooms, 
a barn, "wearhouse," goldsmith shop, and sundry small buildings 
(Relief Ellery reported that the Continental forces took much fur- 
niture and clothing, owned by her, from his (?) house June 17) ; 
also Capt. Beal (82) £120. on real estate; Stephen Sweetser 
(83), "ferryman," who lost a house and barn; and Lydia Abbot 
(99) near the ferry, who had a house and shop. All these had per- 
sonal losses. Stephen Miller (395) lost chiefly trees, fences, etc. 
On the road to Medford was John Deland, who stated that he lost a 
house, barn, and woodhouse. 

As buildings included in these losses were much too far from the 
main town to catch fire from it, they were probably destroyed by 
the British " armed transport " stationed to rake the neck. The de- 
struction, probably from the same source, extended inland and along 
the road to Cambridge, that for some distance was near the water. 

In the Mass. Archives (138, p. 350) is a small leaf without date, 
place, or signature, but relating to this subject, with a statement of 
" The Number of Houses that was Exposed to an armed Vessel of a 
Hundred Tun Burden — Daniel Whittemore House ; Joseph Whitte- 
more ; John Burdit ; John Nickols, Ebeu'' Pratt ; Daniel Waters ; 



THE TOWN IN 1775. 153 

Benj' Blaney ; John Barrot ; Eben^ Sargeant ; John Bucknam ; Aaron 
Bucknam ; Thomas Sargeant ; Stephen Pain ; Joseph Pain ; Widow 
Barrots; Number 15. — The Houses exposed to the Cannon on Bun- 
kerhill, John Beachams ; Stephen Greens ; Samuel Sweetzer ; Benj? 
Sprague; Ebenf Barrot; Number 6. — and Twelve more houses Ex- 
posed to a Flooting Battery np our North River; 12 + 6 + 15 = 33 ; 
these thirty three Houses was Exposed to the Enemy Without it 
Being in our Power to hurt our Enemy." 

Apparently on Cambridge road were losses claimed by Martha 
(404), Thomas (434), and John (437) Ireland, for crops, fences, 
"locos" and "Frute" trees; Jos. Phipps (424), who lost a dwelling, 
bakehouse adjoining, a barn, fences, trees, and crops ; John Deland, 
who lost a dwelling, barn, and woodhouse ; Eunice Miller (428), 
whose house was damaged ; as were the trees, fences, etc., of Abra- 
ham Frost (430). Peleg Stearns (417) claimed for 2 houses, 2 
barns, outhouses, and fences. Ebenezer Shed (407) stated the 
loss of his part of a "hows an barn an chear hows" (£140., besides 
£279. 3. 2. to crops, fences, etc.), April 19th, and with the same 
name (409) and date there is a long list of tools, crops, etc., lost; 
also " the wido abigal Sheds thirds " damaged in " apil," and " locest 
tres," small house, etc. James Miller (398), stated (G. and E., 669) 
to have been killed by the British April 19 (but whose list is dated 
Needham, Feb. 19th), lost £4. 12. by "the Regulars" April 19th, 
and £16. June 17th. Hereabouts seem to have been the large losses 
of Wm. Barker (51) (Barber?) "19th of June," a dwelling, "his 
house on the wharfe by the Ferry," etc., and of Mary Barker, of 
furniture in her father's house. The estate of Sam. Kent (438) lost 
little but on trees, fences, etc., while (hereabouts ?) Jos. Whittemorb 
(233) lost a dwelling, a shop separate, a " warehouse with shed to 
pack fish in," furniture, etc., and Whittemore and Kettell (236) 
a dwelling where Jos. W. lived. 

At some distance inland, arose claims for the estate of Wm. Tufts 
(440), who died in 1773, chiefly on trees, fences, etc.; the small one 
of Peter Tufts (401) ; the much larger one of Peter Tufts, Jr. 
(399), that included £358. damages on lands (the second in amount 
of this sort, — £416., R. Temple, being the largest), and probably 
Sam. Tufts (420) similar, and also large. [David Tufts also pre- 
sented a claim for crops.] 

Joseph Teel reported damage to furniture, clothing, etc., part of it 
"done by our own people," in a "house on way leading into Temple's 



154 TEN HILLS FARM. 

farm." This last was the important historic estate called " The Ten- 
Hills Farm," that extended along M^'stic Eiver about half a mile be 
yond the Neck, and was open to fire from British guns brought up 
by water, as apparently they were. A descendant of Sir Purbeck 
Temple (G. and E., 938) of Co. Bucks, Eng., Robert Temple, held 
it and claimed (41 G) for losses in 1775, amounting to £965. 4s., none 
of which was on buildings, and £2G0. on personal estate. This was 
the original country seat of Gov. J. Winthrop, whose heirs sold the 
farm (1677) to the widow of Peter Lidgett, merchant, of Boston. 
Her daughter married Lt.-Gov. Usher, of N. H., into whose posses- 
sion the farm seems to have passed after his wife's death (1698), for 
he mortgaged it (1707-10, etc.) described as "309 acres upland, 146 
acres marsh." At his death it was estimated 500 acres, worth 
£10,000. From the Usher heirs it passed (1740) to Robt. Temple, 
and from him to his son (above), who, 1764-65, mortgaged it as 
251^ acres. From the Temples it passed (1780) to N. Tracy, mer- 
chant, of Cambridge and Newburyport, and later (1785) it was mort- 
gaged to lion. Thomas Russell, when there were about 300 acres, 
with buildings (deed 91, 408). In May, 1842, by a map (1 B. 48, 
deeds) the farm extended along the line of Medford from the river 
to Winter Hill road, and by these to a creek eastward. Subsequently 
the farm was occupied by Col. S. Jaques, an agriculturalist and sports- 
man, who kept his dogs, dressed somewhat in the quaint fashion of 
an English country squire, and, in a degree, followed his ways, and 
lived in a square, two-storied,l'wooden house, shaded by a few elms 
and standing conspicuously on one of the hills towards the river. 
His heirs mortgaged the farm (1852-58) when it was a remnant of 
80 acres, 25 rods, all between the river and Medford turnpike. The 
whole place is now (1887) dismantled, as it has been for years, leav- 
ing it a dreary waste as the ending of the one early estate in the 
town resembling or suggesting an English gentleman's country seat. 

In the long list of claims there are a few that the writer has not 
placed, accurately or probably, as on the foregoing pages. These 
claims are of Nehemiah Norcross (13), a workshop, etc., £26. — 
Estate of Nath. Souther (121), a house with a kitchen, and a barn, 
£125. — Thomas Newell (209), a dwelling and a little furniture, 
£200. — Sam. Harris (232), dwelling and bakehouse, "which Cost 
me £186. 13. 4," claim £200. — T. Dayley (251), a dwelling, out- 
house, and " New finsing," also furniture, £87. (a claim seems not to 
have been allowed for his " beeing Cast away on account of not knowing 



TOWN LIST OF LOSSES, 1775. 155 

Wliere for to Come to on the 6 day of Novemb. 1774"). — Estate 
of Thomas Dizart (252) (list by widow Mary ?), dwelling with 3 
lower rooms, 2 chambers, 2 garretts, 2 stacks chimneys, a large barn, 
a little house, 50 trees bearing fruit, furniture, etc., £395. 3. 2, made 
in the claim £250. (B. Hill, near the Training field?) — JoN. Carey 
(286), dwelling and furniture, £80. — John Carey (287), dwelling, 
work-house, timber, and furniture, £213. (Mardling St.?). — Sam. 
Preston (298), of Littleton, J of a house, and J of a house, £116. — 
Benj. Mirick (363), dwelling adjoining Jos. Hopkins, £10. (Fish St. ?). 

Besides the claims that include buildings, nearly all of which have 
been located, there were many for personal property only, furniture, 
shop-stock, loss of trees, crops, fences, and other damage, most of 
which it would be hard to place. The object of the writer, after great 
labor, has been attained, — that of finding the arrangement and ex- 
tent of the town burned. 

Among the lists prepared by the individual sufferers there are 
names and buildings — especially parts of the latter — mentioned and 
not found on the list of the committee. Of these the writer finds un- 
certain the location of Sarah Call's ^ of a house ; John Harding's f 
of a dwelling, on Main St., with 3 rooms on a floor, 3 square cham- 
bers, and a garret ; Thos. Hender's house and furniture ; Eliz. Miller's 
dwelling (main st.) ; Sarah Miller's house and barn ; Thos. Powar's 
house ; some of Dr. Rand's houses ; Mary Rand's half house and 
barn ; Mary Smith's mansion, outhouse, and large shop ; Aaron Town- 
send's house, "which cost more than £80.;" and Henry Sweetser's 
shop and tools. Claims for some of these may have been finally made 
under other names. 



TOWN LIST OF LOSSES, JUNE 17, 1775. 

A BOOK in MS., lettered Charlestown Archives, Vol. 59, among the 
records of the Town, bears a written title on its third page : " This 
Book contains, | an Estimate of the Loss | sustained, by the Inhabi- 
tants of I Charlestown | by the Destruction there of | June 1 7'!' Anno 
Domini, | 1776." The first and fourth pages are blank, the second 
bears " R. Deven's " at the upper left corner, and the date shows an 
error of one year, as is found to be the case elsewhere in the records. 

At the top of the fifth page is the entry : " In the Committee af>- 
pointed by the Inhabitants of | Charlestown at their meeting in March 
1776 to receive | and liquidate the Accounts of Losses said Inhabitants | 
have sustained by burning the Buildings in Charlestown | and other 



156 TOWN LIST OF LOSSES, 1775. 

Ravages of the British Troops in said town." Also : " Voted, as the 
sense of this Committee, that in making | the Estimate above referred 
to, it will be expedient to | consider the losses in the following manner, 
viz5 first, I The loss on Buildings the sum to be allowed for any | Build- 
ing to be so much as will make the Building as good | as it was imme- 
diately before its destruction, Secondly | the Damage done to Land, 
Trees and fences. Thirdly, the | loss in personal Estate." 

The lower third of this page is blank, and there are neither signa- 
tures, names of the Committee, place of meeting, nor date. On the 
next page the following list of losses begins. In order to determine 
the extent and plan of the town in 1775, the writer endeavored to 
place as nearly as he could, after much labor, each loss, or the home 
of each claimant, as this course was the only one by which a nearly 
satisfactory result could be obtained, and for reference the whole list 
is here printed (for the first time, it is thought). 

The Town meeting that acted in the matter was held " at Mr. Jere- 
miah Snow's, innholder, in Charlestown, March 6, 1776," without the 
.peninsula, all within having been destroyed. The Committee con- 
sisted of the seven Selectmen : NathI Gorham, Nath! Frothingham, 
Peter Tufts, Jr., Capt. Jno. Stanton, Stephen Miller, David Wood, Jr., 
and Tim° Tufts, to whom were added Richard Devens, Benj. Hurd, 
Thos. "Wood, Peleg Stearns, John Larkin, and David Cheever. April 3, 
Capt. Nathan Adams, Eben"^ Breed, Capt. Isaac Foster, Nath' Brown, 
John Frothingham, and John Turner were also added. It was voted 
that any seven of the nineteen were to be a quorum, and that meetings 
should be held in Cambridge. The report was made and accepted 
May 16, 1776. Later meetings were held in "Mr. Swan's barn," and 
" at the house of Mrs. Anna Whittemore, innholder." Note of the 
ill-success of this and other efforts has already been made. 

The numbers 1 to 484, and the last column of references to places, 
are added to the original list by the writer for convenience. 



TOWN LIST OF LOSSES, 1775. 



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TOWN LIST OF LOSSES, 1775. 



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TOWN LIST OF LOSSES, 1775, 



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TOWN LIST OF LOSSES, 1775. 163 



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164 



TOWN LIST OF LOSSES, 1775. 



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TOWN LIST OF LOSSES, 1775. 



165 



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166 



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TOWN LIST OF LOSSES, 1775. 



167 



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168 



TOWN LIST OF LOSSES, 1775. 



■^ O lO 
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TOWN LIST OF LOSSES, 1775. 169 



(p CO CO ^» 

OOOOOOOOOO'^OCOIMOOOOOOOOOOCOOOOO 

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170 TOWN LIST OF LOSSES, 1775. 



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eoeoeoeocoeoeoeceoeocoeocccoeoeoeoeococooseoeoeoeo 



TOWN LIST OF LOSSES, 1775. 171 



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172 



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TOWN LIST OF LOSSES, 1775. 



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THE FIKST CHUECH. 

A SKETCH OF ITS HISTORY.^ 



IN July, 1630, several hundred English — men, women, and children 
— were trying to live in huts and tents on or around the Town 
Hill in Charlestown. They had recently escaped discomforts on the 
sea for privations on shore. Seven small vessels that had brought 
them from kindred and former homes, lay in the river. Forests and 
wild lands, where there were men as wild, spread inland. There were 
no mines or great extents of fertile land, and there were few to wel- 
come or to help them. Nearly all of the inhabitants were Indians, so 
called. Along the coasts of what we name New England there were 
only scanty groups of countrymen: in Maine perhaps five hundred 
persons ; in Rhode Island and Connecticut were none ; in Massachusetts 
were a few, but little more than those at Salem, Beverly, and Lynn, 
at Dorchester and Plymouth ; there was one man on the neighboring 
peninsula of Boston, and on Noddle's Island, Samuel Maverick. 

Plainly reasons that had brought these people from their mother 
land to this Town Hill were strong, and principles that they believed 
had a vital power, attested by the presence on the spot of their succes- 
sors now that two centuries and a half have passed. The reasons for 
their coming, like the reasons for most of the great events of history, 
were of long growth. The Reformation in the sixteenth century had 
been marked by important changes in the thoughts and the belief of 
English people. The Roman Church, acknowledged for a thousand 

^ This article by the writer was read by him in the meeting-house on Sunday 
evening, Nov. 12, 1882, at the commemoration of the two hmidred and fiftieth 
anniversary of the church. Parts were then omitted, owing to lack of time. With 
a sermon by the Eev. Alexander McKenzie, D.D., delivered in the afternoon, and 
addresses by the Rev. Rufus Ellis, D.D., the Hon. Judge Charles Devens, the Kev. 
Henry M. Dexter, D.D., the Rev. A. S. Freeman, D.D., and the Rev. A. S. 
Twombly, D.D., it was privately printed, with other matter by the writer, in an 
octavo pamphlet. It is here reprinted as a supplement to accounts of the church 
on these pages, and an introduction to the following parts of its records. 



176 THE FIRST CHUECH. 

years, at length became no longer dominant. A large proportion of 
the people were, in some form, Protestants. These, while agreed sub- 
stantially in faith, had different opinions upon some points held to be 
of profound importance. Out of the religious change arose the Church 
of England, with the sovereign, not the Pope, as its appointed earthly 
head, and a reformed but yet conservative observance of some forms 
and words and usages that had been known since Christianity became 
an organized and wide-spread power. Within the Church, at first, 
there was, however, a great body, with a large amount of piety and 
learning, that desired still greater change. This, at length, in King 
James's reign, could be reduced, it has been stated, " to these four 
heads : purity of doctrine, the supply of the churches with good pastors, 
the Scriptural administration of church government, and the improve- 
ment of the Book of Common Prayer." The advocates of greater 
change — and greater purity, as they believed — were known as Puri- 
tans. The Church of England became the ruling power ; and, world 
wide, ruling powers in Church and State, when James I. was king, re- 
garded a dissenter as a sort of rebel who should be suppressed. The 
Puritans were made to feel this fact. 

And thus a vigorous, intelligent, determined party chafed in England 
under rule from which it naturally sought relief or an escajje ; and 
sundry men within it were considering not only an escape, but reali- 
zation of a grand conception. 

John Winthrop, a well-educated, wealthy gentleman of rare and 
noble character, who lived at Groton in the pleasant rural lands of 
Suffolk ; Thomas Dudley, once a soldier, later a good steward to the 
Earl of Lincoln ; Increase Nowell, well bred and long tried, among 
whose nearer ancestors or relatives was Alexander, the prolocutor of 
Queen Elizabeth's first convocation, so decisive to the Puritans ; John 
"Wilson, son of William, prebend of three of the grand churches of Old 
England, — these and many others, scattered through that country, 
thought and acted. 

Meanwhile different events prepared a way for them. At a time 
when, says Dr. Haven, English " colonization [of America] had been 
virtually abandoned in despair," two men, to whom this country owes 
much, sought " a proper seat for a plantation " in New England. In 
1602 the illustrious friend of Shakespeare, the Earl of Southampton, 
largely paid the cost of an important voyage made by Bartholomew 
Gosnold directly to the Bay of Massachusetts, to Cape Cod and islands 
south of it. He brought back such good accounts of what he found 
that, four years later, for the purpose named, a charter was procured, 



ITS BEGINNING. 177 

" from which," continues Dr. Haven, " the ultimate settlement of the 
United States, and the resulting heritage of territorial rights, are to be 
dated." 

It may be sufficient here to state that after various difficulties there 
was formed — Nov. 3, 1G20 — The Council at Plymouth in Devon 
for Planting and Governing New England in America. There were 
forty patentees, of whom several were peers, the others men of conse- 
quence. From them the Pilgrims by the Mayflower obtained a patent 
dated June 1, 1621. From them, March, 1628, a grant was had of 
lands " extending from the Atlantic to the Western Ocean," and be- 
tween a line " three miles north of the River Merrimac," to one " three 
miles south of the Charles." In one year after that, a Massachusetts 
Company was chartered, with the power to colonize, govern, and repel 
by sea or land all persons who attempted the destruction or the detri- 
ment of planters. It, indeed, was a commercial and a planting company, 
and soon prepared to prosecute its business. 

" Meanwhile," wrote Dr. Palfrey, " a movement of the utmost im- 
portance, probably meditated long before, was hastened by external 
pressure." Puritans, who felt the strong repression of their principles 
in England, had resolved, but after " sorrowful reluctance," " to emi- 
grate at once to the New World." Most of them were from the eastern 
counties, — Suffolk, Lincolnshire, and the East Riding. The leaders 
were well-educated, thoughtful, and far-looking men, with no small 
fortunes, and exalted purposes. The wise and energetic use of all 
their means resulted in the chief attempt to colonize New England 
that had yet been made, and the presence on Town Hill in Charles- 
town, July, 1630, of large numbers of the colonists associated with 
them. Many, and perhaps the great majority, appear to have been 
plain, substantial country -people, — they, like their leaders, thoroughly 
devoted to Puritanism, and endowed with vigorous English sense. 

Their purposes could not be fully told in England, where and when 
these might be hindered or prevented. They came here to settle, plant, 
and build, to earn an honest living, and make homes as good as could 
be, for they knew the worth of homes. 

But wider and far higher than material things was the great purpose 
of their coming. It was not for wealth alone, or power, or toleration 
as we know it. "Their lofty and soul-enthralling aim," says Dr. 
Ellis, "the condition and reward of all their severe sufferings and 
arduous efforts, was the establishment and administration here of a 
religious and civil commonwealth . . . founded" on "the Bible, the 
whole Bible ; " or as Governor Winthrop wrote, " whereas the way of 

12 



178 THE FIRST CHURCH. 

God hath always been to gather his churches out of the world ; now 
the world, or civil state, must be raised out of the churches." 

Without delay the colonists began, with sturdy English pluck and 
sense, the ordering of things material by which they were to live, of 
needed civil institutions, and above all of their churches that were as 
the soul to the material body. 

July 8, 1630, they kept a public day of thanksgiving for their ar- 
rival, a day observed through all the plantations ; one that might be 
called the first great New England Thanksgiving, and observed upon 
Town Hill by probably the largest number of English that had yet 
been gathered on New England ground. 

Friday, July 30, the covenant of a church was signed, upon or near 
this hill. On August 27 John "Wilson was appointed teacher, Increase 
Nowell ruling elder. The number of members was about one hundred. 
The first place of meeting is said to have been under the Charlestown 
Oak ; afterwards the services were in the Great House, so called, built 
for the governor, and standing near the southwest corner of the present 
City Square. 

The settlers failed to find good water that was close by, and disease 
prevailed. A movement was begun across the river to a neighboring 
peninsula. By autumn a large number were established there ; and 
on September 7, old style, the town that they began was known as 
Boston. In November the governor, the minister, and other chief 
men moved there. Church service, it is said, was held alternately in 
the two places. It was two years later when the first meeting-house 
in Boston was erected. As Hubbard says, " they made but one con- 
gregation for the present." As Governor Hutchinson wrote, "they 
considered themselves, ... at first, as but one settlement and one 
church, with Mr. Wilson for their minister." At length a large part 
of the people wei'e in Boston, services w^ere chiefly held there, storms 
and ice in winter made the passage of the river difficult, and when the 
fall of 1G32 was closing, it was thought best that a separate church 
should be established here. Governor Winthrop states that " those of 
Charlestown who had formei-ly been joined to Boston congregation were 
dismissed" from it. They numbered nearly- one fourth of it. The 
Records of the First Church, Charlestown, state that the first (35) 
signers of its covenant "were dismissed from Boston Church," — one 
that from the beginning has been very prominent and influential, known 
as the First Church, Boston, of which Hubbard wrote two hundred 
years ago, " some have been heard to say, they believed [it] to be the 
most "lorious church in the world." 



II 



ITS ORGANIZATION. 179 

Friday, Nov. 2, 1632, — Nov. 12, new style, — was made a day 
of fasting and prayer in Charlestown. Sixteen men, all with their 
wives, and three men singly, signed a church covenant, and formed 
the organization to-day existing here. The Rev. Thomas James, a 
graduate of Emanuel College, Cambridge, was elected and ordained 
the pastor. Ralph Mousall and Thomas Hale became the first two 
deacons. With serious contemplation of their place and mission, this 
small band of thirty-five began their work. The territory of the town 
at first was large and long, extending eight miles up into the country, 
but soon became diminished by formation of new towns. In ten years 
Woburn was incorporated ; seven years later. Maiden. 

A great part of the population for a long time occupied a village 
near the present Square and Boston ferry, or along " the Country 
Road," now called Main Street. Moving out of Charlestown, that 
began so early and extensively, has always since continued ; yet the 
town has constantly increased in population. Of the nineteen families 
that had been represented on the covenant of 1632, eight were gone 
within a dozen years, two more in fifty, six more in about a century. 
The settlement of the first minister lasted less than three years and a 
half, but after his time settlements were long ; nine made before the 
Revolution averaged more than twenty-five years each, including two 
that prematurely closed by early deaths. 

The first name on the covenant signed here, November, 1632, was 
Increase Nowell, who. Dr. Budington wrote, "may be considered the 
father of the church and the town. He was a zealous Puritan and 
active and devout Christian, and deserves to be held in grateful esteem 
by the citizens of this Commonwealth, and especially by the inhabitants 
of this town." He left abundance in Old England for privations here. 
His immediate family, before and after him, was honorable. His sons, 
Alexander and Samuel, were graduates of Harvard. The former wrote 
an almanac for 1665, printed by Samuel Green at Cambridge in that 
year. The latter was styled the "excellent" and "never-to-be-for- 
gotten," the " Fighting Chaplain in Philip's War." Both were among 
the very earliest writers in this town whose work was printed in Amer- 
ica. Another name is Ralph Mousall, one of the first two deacons. 
He was a selectman for nearly twenty-five years, and from 1636 to 
1638 a representative to the General Court, that expelled him, after 
questionmg him about what he had said in favor of Mr. Wheelright, 
who had delivered an obnoxious Fast Sermon. Historians tell us now 
that the Court was wrong and the Deacon was right. John Hale, the 
other deacon, was a selectman for eleven years. His son John, bap- 



180 



THE FIRST CHUECH. 



tized here 4th month, 5th day, 1G36, became the first minister at 
Beverly, and author of "A Modest Enquiry into the Nature of Witch- 
craft," printed in 1702, — perhaps the rarest book on witchcraft in 
New England, and worth more now, for its size at least, than perhaps 
any other New England book of the eighteenth century. 

Two other signers were William and Ann Frothingham, the only 
signers whose name and lineage now remain, or for many years have 
remained, in this town. Their descendants have been numerous ; con- 
stantly some of them have been in positions of trust. Three of them 
successively were deacons of this church, their terms of office reaching 
nmety-seven years. And, at a time like this, how we lament the ab"- 
sence here of one in whose too early death so many of us lost a friend, 
and Charlestown one of its most cherished citizens and its historian, — 
Eichard Frothingham ! 

Dec. 22, 1634, the Rev. Zechariah Symmes was here installed. 
Born in Canterbury, that delightful ancient city closely associated with 
the planting of the Christian faith in England, — another graduate of 
Emanuel, — he labored here for thirty-seven years. Meanwhile, a 
common school was established, — eleven years before the law of Mas- 
sachusetts ordered that a town must have one. 

On the 6th of November, 1637, the Rev. John Harvard, still another 
from Emanuel, became a member of this church. He, for some por- 
tion of his brief time here, supplied the pulpit, and died on Sept. 14, 
1638. We all know how and where his name has been enshrined,' 
and how in those days of small things great things arose, and Puri' 
tans by the Bay of Massachusetts testified to their belief in true, sound 
learning. John Harvard of Charlestown gave about twice as much 
as the whole colony had dared to promise for the college that was 
begun at Cambridge. 

In 1639 the Rev. Thomas Allen, like many of his people an Eastern 
County man, was installed, or was ordained, as teacher and assistant. 
He remained here for twelve years. 

Meanwhile the purposes of those who founded Massachusetts were 
developed, and affairs with which they or their children had to deal. 
The Synod of 1637 was assembled to consider doctrines held by Mrs. 
Anne Hutchinson; a second in 1648 to form an ecclesiastical consti- 
tution; and another in 1662, of great importance, respecting baptism 
and a consociation of churches. In 1648 a case of witchcraft is said 
to have originated in this town, and to have been the first in Massa- 
chusetts. A few years later occurred the dealings with the Quakers, 
60 often mentioned. The leading member of this sect in Charlestown 
was severely fined. 



EARLY CHARACTERISTICS. 181 

Grave charges of intolerance, of persecution, and of superstition 
have been made against the Puritans in Massachusetts. The plain 
statement of their rights, of their position, and their purpose here, is 
quite sufficient answer to much said against them. They were here 
at first as members of a private corporation, through which they had 
honestly obtained their lands for homes where they proposed to carry 
out their plan of a religious state, as they could not in England. They 
had invested, labored, suffered for their purpose. Through all their 
earlier period of weakness they must do no less than keep out those 
who would impair, imperil, or even ruin their great plan. It may be 
questioned whether any church, society, or club, or school, in its own 
building, now could safely do much less. Whatever may be thought 
about their plan, it was one well worth trying ; and Americans owe 
quite enough to them to be at least both just and civil to them. 

All of the Quakers, two centuries ago, were not the counterparts of 
estimable Quakers of late generations and to-day. It is a question 
whether sundry of their ways would be allowed in public now. " The 
Puritans," Judge Parker wrote, " had no peace, but ' torment upon 
torment' from the Quakers." And, indeed, "so far from the Puri- 
tans persecuting the Quakers, it was the Quakers who persecuted the 
Puritans." 

"What is now called the witchcraft delusion was once a belief, — one 
of the few beliefs in which, it has been said, the various divisions 
among Christians once remarkably agreed. A person who uses names, 
dates, and facts found in New England in the last half of the seven- 
teenth century, and does not heed others, may make it seem that 
our forefathers were a superstitious and bloodthirsty race. They did 
act harshly in some cases ; we wish now we could say in none. But 
things in this world are comparative as well as positive. Men should 
be judged by their own age, and not by our age. "When the wide, long 
prevalence of a belief in witchcraft and its punishment are thought of, 
we realize that a curious characteristic that marked their times, to but 
a moderate extent marked them. 

It is sad that even one trial of a man by torture ever has occurred 
in Massachusetts ; but when we examine what the seventeenth century 
was through Christendom, — the appalling use of torture in ecclesi- 
astical and civil cases, the abominable dungeons, — we can feel deep 
thankfulness that our forefathers were so much less cruel than their 
age. And furthermore, there seems to be good reason for believing 
that instead of being chief among the sinners, they were first among 
those who reformed, and who renounced what we now hold to be an 



182 THE FIRST CHURCH. 

error. They had their faults, of course, and we may now be even 
glad that we did not live with them ; bnt when Americans must make 
apologies because they hurt the feelings of George III., it may be time 
to make apologies for our old Puritans, and not until that time. 

Their virtues and heroic faith have been already here to-day re- 
vealed afresh with eloquence and truth, in a discourse [by the Rev. Alex- 
ander McKenzie, D.D.] to which no other words than those of thanks 
and appreciation can be added. 

In 1658 died good John Green, the only ruling elder of the church, 
admitted to it less than five months after it was organized. He kept 
its early records and those of the town. His admirable writing is a 
model, testifying to his careful thoroughness. 

In 1669 another celebrated Boston church was organized in Charles- 
town, — the Old South. Its first minister, the Rev. Thomas Thatcher, 
was a member of this church. 

At this period two pastors of our church are especially distinguished : 
Thomas Shepard, who was ordained in 1659, and who died in 1677; 
and his son Thomas, who after some uncertainty in the matter was, 
three years later, made his successor. The former, in 1672, preached 
the Election Sermon at Boston, — probably the first sermon by a 
Charlestown minister printed in America. An elegy upon his death, 
composed by the Rev. Urian Oakes, was one of the earliest poems com- 
posed and printed in this country. He is said to have been " a very 
holy man, much distinguished for his erudition, his various virtues, and 
winning manners," and also " a watchful guardian of Harvard College." 
Indeed, he was a son worthy of his honored father, the Rev. Thomas 
Shepard of Cambridge Church. Thomas, the third thus named in this 
remarkable family, and the only minister of this church who was bap- 
tized in it, was also distinguished for learning, for piety, and the un- 
usual success of his labors. His salary, it is of interest to note, was 
£100 a year. Unhappily, in 1685, he died, aged only twenty-seven, 
lamented by all. His funeral was attended by the governor and mag- 
istrates, by many of the clergy, and the faculty and students of the 
college. Cotton Mather says he was "^ Son that was the Lively Pic- 
ture of his [father's] Virtues," a " Confirmation to that Observation, 
That as the Snow-Ball, the further it rolls, the greater it grows, thus 
the further that the Grace of God is continued, and received, and 
valued in any Family, the Greater Effects of that Grace will be still 
appearing." 

For a year and five months the church was then without a pastor. 
Various ministers supplied the pulpit ; among them, the Rev. Cotton 



SHEPARD AND MORTON. 183 

Mather preached to the Artillery Company. In July, 168G, the Rev. 
Charles Morton came from England. His family had been of hon- 
orable character for full three hundred years. He was a graduate of 
Oxford, and a scholar widely known. "The Worthily Famous," 
wrote John Dunton, with " Sense Enough for a Privy Counsellour, 
and Soul Great Enough for a King ; " "a person too considerable in 
his Generation, to want any of our commendation," said prominent 
ministers near here. Received with enthusiasm, he was, after about 
four months, installed pastor of this church, in the ministry of which 
he continued eleven and a half years until his death. 

The disturbances arising from the conduct of Governor Andros, 
and the Revolution of 1688, also made Mr. Morton prominent. 
For expressions deemed seditious in his sermon. Lecture Day, 
Sept. 2, 1687, he was prosecuted and acquitted. By some ninety 
years he was a precursor of the patriots of another "glorious 
Revolution." 

To the close of his pastorate, and nearly also of the seventeenth 
century, the number of admissions to the church was 649, and of bap- 
tisms 1675. It is thought that the earliest baptism of an adult was in 
1673. The only marriages recorded by the ministers before the Revo- 
lution were from 1687 to 1697, by Mr. Morton. 

From this time to the end of the Colonial Period the history of the 
church must be briefly sketched. The Rev. Simon Bradstreet, or- 
dained in 1698, was minister for forty-three years, during eight of 
which he was assisted by the Rev. Joseph Stevens, who was ordained 
in 1713, and whose death at the age of thirty-nine was caused by his 
heroic labors among the sick. In 1724 the Rev. Hull Abbot was 
ordained, beginning a pastorate of fifty years. Associated with him 
nearly thirty-five years was the Rev. Thomas Prentice, installed in 
1739. He died, aged eighty, in 1782, after a pastorate of forty-three 
years. All these four were natives of New England, and were gradu- 
ates of Harvard College, — good and true men, faithful and successful 
in their work. 

The number of admissions from 1698 to 1775 was about 954; of 
baptisms, 4,381. The Record from 1632 gives over 7,600 names, 
that must have belonged to nearly 7,000 persons. Among the mem- 
bers of the church esteemed here, and too many to be mentioned now, 
we should, at least, recall some names. General Robert Sedgwick, 
admitted at the end of 1636, was, in 1652, made the highest military 
officer in the colony. In the last two years of his life he served Oliver 
Cromwell. Thomas Graves, from the same ruler, received the title of 



184 THE FIRST CHURCH. 

Admiral.* Francis "Willoughby, an enterprising citizen, was " almost 
constantly " in public office. All these three were merchants. Five 
generations of the Russell family in turn supplied the church and town 
with men who were among the most distinguished in them both. In 
1640 Richard came from Hereford. James, his oldest son, was born 
here in that year. His son Daniel lived till 1763. The fourth was 
James, the son of Daniel, born here in 1715. The last was Thomas, 
second son of James, born 1740. All bore well the title Honorable; 
all were business men or merchants ; all were benefactors of this 
church. The clock upon the gallery bears the name of Thomas Rus- 
sell, who gave it. One sacramental tankard bears initials, probably of 
Richard, who died in 1676. 

In 1686 Judge Samuel Penliallow, the author of the "History of 
the Wars of New England with the Eastern Indians," joined the 
church, and was a member nearly thirty years. In 1703 died Cap- 
tain Richard Sprague, descended from the early settlers of that name. 
He gave money for the ministers, the school, the poor, and for sacra- 
mental plate (two tankards of which now remain), and, chiefly, the old 
parsonage, with house and land. In 1705 the Rev. Timothy Cutler, 
afterwards President of Yale College, and for more than forty years 
the rector of Christ Church in Boston, became a member. The Rev. 
Joseph Lord was brought up here. lie, Feb. 2, 1696, is said to have 
officiated at the first communion in Carolina, near Charleston. The 
Rev. Stephen Badger, missionary to the Natick Indians, also was a 
member. 

The great subjects of the times appear to have been treated in this 
pulpit, as at earlier dates. Thomas Prentice preached on the Reduc- 
tion of Cape Breton, and Hull Abbot on the Scotch Rebellion, both in 
1745. Here the Rev. George Whitofield preached to crowded congrega- 
tions, and the great revival of 1741 ensued, when there were sixty-six 
admissions to the church, — the largest number in any year. The 
chair and Bible that he used are still preserved. 

The place of worship of the church, although close to this spot from 
the beginning, was not permanent till 1639. Then a meeting-house 

^ This church and society not onl}' had distinguished representatives in the great 
Civil War or the public service in England over two centuries ago, but also in the 
great Civil War in the United States. Among those who have been members of 
this church or congregation were Admiral Foote, Admiral Green, Admiral String- 
ham, and Admiral Taylor. Commodore John B. Montgomery was many years a 
member of this church, and the family of Captain Hudson of the Exploring Expe- 
dition was also represented. 



HISTORY TO 1775. 185 

was built upon the hill-slope toward the Square. With vai'ious changes 
it esisted seventy-seven years, and was then replaced by a framed build- 
ing with a steeple, that was burned upon the 17th of June, 1775. So 
far as now appears, it was a wooden structure, in the general style of 
the old meeting-houses in this region. In the claims for losses it was 
valued at £3,000. (See pp. 115, 174) 

The material things remaining from the times before the Revolu- 
tion, and associated with the church, are small and few, but their 
value is thus made the greater. 

The original Church Record from 1632, kept by Elder Green, and 
after him by the successive ministers to 1768, is carefully preserved. 
Its contents have been printed, three quarters in the Historic-Genea- 
logical Register, and all in a large quarto volume, copies of which have 
been placed in various libraries. Every name and statement in the 
Records will be found there. Several pieces of communion-service 
also still remain. The tomb in which the ministers were buried stands 
in the old graveyard of the town, and has been marked anew. (See 
p. 78.) Some of their discourses have been printed, but copies have 
been seldom seen here in this century. Some manuscripts of sermons 
are preserved. Nineteen, preached by the Rev. Thomas Shepard (2d), 
in 1668 and 1669, are owned by the American Antiquarian Society. 

The spring of 1775 brought its peculiar trials to the town and church. 
A great alarm was caused in April, when the royal troops returned 
from Lexington, and many of the people left their homes. The father 
of good Deacon Miller was then killed. Removals, both of families 
and property, continued, so that by the middle of the month of June 
about two hundred persons only were left in the town east of the neck. 
Upon the 17th of June a large part of the members of the church and 
congregation lost their houses and much other property in the great 
conflagration.^ The patriotic Deacon Miller, with his gun, went up to 
Bunker Hill and did good service. The Records of the church state 
that more than three hundred and eighty buildings were destroyed, and 
that two thousand persons were " reduced from affluence and medioc- 
rity to the most aggrivated exile." The endurance of the people was 
severely tried, but, in the words of a rare poem of the time, — 

" Not Charlestown's flame that spiring high arose ; 
Nor all the smoke that aided to oppose ; 
Could shake the firmness of Columbia's Band, 
To yield submissive the adjacent land." 

^ This is very fully described on pages 8-14 and 114-174. 



186 DESTRUCTION AND REBUILDING. 

After the town was burned, and after hostile troops had left it, some 
of those who had been living here returned. The jilace was dreary. 
Grass, indeed, was growing green on Bunker's and Breed's Hills ; but 
all around the Town Hill and the Square, and streets near by, were 
ruins of their homes. The dwellings of the dead upon the Burial Hill 
alone seemed to have been spared. 

When first the town was built the forests grew around in wildness, 
yet in peace and beauty ; but when the rebuilding was begun, the re- 
cent havoc of a cruel war, and dismal evidence of trying loss, everywhere 
confronted the builders. A memorial informs us that in 1777 "the 
returning inhabitants in their distressed situations " at once provided a 
place of worship. They " found no other or better than an old block- 
house left by the British troops upon Town Hill." This building was 
used for the town and school-house, and the meeting-house, for half a 
dozen years. The Record states that " the first administration of the 
Lord's Supper in Charlestown, since the destruction by the crudest 
British Enemy, was Nov. 8, 1778, with great solemnity, and fulness of 
members beyond expectation." The venerable Thomas Prentice con- 
ducted the services. The scene was one, indeed, of the most solemn 
and most touching ever witnessed in this old historic town. 

In this block-house, Sept. 4, 1780, the townspeople first voted for 
magistrates under the new State Constitution. There were forty-eight 
votes. On Oct. 27, 1782, the town voted to convey to the First 
Parish in it the Town-House Hill, for the purpose of erecting thereon 
a meeting-house, within five years. 

In the next year, 1783, the meeting-house required was built upon 
the present site. It was 72 feet long and 52 feet wide, a wooden 
structure, with a steeple 162 feet high, designed by Charles Bulfinch. 
The front lot on the Square, the former site, appears to have become 
private property at about this time. The bell was presented by Cham- 
pion, Dickason, and Burgis, merchants of London. It has since been 
broken and recast, — once by Paul Revere, — was claimed by the town 
for town uses, delivered to it by the parish, and finally became private 
property by purchase. It now hangs in the tower, where the parish 
has the use of it while the parish does not change its past religious 
faith. 

No minister was settled here until tlie 10th of January, 1787. The 
Rev. Joshua Paine, Jr., who had been unanimously called, was minister 
about a year, when he died at the age of twenty-five. His piety and 
social virtues were esteemed. " His remains," a record states, " were 
decently and respectfully entombed at the expense of the parish, March 



THE TOWN IN 1775. 187 

1st, 1788." He was the last minister who died in office in this church, 
and was buried by it. 

In November, 1788, the Rev. Jedidiah Morse was unanimously called 
to the pastorate, and on April 30, 1789, he was installed. His min- 
istry of thirty years extended through a period marked by the change 
of thought and modes, both in religious and political affairs, that took 
place under our new institutions. He not only was the pastor of this 
church, but was also prominent in various public matters, and in the 
early literature of the nation. Five years before he came he published 
at New Haven his " Geography made Easy," said to be the first ge- 
ography j^ublished in this country. In 1789 his larger work, "The 
American Geography," appeared at Elizabethtown. Each of these 
works passed several editions, and began a series of like publications, 
that his sons continued. Altogether several hundred thousand copies 
were issued by this family in sixty years. The various other works 
by Dr. Morse were numerous. Plis Gazetteer is an important, and per- 
haps unrivalled, " picture of what this country was " immediately after 
the Revolution. The maps and the Reports on Indians that he pub- 
lished, cannot be dispensed with in the illustrations of the early na- 
tional history and art. Some of his works received the honor of 
reprint in British cities, some of translation, and some were thought 
worth stealing. 

In 1802 Dr. Morse, assisted by members of this parish, issued nine- 
teen religious tracts, "of which 32,600 copies were circulated." His 
son states that " there can be little doubt that, in 1802, the pastor and 
people of the First Parish in Charlestown had done more in circulating 
religious tracts among the poor and destitute in the United States than 
any other people in New England." 

To one man alone belongs a greater honor. He was, in his time, a 
chief supporter of this church, and of him it is stated : " Richard Devens, 
Esq., of Charlestown, had no equal in America in this benevolence. 
For him [were] printed more than 100,000 tracts for gratuitous distri- 
bution." He died in 1807, aged eighty-six, full of years and honors. 

On the day Dr. Morse was installed there were 135 church-members, 
— 43 men and 92 women, — of whom 40 were widows. On June 1, 
1800, the total number was 143. Until this year the First Church had 
been substantially the one church of the town. In 1800 the First 
Baptist Church was organized, and May 12, 1801, its meeting-house 
was opened. Dr. Morse made an address, and Oliver Holden wrote 
the music for an anthem. In 1800 the town had 2,751 inhabitants 
and 349 houses. Both of these numbers gradually increased. 



188 THE FIEST CHUECH. 

In 1803 the growth of the population of the town made necessary 
an enlargement of the meeting-house, and 15 feet were added on each 
side. There were then 162 pews, of which 92 were held by the pa- 
rishioners. In 1806, June 10, the number of church-members had 
increased to 235, of whom 171 were women. There were 40 widows, 
as in 1789. Within a few years the navy -yard and prison were es- 
tablished, and the general business of the town increased. In 1810 
the Universalist Society built its meeting-house, and gathered there 
some both of the older and the later inhabitants, and some who were 
not parishioners or members of this church. In 1815 Dr. Morse, with 
his son Sidney E., and N. Willis, established the " Boston Recorder," 
said to be the first religious newspaper ever published in this country.^ 

The effects of the last war with England were severe in this vicinity. 
In 1815 the town, that then contained about five thousand people, was 
recovering from them. There were here a dozen or more professional 
men, seven or eight school-teachers, and an artist, James Frothingham. 
The community was active and intelligent. Differing beliefs in politics 
and in religion had grown with the institutions of the young republic, 
and these last were showing their effect upon the various divisions of 
the people. The benevolent operations, and what might be called the 
Charlestown literature of the period, show that good work was done by 
every class. There was strong feeling then on several subjects, that 
affected even families, and there was change by death and by removal. 
Some old names came to be borne by but few persons, or to be upon 
opposing sides. A notable division had for years been growing up 
among the Congregationalists in this region, and, 1815-17, it extended 
to this town, and here resulted in the formation of the Second Congre- 
gational Society, that, in 1837, was called the Harvard Church. A 
majority — a very large one in the church — remained in the First 
Church and Parish. The latter lost a valuable minority. Among 
those who remained members of the First Church at this period were 
Jeremiah Evarts, — one of the most distinguished philanthropists at 
that time in the country, and father of Hon. Wm. M. Evarts, — and 

1 So says the Rev. John Todd, D.D., a member of the First Cliurch (in Sprague's 
Life of Dr. M., p. 313). " The Cliristian History," published weekly " for T. Prince, 
jmir.," — No. 1., Saturday, March 5, 1743, andsometime continued, — is claimed as 
the first religious newspaper in the world, which naturally includes this country 
(see Arch. Amer., Am. Antiq. Soc, V. 107). Competing for the distinction is 
"The Herald of Gospel Libertj%" published at Portsmouth, N. H., eveiy other 
Thursday evening, by Elias Smith, — No. 1, Sept. 1, 1808. No. 44 (Friday, April 
27, 1810), was issued at Portland, Me. Smith's name is dropped after Vol. I., and 
Vol. III. No. 75 is dated Friday, July 5, 1811, at Philadelphia, Penn. 



HISTORY, 1819-1870. 189 

Samuel Finley Breese Morse, artist and inventor, the only native of 
the town, it is thought, who received national honors at his death; 
his foreign decorations also were remarkable. 

In 1819 Dr. Morse resigned the pastorate, and was succeeded by the 
Rev. Warren Fay, who was installed on Feb. 23, 1820. In that year 
the Methodist Religious Society in Charlestown was incorporated. 

Another large division of the Congregationalists came in 1832, 
when, December 27, thirty-four ^ persons — about double the number of 
church-members who originally joined the Second Church — were dis- 
missed from the First Church, and formed the Third, or Winthrop 
Church. The First Church has supplied members to perhaps every 
other religious organization in the town, and to several churches in 
other places ; but this appears to be the largest body that has gone 
from it to any one of them. At the end of 1835, however, the number 
of its communicants was 271, of whom 79 were admitted by Dr. Morse. 

On April 22, 1840, the Rev. Wm. Ives Budington was ordained 
pastor, eight months after Dr. Fay had left. This year, 1840, was 
the annus mirabiUs of the ministry in Charlestown, for then came 
here three ministers, each to be pre-eminent in his denomination, — 
Dr. Ellis, Dr. Chapin, Dr. Budington. Dr. Budington, as he told the 
speaker near the close of his life, came here with all his young enthu- 
siasm to devote himself to this old church. Within three years he, in 
nine lectures, told its history, that was printed, and that is among the 
earlier productions in its class. His work bears testing, and has liter- 
ary character that was soon acknowledged. A few years later, after 
he returned from his first tour in Europe, he conceived the project of 
remodelling the meeting-house. 

The wooden edifice of 1783 became decayed, and was replaced by 
a brick building, dedicated 1834, — the one in which we meet.^ The 
style was then thought classic. The interior was square and plain. 
The ceiling, low and nearly flat, was whitewashed, and the walls were 
yellow. Mr. Alexander R. Esty supplied designs, and the existing 
form and aspect were given to this building. The interior was the 
first in town to show some of the more established lines of Christian 
art, ecclesiastical in character. The plain hall of the meetiug-house, 
known for two centuries, became the nave known for a thousand years. 
In 1868 Miss Charlotte Harris, then of Boston, gave sixteen bells, now 
in the tower of this meeting-house, and called the Harris Chime. She 
wrote : " My ancestors, Harris and Devens, were for a great number 

1 January 7, 1833, one more was added. 

' The meeting-houses are more fully described on pages 50 to 59. 



190 THE FIRST CHURCH. 

of years inhabitants of Charlestown, and worshipped in the church of 
the First Parish." On this account, as also from interest in this soci- 
ety and its pastor, Rev. J. B. Miles, she gave the chime, then one of 
the largest in the country. In 1870 the present coloring of the inte- 
rior was applied, with some of its significance in early art, and its 
expression of religious teaching. Over all the congregation, in the 
nave, — the Latin navis, that great ship of the church in which we all 
are carried through the storms of life to the celestial haven, — was 
spread deep blue, the emblem of the peace of heaven. Upon the wall, 
before the people, is the gray, expressive of humility. And from the 
language in which the apostles wrote are taken letters joined as they 
once were upon the tombs of the first martyrs, and here written in 
bright gold, the emblem of celestial glory, to tell the name, above all 
other names, before which every knee shall bow, — the Christos, Alpha 
and Omega of the church's faith. 

The pastorate of Dr. Budington closed July 24, 1854, and Rev. 
James B. Miles succeeded him on Jan. 2, 1855. In 1856 the number 
of church-members living was 297. The faithful services of Mr. Miles 
were closed Sept. 30, 1871, when he went to a work, wide as the 
world, that placed his name in honorable prominence among those who 
have labored for the spread of peace and of good-will. His sudden 
death occurred Nov. 13, 1875. Dr. Budington died Nov. 29, 1879, 
at Brooklyn, where he had been pastor of the large church on Clinton 
Avenue for more than twenty years. Charitable towards all, learned, 
eloquent, chivalrous, and courteous, devoted to the highest require- 
ments of his sacred office, he lived and died a true Christian gentleman 
and teacher. Thus, within a few years, both these long-endeared and 
valued pastors of this ancient church have, in their turn, been numbered 
with the many faithful and lamented ministers whom they so worthily 
succeeded. And at these latest deaths of pastors and of friends we 
look back on the past, and view the present of the four-hilled town. 
For we who live here now may well think of the deep significance 
that changing times at length have given to the four hills that stand on 
the diminished territory we still call by its old name. 

On this hill many of the Fathers of New England did their portion 
of the labor in the founding of our institutions ; on a second stands a 
monument that testifies their strong devotion to sound learning ; on a 
third there is a lofty spire bearing the name of the great bishop of 
Geneva, famed for '* all-embracing charity ; " upon the fourth is that 
grand obelisk which tells the meaning of the Revolution. 

We are all here to live, — each with individual belief and sense of 



TOWN HILL, CHAKLESTOWN. 191 

duty, all in peace and quietness. And here we daily see the four hills 
of the town with their impressive lessons, — of the open Bible, of 
sound learning. Christian charity, and civil freedom. May they never 
teach less to the people here, and always may there be around them 
benedictions on the " Church of God in Charlestown." 

Church history, important as it is, is not all that is associated with 
the Town Hill, Charlestown. The writer gave a brief but comprehen- 
sive sketch of more than the preceding subject might require, in a 
long article entitled "An American Shrine," that first appeared in 
the New England Historic-Genealogical Register (Vol. XXIV., July, 
1870), a part of which may properly be added here. 

As early as 1G29, when the shore of the "Bay of Massachusetts" 
was an almost unbroken wilderness, the strongest settlement yet made 
upon it was around this hill ; and on its summit was built, under di- 
rection of Mr. Graves, a defensive work called the " Hill Fort, with 
pallisadoes and flankers," — during more than forty years the chief 
structure there, and necessary for the protection of the settlers. Again, 
in 1675-76, during Philip's War, the most trying in which Colonial 
Massachusetts engaged, and when hostilities were committed by Indi- 
ans within a few miles distance, this fort appears to have been again 
put in defensive order. On the hill, for several years, was the first 
burial-place of the town, where many of the earliest settlers were in- 
terred, until about 1640, when the still existing Old Burial Ground, 
about an eighth of a mile distant, was used. (See p. 74.) In 1635 
Robert Hawkins built a mill upon the hill, and hence it was for a long 
time called Windmill Hill. In 1648 the earliest (?) schoolhouse of 
the town " was ordered to be built [here] and paid for by a ' general 
rate.' " Since that date a public school has been maintained almost 
uninterruptedly near the summit, to provide education for the practice 
of civil government, the local seat of which has been, from the very 
beginning of civilization on the Bay, almost continuously at the base. 
The time when school or court or town-house were removed was when 
the town became the first great material sacrifice for American Inde- 
pendence. And as the town grew first around this hill, so also it 
arose there from its ruin to new life. 

Beneath the Charlestown Oak, that grew upon the easterly slope, 
was held the first worship of the church, and all the places for that 
worship since have been upon the summit, or seventy yards from it, 
upon one of the sides, or, when in the Great House, only about one 
hundred yards from it. 



192 AN AMERICAN SHRINE. 

No other hill throughout New England, except the hallowed Burial 
Hill at Plymouth, has a longer or more suggestive history, and none 
has one more varied. These two hills have also a peculiar historic 
resemblance. Each bore the first permanent and important civilized 
eettlement on its respective bay. On both was a fortification, neces- 
sary for defence against Indians, during many years after the begin- 
ning of colonization upon and around them. On both were buried 
some of the earliest settlers in the region. At the base of both the 
Puritan faith was long maintained in churches founded by members 
of its earliest arrived representatives. . . . 

Certainly, if in America there are few spots that have become in- 
vested with long, continuous, varied, and interesting historical associ- 
ations, we may be permitted to feel that this hill is one of the spots 
thus ennobled. In " the forest primeval " of oaks that grew on it, the 
first Christian settlers made homes. On its summit they built a defence 
against savage tribes close around them. On its slopes they assembled 
in prayer and thanksgiving and fasting, and there they showed that 
strength of material resources should be joined with devotion of soul, 
and iu the New World establish a nation for Christ. And in its stern 
drift, when their griefs and their labors were ended, were laid their 
mortal remains to await the upbuilding on earth of the city not made 
with human hands. True, indeed, " were they in their time, and . . . 
God them defended." And those who in later time enter upon the 
precious inheritance their endeavors secured, and who can see and 
enjoy the blessings it brings, may well guard and honor this ground 
that bears consecration by them and by virtues of many generations ; 
for its history is not alone of one local body, of one small town, or of 
one great sect, but a history rendering this low mound of earth a me- 
morial spot of a mighty nation. 

With reverence we visit the old English Canterbury or Scottish 
lona, the Roman Janiculum or Capitoline Mount, sites where the 
Christianity of nations was — by a chosen few — founded in sorrow, 
and yet in hope, to grow and spread through great communities that 
gathered around them. 

And this historical and time-honored Town Hill is truly a Canter- 
bury, an lona, not alone of the " Church of God in Charlestown," but 
of the broader church of the great American Republic ; and both of 
church and of civil institutions, and of varied history and of noble 
virtues and labors, we well may esteem it and name it 

An American Shrine. 



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EECORDS OF THE FIRST CHURCH. 193 



RECORDS OF THE FIRST CHURCH. 

These, kept by the ministers who were not only the best educated 
men in the town, but who were also thoroughly acquainted with every- 
body, supply a great amount of reliable matter about the townspeople, 
and are of special value. As only portions had been printed, the 
writer thought that the whole of the earlier record should be repro- 
duced in type, and, as already stated, a large amount appeared in the 
New England Historic-Genealogical Register (1869-79). This, with 
a good deal more, including all extant from 1632 to 1789, he issued in 
a quarto volume, copies of which he has placed in libraries. On the 
following pages, Admissions to the Church, Baptisms, Marriages, and 
Deaths, from 1789 to 1832, are printed for the first time. The book 
containing them had a narrow escape before it came into his hands, 
and the value of its contents, saved here in type from possible future 
loss, becomes more evident when it is remembered that this is for much 
of the time named the only extant church record of the town, and also 
since it is said that the corresponding records of the town for much of 
the time are either imperfect or are only compilations (with mistakes). 
Dr. Morse, who kept until 1820 what is here given, was, furthermore, 
both the most prominent author and the most competent man in the 
place. Nothing more, however, than mention needs to be made in re- 
gard to the relative and actual importance of records of original entry. 

With his own hand the writer has copied two full centuries of the 
ministers' records, and having seen them printed and put in accessible 
form, he feels that he has done his share. It is proper to add that he 
has read the proofs of the whole from the original manuscripts. 



[p. 300 of the Record.] [300] 

Names of Persons admitted to full | Communion in the Church in 
Charlestown since the 1^' day of May, 1789. — 
1789. [Rev. Jed. Morse was Installed April 30, 1789.] 

April. Jedidiah Morse of the Chh. of Yal. Coll. New" 

Haven, and his Wife, 
Aug. 9. Elisabeth Ann Morse of the Presbyterian Chh. 

in Shrewsbury, New Jersey. j 

" 9. Jonathan KetteU,%ih\s\N\le, 

" 9. Hepzihah Kettell. 

" 9. William Holmes Manning. Dismifsed at his) 

request, Oct. 7, 1803, & his Wife, [• Manning. 

Oct. 11. Mary Manning. ) 

13 



Morse. 



KetteU. 



194 



EECOEDS OF THE FLEST CHURCH. 



Nov. 8. 



Dec. 13. 
1790. 
April 11. 

June 13. 



Sarah Kettell, "Widow. 



Kettell. 



Lemuel Shcphard, excommunicated Aug^ 1816, ) s}ieriVjaj.d 



Augt 8. 
Sep*. 12'>. 
Nov'. 14"^. 

1791. 
January 9"^. 

June 12"'. 

Dec. ISt". 
1792. 
Jan^ 8. 
Feby 12*. 
April 7*. 

May 13. 
June lO"*. 
Voted to re- 
ceive these 
persons into 
w"' the Chh. 



& Henrietta Skephard, his Wife 

Catharine Rayner, Widow. 

Total No. 10. Males, 4 ; Females, 6. 

Anne Whittemore (fince Mrs. Swan). 

Elisabeth Lamfon. 

David Wood, Jr., his Wife, 

Margaret Wood, & their daughter, 

Peggy Wood (fince ]\Irs. Dean). Dismifsed& 
reccommended to the Chh. in Exeter, July 
13, 1811. 

Phebe Dexter, wife of Nathan Dexter. 

Susan Bayard Breefe, Daughter of Sam" 
Breese, Esq., of Shrewsbury, N. Jersey. 
Dismissed to y" chh. in Sackett's Har- 
bor, at her request, Aug. 7, 1817. (Since 
Mrs. Snowden.) 

Hannah Mallet, Wife of Isaac Mallet. 

Elisabeth Bispliam, Widow. 

Joanna Swan, admitted at her Father's house 
on acc't of sicknefs. 

Chh. Members. 

Polly Kettell. 

Sukey Manning. 

Sarah Harris (widow). 

Margaret Center, wife of Cotton Center. 

Mai-y Hadley, Wife of Moses Hadley. 

Total, 15. IMales, 1; Females, 14. 
Lois Woodtrard, W'iie of Sam'.' Woodward. 
Ann Dowse, Wife of Nalh" Dowse. 
Mary Hays, since Mrs. Boylston, died Jan^ 2, 

'49. [Note by W. I. B.j 
Nancy Coggsicell. 
Aaron Putnam, \ Husband 
Rebecca Putnam, ) & Wife. 
Sally Putnam, Sister, 
fellowship and communion 
at Charlestown. 



Kayner. 

Whittemore. 
Lamfon. 



Wood. 



Difmifsed from, ^ 
& reccommend 
by, the chh. at 
]\Iedford under 
the Pastoral 
care of Mr. D. 
Osgood. 



July S'h. 
Aug* 12"^. 
1793. 
Jany 13"^. 



Aynos Tufts, } Husband 
Deborah Tufts, S & Wife. 

Total, 9. INIalcs, 2 ; Females, 7. 
Rebecca Burdit, now ]Mrs. Barker. 



Dexter. 
Breese. 



]\Iallet. 

Bispham. 

Swan. 

[301] 
Kettell. 
Manning. 
Harris. 
Center, 
Hadley. 

Woodward. 

Dowse. 

Hays. 

Cogswell. 



-Putnam. 

Tufts. 
Burdit. 



ADMISSIONS, FULL COMMUNION. 195 

Grace Hard, dismifsed to 2d. clih.i Ilurd. 

27. Hepzibah Mansir, AVife of Sam'. Mansir, ad- > 

mitted at her own house on acc^ of Sicknefs. > Mansir. 
Feb. 10">. Abigail Butmau, Wife of Matthew Butuian. Butinan. 
May 12. David Barker. Barker. 

June 9'^. Rhoda Hooper, Wife of Thomas Hooper. Hooper. 

Poll// Harringlon (since Mrs. Duncklee (?). Harrington, 

dismifsed to Polly Hurd, ? Daughters of Benjv Hurd & ) Hurd. 
2d. chh. in Hannah Hurd, S since Mrs. Skinner.^ Wife. ) 
Charlestown.i 

1793. CiiH. Membeijs. [302] 
July 14"». Mary Fosdick, Wife of David Fosdick. Nov. Fosdick. 

10, 1808 Dismifsed. 
Oct. 13. Catharine Slimpson, Wife of Wm. Stimpson. Stimpson. 

Thomas Brown, & Wife, } Belonging to the "] 
Hannah Brown, ) 1^* and 2'* Chh's in j 

Reading — Dismifsed from & reccommended > Brown, 
by s'l Chh's & admitted to the Chh. in 
Charlestown. J 

Nov. 10"^. Susannah Richardson. Richardson. 

1794. Total, 14. Males, 2; Females, 12. 
Jan^ 5. Ann Kidder, Widow of Isaac Kidder, deceased ) 

(reccommended from Brattle ftreet chh. r Kidder. 
Boston). ^ 

Phebe Sweetser, Widow of Henry P. Sweetser, ^ 

deceased. Member of the Chh. in Maiden. >• Sweetser. 
Difmifsed & recommended by s'? Chh. ) 

Mar. 9"". Sally Farnsworth, Wife of Jacob Farnf worth. Farnsworth. 

Marcy Edmunds, Wife of David Edmunds, Jr. Edmunds. 
April 13. Ttmo^^ [FaZ^er, & his W^ife, ) members of y^"] 
Ahiyail Walker. ) Chh. inMedford I 

— dismifsed & recommended by s'^ chh. j ''^^^^r. 
Mar. 23, 1794. Dismifsed Mar., 1817. j 
May U*. Elisabeth Stevens, 'Widow of W™ W. Stevens. Stevens. 
Lydia Dunklee, Wife of John P. Dunklee, ■) 

& her Sister, C I^unklee. 

Sarah Mead, died June, 1794. ) ^^^^**- 

Members of y* Chh. in Medford; Difmif-J & 
reccommended by s"' Chh. May 4, 1794. 
July 13. Ruthy Payson, Wife of PhiUips Payson. Payson. 

1 May 7, 1818, the First Church "Voted, That the connection of the Sisters 
above named, with this Chh. be at their retxuest, dissolved — this dissolution to 
take place when they shall be united with any other Chh. — & that they bo de- 
clared to be in regular & good standing in this Chh." This was the usual form of 
vote under which members went to the 2d church. 



196 EECOEDS OF THE FIEST CHURCH. 

Aug' 10. Nehemiah Holden,8i Wife,} 'Members of ye") 



Holden. 



Kimball. 

Becham. 
Lampson. 

Paine. 

Hay. 

Moor. 



Elisabeth Holden. ) Chh. at Pepperell, 

— difmifsed & recommended by s<i Chh. [ 

July 31, 1794. J 

Total, 12. Males, 2 ; Females, 10. 

1795. /member of y« 2^ Chh. in 

July 12. Abigail Kimball, } Boston, difmifsed & recom- 

( mended by D^ Lathrop. 

Sally Becham of Maiden, now Mrs. Gardner. 

Nov. 8. Joanna Lampson, Wife of Amos Lampson. 

Nov. 10, 1808, Difmifsed. 

Mary Paine. 

Ann Hay (widow of Rich? Hay, now Mrs. Bailey). 

ixr 1. i,T C Brothers, children of Wm. & 
Walter Moor, \ ^^ , \. .^^ . . ^ 
r,,. ,, < Hannah Moor (Union in Con- 
Pun v il/oor, J ^. ,^ 
v necticut). 

1795. Church Members. [303] 
Dec. 13. Esther Frothln(jhain,* \ Dismifsed to y^ Chh. at 

Sally Frothingham,^ ) Dartmouth, Jan?^, 1808. 

(* Since INIrs. Emerson.) (f Since Mrs. 

Sweetser.) Daughtersof Benj. Frothingham. Frothingham. 
Elisabeth Fe/senden. Fefsenden. 

Oliver Brown. Dismissed to the Chh. in Kingston. Brown. 

1796. Total 11. 8 Females. 

March 13. Joshua Hooper. Excommunicated Aug., 1816. Hooper. 

April 10. Jonathan Call, k\N\ie,} ^ C 11 

Sarah Call [died Jan-- i 15, '49 [W. I. B.]. \ ^ ' 

May 8. Hannah Frothingham, D. of Benj"} Frothingham. Frothingham. 

June 12. Andrew Woodbury Duly, &.Vt lie, > y. . 

Mary Duty, now jNIrs. Richardson. ) Difmifsed. ^ ^' 
Sally Munroe, since IMrs. Phillips, excommuni- Munroe. 
cated Aug., 1816. 

Aug* 14"'. Abial Larlin, AVife of Saml Larkin. Larkin. 

Sep. 11. Samuel Stcan, fen'. Swan. 

Oct. 9. Elisabeth Taylor, Wife of W"? Taylor. Taylor. 

1797. Total, 10. 6 females. 

Mar. 12. Rebecca Turner, Wife of Barnabas Turner, Turner. 

died Dec. 31,18.51, c^.GOyrs. [noteby W.I.B.]. 
Aug* 13. Elizabeth Miller, Wife of Dr. Tho's Miller, dis- \ 

mifsed from & recommended by the O. S. >- INIiller. 

Chh. Boston. ) 

Nov. 12. Esther Carter, "NA'ife of John Carter, Jun^ Carter. 

1798. Excommunicated Aug., 1810. 

Mar. 11. Ann Bedwood Rhodes, Wife of Dan' Rhodes. Rhodes. 
Dismifsed to Old South. 
Ruthy Wilhelmina Barrel, now l^Irs. Snow. Barrel. 



H 



1 



ADMISSIONS, FULL COMMUNION. 



197 



1799. Chh. Members. [304] 

Feby 10. Polly Hooper. 

lilay 12. Joseph Parker, & his Wife, ) Dis. to Methodist 

Margaret Parker. ) chh. 

Aug*. 11. Joseph Brown, & his wife, "] Dismifsed from the 
Mary Brown; 'Chh. in Lynnfield 

Nicholas Brown,?i.h.iS'<fiilQ, i & recommended 
Maheiahel Broion. J to the Chh. in 

Charlestown, July 15, 1799, & rec^ by vote 

of y« Chh. Aug. 11, 1799. 
James Frothinyham, & Wife, 
Sarah Frothinyham. Dismifsed Oct. 7**, 1803, 

at her request. 
Hannah Hopkins. 

William Wiley, khis Wife, \ Dismifsed from the 
Hannah Wiley. ) Chh. in Reading, & 

recommended to the Chh. in Charlestown, & 

rec"! by Vote of the Chh. 
Sarah Clarke (Widow). 
Susaniiah Wallace, Do. 

, Joseph Brown, & Wife, ) Difmifsed from the 
Sarah Brown. ) Chh. at Lynnfield, & 

recommended to the Chh. at Charlestown, 

Oct. 2, 1800, & rec'i by vote of y« Chh. Jan. 

11, 1801. 
Sally Wood, now Mrs. Stone. Dismissed. 
John Austin, } 

Hannah Austin, » since Mrs. Treddwell. 
David Vose, at Hampden, Maine. 
Sally Ru/sell, }_ dismifsed March, 1817. 
Mary Ru/sell, ) 

Rebecca Henley, since ]\Irs. Soley. 
Elisabeth Soley, Wife of Sam'. Soley. 
Catharine Henley. 
Ann Jones, AVife of EbenT Jones. 

Church Members. [305] 

Thomas Cotton Hayward, \ Husband & Wife. Hay ward. 
Elisabeth Hayward.* S ]\Iembers of the 

Chh's in Pom fret & Brooklyn (Con.) ; dif- 

mifed from & recommended by s"^ Chh's to 

the Chh. in Charlestown. * Difmifsed June, 

1812, to Rev. Mr. Channing's chh. 
26. Sarah Newhall, Wife of Naphtali Newhall. Newhall. 

Aug. 9. Afary Bradstreet. Bradstreet. 

Oct. 11. Hannah Adams, Wife of Nathan Adams, died Adams. 

Jany 26, 1842. [W. I. B.] 



1800. 
Jan? 12. 

April 13. 
June 8. 



July 12. 
Nov. 9. 
1801, Jan? 11 



Feb. 8. 
Mar. 8. 

April 12. 
May 10. 



June 14. 
July 5. 

1801. 
July m\ 



Hooper. 
Parker. 

Brown. 



Frothingham. 

Hopkins. 
Wiley. 



Clarke. 
Wallace. 

Brown. 



Wood. 

Austin. 

Vose. 

Rufsell. 

Henley. 
Soley. 
Henley. 
Jones. 



198 



RECOKDS OF THE FIRST CHURCH. 



Oct. 16. 

1802. 
May 9. 



Aug. 8. 
Nov. 14. 



Dec. 12. 



1803. 
Jan^ 9. 
Feb. 13. 

Mar. 13. 

1803. 
Apr. 10. 

Sept 11. 



Oct. 9. 
Nov. 13. 
1804. 
Jan. 8. 
Mar. 11. 



April 8. 



Eunice Eand, "Widow. 

Susan7iah Williams, Wife of Isaac (now Haven). 
Mary Fosdlcl; daughter of David Fosdick, 
dismifsed at her request Aug. 11, 1803. 

Giles Alexander, i^^^"^^^^ °^ ^^- Lathrop's 
1 Cull. Boston — recommended 

& admitted, & fince excommunicated [Apr. 

7, 1811]. 
Amos Haggett, dismifsed at his request, 180.'5. 
James Warren, & his wife, 
Anne Warren. 

Susannah Kettell, the wife, & 
Susannah Kettell, the daughter of Andrew. 
Mary Haswell, wife of Capt. Robert Haswell. 
Sarah Thompson, widow, now Mrs. Jenkins. 
Ann Cabot Lowell, 
Sarah Champney Lowell, 
Susanna Lowell, now fMrs. S. Gorham. 

Elisabeth Cutts Lowell, J now Mrs. Dutton. 
Sarah Rufsell, now Mrs. Sullivan [" deranged " 

in pencil] . 
Daniel Leman, & his wife, 7 Dismifsed to the 
Margarett Leman. ) Baptist Chh. 

Hannah Manning. 
Sarah Millar. 
Jonathan Nicholls (negro). 

Church Members. 
Hannah Siceetser, Wife of Caleb Sweetser. 
Abigail Brazier. Difmifsed at her request. 
Ebenezer Rockwood. Difmifed at his request 

to Rev. Mr. Channing's Chh. Nov. 9, 1809. 
Eleazer Hoicard. 

Ruth Parker (widow of Daniel Parker. 
Sahra Lapham, widow. 
Abigail Rand, Do. 

John Murrag, difmifed at his request, 1805. 
Elias Phinney, dismifsed to the Chh. at 

Thomastown (Me.), Feb? 12, 1808. Since 

returned & dismifsed ag" May 8, 1817. 
Enoch Hunt. 
Ashnr Adams. Dismissed to Park Street 

Church, Boston. [W. Fay.] 
Isaac Warren, & his AVife, ) From the chh. in 
Elisabeth Warren. ) Medford. 

Pollg Goodwin, Wife of John Goodwin. 
Catharine Goodwin, Wife of Edward Goodwin, 

dismifsed at her request. 



Rand. 

Williams. 

Fosdick. 

Alexander. 

Haggett. 
Warren. 

Kettell. 

Haswell. 

Thompson. 

Lowell. 
Rufsell. 

Leman. 

Manning. 

IMillar. 

Nicholls. 

[303] 
Sweetser. 
Brazier. 
Rockwood. 

Howard. 

Parker. 

Lapham. 

Rand. 

Murray. 

Phinney. 

Hunt. 
Adams. 

Warren. 

Goodwin. 
Goodwin. 



ADMISSIONS, FULL COMMUNION. 



199 



Hannah Hurd, > Dismifs'd to the Chh. in Ports. 

Rutli Hurd, ) Childrea of Joseph Hurd. 
May 13. Mahelahel Raymond, Wife of Bart^^ Raymond. 

Hannah Center-, Wife of Rowland Center. 

Thomas Boylston. 

Samuel Elheridge, & Wife, \ 

Lydia Etheridge. ) 

Francis Hyde, & Wife, > Dismifsed to a Church 

Mahetabel Hyde. > in Baltimore. 

Joseph Reed, &AVife, ) 

Elisabeth Reed. Dis i missed to the Hanover 
chh. Boston. 

Matthew Skelton, & Wife, \_ Dismissed to Win- 
Pamela Skelton. ) throp chh. March 
7, 1833 [W. F.]. 

Hannah Newell. 

Gera Jenlcins. 

Elisabeth Devens, ) Nov. 21, 1803. 

Mary Devens. } Difmifsed. 
1804. Church Members. 

May 13. Peggy Wheelock, Wife of Phineas Wheelock, 

from the Chh. in Peterborough. 
June 10. Polly Holman, AVife of John Holman. 

Leah Wade, Wife of Ebenr Wade. 

Richard Boylston, Dismifsed Mar. 5, 1818. 

Ann Rogers, Widow. 

John Edmands, & Wife, 7 Nov. 10, 1808. 

Mary Edmands. > Difmifsed. 

Esther Kettell. Now Mrs. Hunt. 
July 8"» Elisabeth Abraham. 

Mary Tufts, Wife of Nathan Tufts, dismifsed 
Apr., 1817. 

David Stetson, & Wife, ) Dismissed to 2"^ Con- 

Sarah Stetson. ) gregational Church. 

Josiah Harris, & Wife, Nov. 10, 1808. 

Maria Harris. Difmifs*'. 

Aug*. 12. Elisabeth Newell. 

Abigail Goodwin, wife of W?' Goodwin. 

Mary Lewis, wife of W" Lewis. 

Rebecca Lark in. 

Ruth Childs, Wife of Amariah Childs. 

Louisa Payson, wife of John P Payson. 

Elisabeth Barker. Nov. 10, 1808. Dismifsed. 

Sophia Oliver Larkin. Dismifsed to 3'^ Bap- 
tist chh. in Boston. 

Erastus Flint (dismifs'' to Mr. Flint's chh., 
Hartford, June 9, 1808. 



Hurd. 

Raymond. 

Center. 

Boylston. 

Etheridge. 

Hyde. 

Reed. 



Skelton. 

Newell. 
Jenkins. 

Devens. 

[307] 

f Wheelock. 

Holman. 
Wade. 
Boylston. 
Rogers. 

r Edmands. 

Kettell. 

Abraham. 

Tufts. 

Stetson. 

Stetson. 

Harris. 

Harris. 

Newell. 

Goodwin. 

Lewis. 

Larkin. 

Childs. 

Payson. 

Barker. 

Larkin. 

Flint. 



:\ 



Town. 



200 EECOEDS OF THE FIRST CHUKCH. 

Sep. 9. Ann Hooper, Wife of Nath' Hooper. Hooper. 

Sally Thompson, Wife of Tim" Thompson, Junf. Thompson. 

Dismifsed May 8, 1817. 
Oct. 14. Susannah Simonds, Wile of Joseph Simouds. Simonds. 

Difmifsed. 
Thomas Osgood, & wife, ) Dismifsed 1 Dismifsed ) ^ ■, 
Hannah Osgood. > Apr., 1817. I from the) 

Asa Town, & wife, f South Chh 

Dorothy Town. Dismifsed 1825. J ia Ando 

ver, recommended & admitted to this Chh. 

1804. Church Members. [.308] 
Nov. 11. Mercy Welsh, (from y* Chh. in Burlington. 

1805. Anne Murray, dismifsed Oct. 9"', 1806. 
March 10. Elisabeth Stetson, Wife of Jonah Stetson. 
June 9. Elisabeth Carlelon (Widow). 
Nov. 10. Mary Radford. 

1806. Rebecca Oaks, now Mrs. Davidson. 
Jan. 12. Jonathan Howe, difmifsed Nov. 10, 1808. 
Feb. 9. Cynthia Stoddard, Widow, no-w Mrs. 'Woodsvard. Stoddard. 
Mar. 9. Mary Stoddard, Wife of Samuel Stoddard, Stoddard. 

died Aug. 1P\ 185(?)3 [W. I. B.]. 
Archelaus Flint, & his Wife, ) Difmifsed to Dr. 
Mary Flint. i Neil's Chh., Phila, 

Dec. 8, 1810 (or 1810?). 
Dijah Bowen, & his wife, ? 
Elisabeth Bowen. S 

Alfred Skelton, & wife, \ 
Patty Skelton. Dismifsed ) to Winthrop chh. 

Jan., 1834. 
Ann (or Anne) Brown, widow. Brown. 

Mary Cunningham, now Mrs. Banister. Dis- Cunningham. 

mifsed. 
Apr. 13. Lucy Bryant, Wife of Tim° Bryant (from y^ S** Bryant. 

chh. in Reading). 
Jane Millar, wife of Hezekiah Millar. Millar. 

SaUy Keyes, now Mrs. Brown, excommunicated Keyes. 

Aug. 8, 1816. 
22. Hannah Bradbury, Wife of Charles Bradbury. Bradbury. 
May 11. Benjamin Skelton. Dismifsed to the Chh. Skelton. 

Pelham. 
[May 11.] Martha Vinal, Wife of Otis Viual, Dismifsed Yinal. 

to Park Street Church. 
Rebecca Brown. Dismissed to Old South Brown. 

Church, Boston, July 10, 1823 [W. F.]. 
June 8. Elisabeth Bartlett, Wife of Josiah Bartlett. Bartlett. 

Disniifs'd Apr. 1817. 



Welfh. 

Murray. 

Stetson. 

Carleton. 

Radford. 

Oaks. 

Howe. 



Flint. 



Bowen. 



Skelton. 



ADMISSIONS, FULL COMMUNION. 201 

[1806.] Atin Skelton, now Mrs. Haggett. Dismifed Skelton. 

at her request. 
July 13- Isaac Kendall [to Winthrop ch.]. 

Joanna Brown, wife of Jacob Brown [dismissed to the Cal- 
vinistic Church in Leominster, Aug., 1827. W. F.]. 
Oct. 12. Rebecca Langdon, wife of John W. Langdon [dismissed to 

Park St., Aug., 1818. W. F.]. 
Lucy Call, wife of Jas. Call, Jr., dismissed Nov. 10, 1808. 

1 Disi to Con- 
Elisabeth Leathe, from the Chh. in Woburn. >^,^\ \ , 

W oburn, July 

_ 5, 1821. Eec. 
Mary Tufts, wife of Peter Tufts, (Chh. in Koyalston, dis- 
missed Mar. 5, 1807 [became Baptist, see Rec. p. 68]. 
Nov. 9. John Cary. 

Esther Mirick (widow). Dismissed to the Baptist Chh. 
[Apr. 9, 1809. Rec] 
Dec. 14. Martha Hunt, wife of Simeon Hunt. 

1807. Jan. 11. Mary Fay, widow. Died Aug. 1, 1841. [W. I. B,] 
Apr. 19. Peggy Porter, wife of Amasa Porter [a member in 1836^]. 
July 12. Charles Cleveland, and his wife, ) From Dr. Barnard's Chh., 

Mehetabel Cleveland. > Salem. Dismissed to Mr. 

Huntington's chh., Boston. [Reml to Boston & dis** to 
Old South, May 13, 1815.] 
Abigail Breese, now Mrs. Salisbury, from the Chh. in 
Shrewsbury, dismissed to Old South Chh. Feb. 6, 1823. 
Aug. 9. Sarah Taylor, widow. 

Sep. 13. Mary Murray, widow [died 1829]. 

Dec. 13. Samuel M'^Gregory Burnsides, dismissed at his request, 

1808. Aug. 7, 1817; [removed to Worcester. Rec.'}. 

May 8. Mary Pratt, wife of John Pratt, dismissed at her request, 

July 10, 1817, to Dr. Channing's Chh. [Boston, she having 
removed to B. Rec.}. 

June 12. Ann Rayner. 

Isaac Hurd, son of Joseph Hurd, dismissed to the Chh. in 

1809. Lynn, Aug., 1813. 

Feb. 12. John Patten, dismissed to y^ Chh. in Topsham, June 19, 1814. 

Mar 9. Mary Frothingham, wife of Richard Frothingham, dismissed 

[1809]. from Maiden Chh. [d. Oct. 2, 1815]. 

Apr. 9. Lydia Sweetser, wife of Sam'. Sweetser, from the Chh. in Lynn. 

May 14. Mary Wilson, wife of Joseph AVilson. 

June 11. Mary Gage, wife of Isaac Gage. 

^ [1836] here and ou following pages means that the person continued to be a 
member in that year. Dates, etc., subsequent to Admissions are, before 1820, in- 
terlineations by Dr. Morse; later they are by Drs. Fay or Budingtoii. 



202 RECORDS OF THE FIRST CHURCH. 

Aug. 13. Isaac Warren, Juu' [H. C, 1S05, d. 1815?]. 
Nov. 12. Auua Wyer, widow. 

Mary Carlton, wife of Isaac Carlton. 

Catharine Alexander, wife of Giles A. Dismissed to Dumar- 
estou (?). 

Deborah \'inal. 

1810. Deborah Tufts. Dismissed to Chh. in Danvers. 

Aug. 13. JMartha Mirick, wife of Benj. Mirick [d. Sep. 16, 1817]. 

Hannah Spofford (Mrs. O. Brown). Dismissed to the 

Church in Kingston. 
Ruth Warren. 

Tabitha Anger, wife of Benj" Anger. Dismissed from y* chh. 
in Chelmsford. 
Oct. 14. Mary Parker, wife of Joseph Parker [d. 1825]. 

Nov. 11. Betsey Kettell, daughter of Andrew Kettell [1836]. 

Hepzibah Kettell (now Mrs. Flint), daughter of Jon? Kettell 

[to Winthrop ch.]. 
Sarah Carnes. Dismissed to Bap. chh. in Baldwin Place, 

1811. Boston [1836]. 

Jan. 13. Hannah Hunnewell, widow. 

Nancy Rugg, wife of Sam'. Rugg [1836]. 
Apr. 14. Simeon Flint, & wife, ) [to Winthrop ch.]. 

Lydia Flint i [d. June 9, 1814]. 

Amos Warren [d. Sep. 13, 1814]. 

Martha Edes [dismissed July 8, 1830, to Newport]. 
May 12. Cotton Center. 

Susannah Lamson [1836, d. 1842]. 

Elizabeth Hadley [1836]. 
June 9. Jeremiah Evarts, & his wife, 7 Dismissed from the first Chh. 

Mahetabel Evarts. ) in N. Haven, & recommended 

Dismis'i to Park St., Nov. 5, 1817. 
July 14. Mary Kurd (Mrs. Ladd, Deceased) [1836]. 

[1811]. Aug. 11. Nancy Richardson, wife of Job. Richardson [1836]. 
Oct. 13. Harriet Johnson. Dismissed to Medford, Apr. 1839. 

1812. April 12 Susanna Foster [1836]. 
Nov. 8. Elisabeth Fessenden [d., a member, June 18, 1842]. 

Charlotte Sawyer, wife of Peter Sawyer [1836]. 
■ Mary Tufts, wife of Gilbert Tufts [1836, d. June 24, 1863] 

1813. Eliza Harris. 

Jany. 10. Elias Phinney, from y« chh. in Thomastown, dismissed 

May 9'.h, 1817. 
July 11. Abraham Rand Thompson, do. do- to Universalist ch. 

Aug. 8. Sukey Hyde, wife of Enoch Hyde [1836]. 

Martha Hovey, wife of Abijah Hovey [1836J. 

Clarissa Wheeler, wife of W™ Wheeler. 
Nov. 14. Samuel Kidder, and his wife, Dis^ to Medford, Oct. 6, 1831. 



4 



4< 



ADMISSIONS, FULL COMMUNION. 



203 



Dec. 12, 

1814. 
Jan. 9. 



Feb. 13. 



Sep. 11. 


1815. 


March 12 


July 9. 


Oct. 8. 


1816. Dec 



1817. 
Jan. 12. 



Hannah P. Kidder. 

Elizabeth Stevens [1836?]. 

Mary Russell Stevens. 

Mary Tufts, daughter of Dr. Tufts. 

Mary Smith Wiley. 

Amos Williugton. Dismissed to Ashby. 

'ad. in private (sick) 



Mary Bartlett, wife of George Bartlett, 



Nov. 11, 1813, dis-J to 
2d chh. C. Mar. 17, 
1817 (or Apr., 1817). 



Hannah Wiley [1836]. 

Mary Kettell. 

Sarah Call Kettell [dis* to Winthrop ch., Dec. 27,/32]. 

Elisabeth Thompson, wife of Abraham R. Thompson, dis- 
missed May &^ or 9*, 1817. [Universalists.] 

Abigail Gibbs, wife of James Gibbs [1836]. 

Sally Brown, daughter of Joseph Brown [1836]. 

Job Richardson. Died Nov. 11, 1868 [1836]. 

Thomas Kettell. " Sep. 17, 1850 [1836]. 

John Soley. " Apr. 6, 1851 [1836]. 

Dolly Hildreth Robbins. 

Emma Perry [1836]. 

Sam'. Finlcy Breese Morse. Dismissed Oct, 6, 1820. 

^Y^ Tufts. [Dismissed Dec. 27/32, to Winthrop ch.] 

May, 1819, ? [See again July 
Mch. 11, 1819. S 11, 1822, after 
he had renounced Universale 
dis. to Hudson, N. Y.] 

Amelia Adams, wife of Ashur Adams. 



John Tainter, Jun^ 



Nancy Wilson, 

Susan Haynes, 
Betsey Newell, 
Betsey Tufts. 
Mary Shepard. 
Betsey Rugg. 
Abigail Tapley. 



Jeremy Wilson [disi to Winthrop ch. 

Dec. 27/32]. 
Guy C. Haynes. 
Joseph Newell [1836]. 



Dismissed to Village chh., Dorchester. 

" to 1" chh., Dedham, June, 1829. 
'♦ to Winthrop chh., Jan. 1834 
(Mrs. Amos Tufts). 
Ruth Soley. " to Trinity chh., Boston [1836]. 

Susan Newell. " " South Reading (Mrs. Custis). 

Catharine Edes. " " chh., Newport, R. I., July 8, 

1830 (Mrs. Beecher). 
Elizabeth Ingersoll, wife of David Ingersoll. 
Sarah Shattuck, wife of Shadrach Shattuck (Mrs. Stickney). 
Hannah Mead, " " Saml Mead [1836] (Mrs. Brown). 
Francis Read, dismis'' May 11, 1820. 



204 RECORDS OF THE FIIiST CHURCH. 

1817. Evelina Hull, dismis^ & is a Baptist (Mrs. Frost). 

Margaret Center, " to D^ Jenks's chh., Dec. 7, 1726. 
Mary Richardson [1836]. 
Feb. 9. Sidney Edwards Morse [je. 2-3]. Dismis* Oct. 6, 1820. 

Richard Gary Morse [ae. 21^]. " " " 

Catharine Bradstreet [June 6, 1837, se. 84 (sister of Mary. 

See 1806) 1836]. 
Mary Jaquith, wife of Oliver Jaquith. 
Harriet Jaques, " Sam'. Jaques. Dismis*^ to 2** oh. Mayl6, 

1819, connexion dissol? 
Susan Wy man, " Nehemiah Wyman [1836]. 
Sarah Johnson. Excommunicated. 

Susannah Cudworth, from N. South Chh., Boston [1836]. 
Harriet Mead, disrais'' May 11, 1820 [to Methodist chh.]. 
Susanna Larapson [Mrs. Jas. Hunnewell, who died, a member, 

Feb. 14, 1870]. 
Lydia Tufts Perry [1836]. 
Mary Haynes. 

Mary Lamson, dismissed Sep. 22, 1822, to Woburn. 
Eliza Skimmer. 

Mary Kettell, wife of Thos. Kettell [1836]. 
Mar. 9. Solomon Hovey, & wife, 1 [1836]. 

Sarah Hovey. ) [1836]. 

Rebecca Haynes, widow [1836]. 
Lilies Rand, wife of Thos. B. Rand [1836]. 
Phebe Carter, dismissed July 11, 1822. 

Betsey Hooper Newhall, dismissed to a Baptist chh. in Provi- 
dence, June, 1830. 
Ann Catharine Read, dismissed to the Hanover (?) chh., Boston, 
r admonished Feb. 7, 1822. Rec. (disorderly 
Mary Jackson. -: walking). Excommunicated Oct. 10, 1822 
( (then Mrs. Henry Alexander. Rec. — do. — 
Apr. 13. Eliab Parker M^Intire [to Winthrop ch.]. 

John Todd [D.D.], dismissed to Park S*. chh. Jan. 8, 1818 

[removed to Boston]. 
Mary Whitmarsh (Mrs. Oliver) [1836]. 
Grace Wales Simonds, died at Abington, Feb. 15, 

1819 [1836]. 
Pamela Martin, dismissed to 3"^ chh., Salem [May 30, 1824. 

Rec.]. 
May 11. William Wyman, from the chh. in Walpole, N. H. 

Susanna Brown, wife of George Brown, chh. in W. Cambridge. 
Elijah INIead, & his wife, ) dismissed to the Methodist chh., 
Abigail Mead. ) May 11, 1820. 

Frederick Peabody, & his wife, ) Excommunicated Dec. 9, 
Rebecca Peabody [183G]. > 1830. 



ADMISSIONS, FULL COMMUNION. 205 

Lydia Low, wife of David Low [1836]. 

Mary Wiuship, wife of John Winship, dismis? to Cambridg- 

port [183G]. 
Elizabeth Eames. 

Lydia Young, dismis'? to the 1'' chh., Randolph, May 6, 1824. 
Hannah Cutting. 
Sarah Upton. 
Rebecca Adams Campbell. 

1817. ]\Iartha Ann Barrett Campbell. 
Jime 8. Oliver Jaquith. 

Ruth Rose. Dismissed to the Baptists, May, 1836 [1836]. 

Harriet Dean, wife of Loammi Dean [1836]. 

Harriet Tewksbury. Dismissed to the chh. in Stratham, 
N. H., Feb. 8, 1827. 

Rebecca Barker. 
July 13. Joseph F. Tufts, & his wife, > .^^ wiuthrop ch.]. 

Hannah Tufts. > ^ ^ ■* 

Sep. 11. Persis Howard, from the 1^' chh. in Cambridge. 

1818. Mar. 5. Amos S. Hutchinson, from y^ 1" chh. in N. Haven. 
8. Benjamin Brown. Died Aug. 12, 1853 [1836]. 

Amos S. Adams. Dismissed to Tab. chh., Salem, 1829. 

George Carlton. 
Apr. 12. Lot Poole, & his wife, \ From the chh. in S. Reading by letter. 

Lydia Poole. Dismis > sed to Bowdoin St. chh., Boston, 
Nov., 1835. 
May 10. Sarah Johnson, W. [Excom. Jan. 9, 1823. Rec] [1836]. 

Mary Leach, wife of Thos. Leach. 

Mary Bradbury, " Chas. Bradbury [1836]. 
Sep. 13. Eunice Gregory [1836]. 

Ann Procter. 

1819. Susan F. Phipps, wife of Joshua B. Phipps. 
Apr. 11. Eliza Larkin, W. of Isaac Larkin [1836]. 
May 9. John Lamb, & his wife, 

Mary Lamb. 

Jonathan Call [1836]. 
July 8. W? Burchmore, from y" chh. in Lancaster, N. H. 

Aug. 27. Benj. B. Osgood " " N. Andover. 

Sep. 12. Chas. Bradbury [1836]. 

Geo. Clark, dismissed to Newbury (?). 

Marcy JMuUet. 

Martha Edmands [1836]. 
[This is the last entry of Members by Dr. Morse.] 

The Record of Admissions made by Rev. Dr. Morse begins at the 
top of page 300 of the Record Book, and continues to the foot of page 
314 (Sept. 12, 1819). Rev. Dr. Fay's Record begins (June 11, 1820) 



206 EECOKDS OF THE FIRST CHURCH. 

at the top of page 315, and is continued to the middle of page 329, 
where it ends (March 10, 1839), and Eev. Dr. Budington's begins 
(June 18, 1840). Names of those admitted by the latter two are in 
the Church Manuals. 

All the Baptisms recorded before 1833 are here printed. Pages 
206-208 show the full form of entries. On and from page 208 all the 
facts are given, but in a condensed form. 

[144] BAPTISMS. Mr. Jed^ Morse, 

•■ -■ Minister. 

Date. ^Ir. Jedidiah Morse was installed to the pastoral office of the 

1789. Chh. & congregation in Charlestown, April 30th, 1789 — 

Here follows a list of the names of persons baptized in Charlea- 
towii during his Ministry — 
April 5. John, S. of Benj" & ]Mary Hurd, born March 30'>. Hurd. 

Polly Larldn, 1). of Joseph & Hannah Hurd, Hurd. 

Apr. 1?» 
Sukey, D. of Timothy & Mary Thompson, Thompson. 

Mar. 29. 
Maria Uu/sell, D. of "\^> & Elisabeth Stevens — Stevens, 
g^ Chasm from Ap. to Aug', say of 3 males & 4 females. 
Date. ^ [1^5] 

1789. Baptisms. ^^^ ^^^^^^ 

Aug. 2. John, S. of Nathan & Phebe Dexter, born July. Dexter. 

9. Laban, S. of Laban & Ilearsey, born Aug. Ilearfey. 

William, S. of Jon" & Hepzibah Kettell, born Kettell. 

Aug. 
Isaac, S. of William II. & Polly Manning, Manning, 
born Aug. 
Oct. 11. Polly, D. of Joseph & Mary IMiller, born Sep. 11. Miller. 

18. Betsey Tlinyre, D. of Amos & Joanna Sampson, Sampson, 

born Oct. 15. 
Nov. 8. Abraham, S. of Isaac & Sukey Snow, born Snow. 

Nov. 2. 
Hannah, D. of Joseph & Rebecca Cordis, born Cordis. 

Nov. 0. 
Nancy, D. of Bela & Nancy Mitchell, born Mitchell. 
Oct. 22.' 
Dec. 6. /o//n, S. of Benj. &]MarthaMirick, born Dec. 5. Mirick. 

Baptized this year, Total Males, 10 ; Females, 11. Total, 21. 

1790. Sarah, D. of John & Anne Broomfield, born Broomfield. 
Jan. 3. Nov. 16, 1789; died Sep. 29, 1790. 

Rachel, D. of Isaac & Hannah Mallet, born Mallet. 
Jan. 8. 
March 14. Betsey, D. of "William & Betfey Raymond, born Raymond. 



BAPTISMS, 1789-1791. 



207 



April 14. David, S. of Eliph' & Susanna Newell, born Newell. 

Mar. 31. 
May 9. Harriett, D. of John k Lopaus, born April. Lopans. 

30. i«c?/, D.of Jon" & Willington, born May. Williugton. 

June 13. John, S. of Eben^ & Mary Larkin, born Larkin. 
June 10. 
Lucy, D. of Phillip & Mary Harrod, Negro, Harrod. 
born June 4. 
27. Caleb, S. of Samuel & Hannah Swan, born Swan. 
June 23. 
Harriet, D. of Andrew & Stimpson, born Stimpson. 

June. 
Aug. 9. ^//;:a, D. of Jon! & Sarah Thompson, born Aug. Thompson. 

22. Elisabeth, D. of William & Elisabeth Stevens, Stevens. 

born Aug. 17. 
Sep. 19. Hepzibah, D. of Jon» & Hepzl" Kettell, born Sep. Kettell. 

Polly, D. of Will™ H. & Polly Manning, born Manning. 

Sep. 14. 
Jackson, S. of Andrew & Sally Lopans, bom Sep. Lopans. 
Joseph, S. of Sam'. & Abiel Larkin, born Sep. Larkin. 
[143] Baptisms. Mr. Morse. 

1790. Oct. 10. Simon, S. of Moses & Hall, born Sep. Hall. 

24. Sally, D. of Joseph & Mary Miller, born Oct. 8. Miller. 
Nov. 14. Joanna, D. of Michael & Ruth ]\lallet, born. Mallet. 
Sukey, D. of Barnabas & Elisabeth Barker, Barker, 
born Nov. 2. 

1791. Baptized this year, Males, 6; Females, 14. Total, 20. 

Jan. 23. Mary, D. of Rich? & Mary Frothingbam, b. Frothingham. 

Jan., 1791. 
30. Nathaniel, S. of David & Ann Edmunds, b. Edmunds. 

Jan. 27, 1791. 
Feb. 19. Josiah Whittemore, S. of Josiah & Elizl^ Bartlett, ) 

born Feb. 8, 1791 ; bapt-i by Dr. Parker. ]" ^artlett. 
March 13. Charles, S. of David & Elis^ Devens, born 7 Devens. 
March. 
Lucretia, D. A. K. Tufts & Wife, born 10 March. Tufts. 
20. John, S. of W> Wiley & Wife, " " Wiley. 

April 10. il/a;-?/, D. of John Kidder & Wife, " 5 April. Kidder. 
May 1. Samuel Finley Breese, S. of Jedl' & Elisabeth > 

Ann Morse, born April 27. I Morse. 

15. Elisabeth, D. of David Fosdick & Wife, born Fosdick. 

May, 1791. 
Sally Turner, D. of John & Mary Runey, born Runey. 
May, 1791. 
29. Charles, S. of Joseph & Hannah Hurd, born Hurd. 

May 28, 1791. 



208 



RECORDS OP THE FIRST CHURCH. 



June 12. 



1791. 
June 26. 

Aug. 14. 

21. 

Date. 

Aug. 28. 

Sep. 25. 
Oct. 10. 
Nov. 20. 

Dec. 11. 

18. 



1792. 
Jan. 8. 

Feb. 19. 
May 6. 

27. 



June 3. 
17. 

1792. 
July 8. 



Aug. 19. 
Sep. 30. 
Oct. 7. 

28. 
Nov. 4. 
Nov. 18. 



John Parker, ) Sons of Samuel Rand t>„ j 

Samuel. > & Wife. 

John Gardner, S. of Isaac & Hannah Mallet. Mallet. 

John Taylor, S. of Cotton & Margaret Center, | rt .^i. 

born Feb. 7, 1791. i ^ ^^' 

Baptisms. [147] Mr. Morse. 

Nathaniel, S. of Josiah Willington & Wife, born Willington. 

June 25. 
Lydia, D. of John Duncklee & Wife, born Duucklee. 

Aug. 11. 
Joseph, S. of Bartholomew Raymond & Wife, Raymond. 

born Aug. 



Child. Father. Mother. 

Timothy. Nathan and Wife. 

Susannah Johnson. Eliphalet " 



Elisabeth. 

Samuel Phillips 

Harriot. 

Eleazer. 

Eliza Russell. 

Elisabeth , 

Moses, 

Samuel Pierce, 

Aaron, 

Hannah Williams. 



Nathan ' ' 

Saml " 

Benj? and Mary. 
William and Wife. 
Lemuel " 



Born. 

Aug. 24. 

" 22. 
Sep. IG. 
Oct. 2. 
Nov. 16. 

" 14. 
Dec. 11. 






Family Name. 

Dexter. 

Newell. 

Whittemore. 

Payson. 

Hurd. 

Newhall. 

Shepherd. 

Died Dec 



14. 



Hadley. 



John. 



Josiah & Elisabeth. Jan. 4. Bartlett. 



Baptised by Dr. Parker of Boston. 



William. 

Isaac. 

Lois. 

Anne. 

Sarah Leathbridge. 



Robert & Wife. 
W™ H. 



Calder. 
Manning. 



Saml 



i- 



oodward. 



Becca (D.) 
Joseph. 
Amos, 
Deborah, 
Joseph, 
William. 
David. 
Hannah. 



Jacob 
Benj? 

^ Amos 



June. 



Foster 
!Mirick. 

Tufts. 



[148] 



J 



John & Wife. 
William " 



Jedidiah Edwards. Jed"? 



Green. 
Wiley. 
Morse. 



July 3, '92. 
Aug. 
Sep. 
Oct. 4. 

died July 31, 1793, 8 o'clock evening. 
Hannah. Cotton & Wife. Center. 

Elijah. Moses " Iladley. 

Eunice CooHdije. Joseph " Millar. 



BAPTISMS, 1793. 



209 



Date. Child. Father. Mother. Born. Family Name. 

Dec. 2. Betsey. Win. & Wife. Bispham. 

9. William. William " Codmau. 
2. Samuel William. Saiq}, Jr. " baptisedby Dr. Walter. Dexter. 

1793. Jan. 6. Elisabeth. Joseph " 
13. George. John " 

Sarah Grace. Sam'. " 

27. Joseph Warren. Eliphalet & Wife. 
Hepzibah Goodwin, \ Saml 
Benjamin Goodwin, > & wife. 
Feb. 17. Mary Russell. A\>W. &" 
Mar. 3. John. John " 

10. liool-sbarr Marshall. Barnabas & Wife. 
Susanna. Joseph & Wife. 

[Mrs. Jas. Hunnewell, born Sep 
Eliza Jackson. Amariah & Wife. 
John. Isaac & Wife. 

30. Reuben Gould. Isaac & Wife. 
Hepzibah Larkin. Sam'. " 



Jan. 


Hurd. 


" '93. 


Iluney. 
Payson. 
Newell. 


1790. 
1791. 


> Mansir. 


Feb. 


Stevens. 


(t 


Duucklee. 


. Feb. 


Barker. 




Lamson. 


1792.] 


Childs. 




Smith. 


Mar. 


Mallet. 


(( 


Rand. 


(( 


Gardner. 



Apr. 


14. 


Thomas. 


John " 


(( 


Gardner. 


May 


12. 


Ruthy Larkin. 


Wife of Isaac (adult] 


|. 


) [149] 






Isaac. 


Isaac & Wife, 2 yrs. 


old. 


f Larkin. 






Mary Johnson. 


(( ^l 


Mar. 


) 






Lucy Williams. 


Wife of Gerfhom (adult). 


Williams. 






Matthew. 


INIatthew & Wife. 


May. 


Butman. 






James Gould. 


James " 




Turner. 




26. 


Hannah. 


David " 


(( 


Fosdick. 


Jane 


30. 


Robert Ball, 


) 










Benjamin Wood, \- Thomas & Mary. 




Edes. 






Mary. 


) 






July 


1 . 


Elizabeth ; Joh 


n; Benjamin; Johnathan-Locke , 


' [■ Stevens. 






Isaac, of John & Elizabeth. 






28. 


Joseph Badger. 


John & Wife. 


July 21. 


Kidder. 


Aug. 


2.5. 


Elizabeth Webb. 


Joseph " 


Aug. 


Phipps. 


Sept. 


29. 


Caleb. 


Caleb 


Sep. 22. 


Swan. 






Eliza. 


Daniel " 


(( 


Scott. 






Robert. 


Robert " 


" 22. 


Calder. 




30. 


Charlotte. 


AV™H. " 


" 22. 


Manning. 


Oct. 


6. 


Lemuel. 


Lemuel " 


Oct. 


Shepherd. 






Peter. 


William " 


(( 


Hay. 




13. 


Samuel. 


Pelatiah " 


Sep. 


Stevens. 




27. 


Thomas Millar. 


Timothy " 


Oct. 


Thompson. 


Xov. 


10. 


Susannah Richardson (Adult). 




Richardson. 






Rhoda. 


Thomas & Wife. 


Nov. 


Hooper. 


Nov. 


24. 


Franklin. 


Samuel " 




Dexter. 










(baptised by Dr. Walter.) 



14 



210 



RECORDS OF THE ElPwST CHURCH. 



Date. 
1793. 
Dec. 15. 

22. 
31. 

1794. 
Jan. 5. 



19. 

Feb. 9. 
16. 

23. 



Apr. 19. Gorham 

20. 

27. 

May 11. 

18. 

June 15. 

July 13. 
20. 

20. 

Aug. 3. 

10. 



24. 
Sep. 14. 

28. 
Oct. 19. 

20. 
Nov. 2. 

Dec. 14. 



Child. Father. Mother. 

Abigail. Benj. & Wife. 

Joshua. Joshua " 

Betsey Hooper. Naphtali " 
Sally. Nathan ' ' 

Benj. Morse. William " 
John, S. of Esther Burdit — by Mr 

presented by his grandmother Burdit, about 

8 or 9 years old. 
Abigail. Timothy & Wife. 

Gideon. Amos " 

Joseph. Joseph " 

Edwards. Jedidiah " 

Rebekah Turner, W™ " 

Abigail. Amos " 

Patty Miles. Nathan " 

William,) rj.^^^^ William & Alice. "22, '' 
Alice. ) 

Josiah & Wife, 

bap. by Dr. Parker. 
John. "William & Wife. Apr. 

Barnabas. James " 

Mary. David, Jr. " ]\Iay. 

Emily. Sam'. " " 10, '94. 

Eliza. Joseph " 

Jacob. Jacob " Apr., 1791. 

Maria Oliver. Amariah " June, 1794. 

Ebenezer. Samuel " July, " 

William; Susannah; Mary; Sarah; Elisabeth; 

of Wi;:, deceased, & wife, Mary. 
James, S. of Elisabeth Davis, Widow. 
Benjamin. John & Wife deceased. 

Wm. Wignall. W?' W. (deceased), & Wife, 

Elisabeth, b. July 27, '94. 
Geo. Rapelye. W™ & Wife. b. " " 

Mary. Jonathan " Aug. " 

James; Sarah; Thomas; Abigail; children of 

James & Wife. 
Amos. Am mi " 

Isaac. Moses " 

Sally. Cotton " b. Sep., '94. 

Abraham. Samuel " Oct., '94. 

Charles. Aaron " " " 

Daniel. Daniel " u u 

Harriet. Isaac " " '• 

Thomas. Thomas Wait" Nov., '94. 



Born. 


Family Name. 


Nov. 


llurd. 


Dec. 


Hooper. [150] 


" 


Newhall. 


" 15. 


Whittemore. 


(1 


Ban ton. 


r. Sprague, 


1 Sprague. 


irdit, about 


'> or Burdit. 


Jan. 3, '94. 


W^alker. 


" 5, " 


Samson. 


(( u 


Lamsou. 


Feb. 7, " 


Morse. 


(1 It 


Newhall. 


" 


Tufts. 


ti It 


Dexter. 



Harris. 
Bartlett. 

Wiley. 

Turner. 

Edmunds. 

Payson. 

IVIillar. 

Farnsworth. 

Childs. 

Larkin. 

[• Praddox. 

Davis. [151] 
Turner. 

Stevens. 

Stimpson. 

Kettle. 

Frothingham. 
Cutter. 
Iladley. 
Center. 
Woodward. 
Putnam. 
Scott. 
Learned. 
Pratt. 



BAPTISMS, 1795. 



211 



Date. 


Child. 


Father. 


Mother. 


Born 


I. 


Family Name. 




Prudence. 


Isaac & Wite. 


Dec, 


'94. 


Smith. 


1795. 


William. 


William 


(1 




Jan. 




Bispham. 


Jan. 11. 


Ardelia Louisa. 


Ammi 


" 




" 




Tufts. 


Feb. 8. 


Sarah Mead. 


John 


" 




u 




Duncklee. 


Mar. 15. 


Jonathan Call. 


\\'^ H. 


(( 




Mar. 




INIanning. 


Apr. 25. 


Rebecca Cordis. 


John Walley 


& Wife. 


Apr. 




Langdon. 


June 7. 


Sophia ; Joseph 


; Ebenezer ; 


Gideon 


; Harriet ; 






children of Sarah Tirre! 


I, widow. 






Tirrel. 


11. 


Rebecca. 


Barnabas & Wife. 


June. 




Barker. [152] 




David. 


David 






May. 




Stetson. 


21. 


Richard Cary. 


Jedidiah 






June 18. 


Morse. 


27. 


Mary Parker. 


Ebeu-: 






Apr., 


'95. 


Gage. 


July 12. 


Thos. Harling. 


Lemuel 










Shepherd. 


19. 


Hepzibah. 


David 






July 


16. 


Fosdick. 


Aug. 9. 


Hannah. 


Joshua 






Aug. 


2. 


Hooper. 


16. 


Sani\ Phillips. 


Saml 






u 




Pay son. 


20. 


Charlotte. 


Josiah 






u 




Bartlett. 






(baptised by 


Dr. Walter.) 






30. 


Hannah. 


Pelatiah & AVife. 


Aug. 




Stevens. 




Ruthy, I 
Becca. i (twin ( 


Amariah 




11 






) Child. 




laughters. 


abL 




t( 


20. 


Sep. 13. 


Lydia Waldo. 


Dan' & Wife. 




(( 




Austin. 




Charlotte. 


Andrew Woodbury & Wife. 


Aug Duty. 


20. 


Rebecca Gorham 


'.. Geo. & Wife 




Sep. 




Bartlett. 


27. 


George. 


Joseph 


u 




(( 




Hurd. 




John. 


John 


(1 




(( 




Gardner. 


Oct. 4. 


Thomas. 


Thomas 


u 




<( 




Edes. 




TJiomas. 


Thomas 


<( 




Oct. 




Hooper. 


18. 


John; Anne; Jos^eph ; 














children of late Richard 


(( 


now a 


widow. 




Hay. 




Ann. 


Robert 


(( 




Oct. 




Calder. 




Seth. 


John 


(( 




(( 




Stevens. 


25. 


Joel. 


Joel & Rebecca. 


({ 




Abbot. 


Nov. 15. 


Martha Hall. 


Timothy 


& Wife. 


Nov. 




Walker. 




Sally. 


Isaac 






(( 




Mallet. 




Ruth. 


Isaac 






(( 




Larkin. 




Maria. 


William 






(( 




Miller. 


Dec. 13. 


Margaret Calef 


: Dan'. 






Dec. 




Scott. 


27. 


Samuel. 


Saml 






(( 




Cary. [153] 




George. 


Timothy 






u 




Thompson. 




Charles. 


Aaron 






(( 




Putnam. 


179G. 


William. 


Joseph 






u 




Lamson. 


Jan. 17. 


Tabitha Ireland 


. Jacob 






<( 




Thompson. 


24. 


Hannah. 


John 






Jan. 




Kidder. 




Benjamin. 


Benj. 






<( 




Gray. 



212 



KECOPwDS OF THE FIRST CHUKCH. 



Date. 

Jan. 31. 
Feb. 7. 
Mar. 20. 

Apr. 24. 

May 8. 

29. 

July 31. 

10. 

Aug. 14. 
21. 



Sep. 4. 

25. 

Oct. 2. 

9. 

16. 

Nov. 27. 

Dec. 18. 
25. 
1707. Jan 
Mar. 5. 

12. 
26. 

Apr. 2. 



Apr. 9. 



Child. 
Deborah. 
Sally Kettell. 
Josiah Stearns. 
Sophia. 
John Walley. 
Joseph . 
Mary Marvel. 
Sarah Call. 
Mary Sterret. 
Dorcas. 
Marcy Collis. 
Beta. 
Maria. 
Mary Larkin. 



Father. Mother. 

Amos & Wife. 
Richard " 
Benj? " 
(( 

John Walley & Wife. 
Joseph & Susannah. 

& Wife, adult. 

Jonathan & Wife. 
Lemuel " 

Isaac " 

James " 

Bela " 



Born. 

Jan. 
Feb. 
Mch. 



July. 



June. 



Aujr. 8. 



adult. 



Phillips *' " 

Phillis (Negro woman, old) belonged to J 

Rufsell, Esq., now/ree. 
Charles Muzzy, Isaac & Wife. 



19. 



William. 
Nathaniel. 
Charles. 
John, \ 
Samuel, ) 
Margaret. 



William " 

James. " 

David. " 

William " 

Nath'. " 



Aug. 
Sep. 

Oct. 



Nov. 



Dec, 

(( 

(Germans) . 
Feb. 

u 

Mar. 



Nathaniel Gorham. George " 
Nathaniel Mead. John " 

Sarah. William " 

22. William. Wilhelm " 
Naphtali. Naphtali " 

Harriet. William " 

Samuel Lord. Nathan " 
Alice. Cotton " 

Hannah Lewis. Sam'. " 

Martha Munroe (adult). Wife of Sam^ 
Benjamin. Sam' & Wife. 2 years. 

Stephen Knight. Saml " inf 

William; Mary; Stephen; Nancy; Elisabeth 
Rebecca; children of John, & Wife, INlary. 
Charles. Aaron & Wife. Apr. 

Susannah Johnson. Eliphalet " " 



1 



Family Name. 

Sampson. 
Frothiugham. 
Hurd. 
Trask. 
Langdon. 
Symonds. 
Trask. 
Kettell. 
Shepard. 
Smith. 

Frothingham. 
Mitchel. 
Burdett. 
Payson. 



Carleton. 
Hay. 
Turner. 
Stetson. 

Taylor. [154] 

Gorham. 

Bartlett. 

Duncklee. 

Wiley. 

Knoepfel.^ 

Newhall. 

]\Iillar. 

Dexter. 

Center. 

Woodward. 

Munroe. 

Munroe. 

De Costa. 
Putnam. 

Newell. 



1 MLKnoepfel & Wife (according to their own acct. of ymselves) were bom in 
Hefsc Cafscl, & came over to America about tlie middle of y* year 1795 — They 
profefs to be Protestants, and appear to be ferious and conscientious Christians. 
As yy were ftiangers and unacquainted with our language, y' were admitted to the 
privilege of having their child baptised without passing through the forms adopted 
by this Cbh. 



BAPTISMS, 1797. 



213 



Date. Child. Father. Mother. 

Apr. 23. Charles. W?' Holmes & Wife. 

[155] Catharine Whittemore. Peter " 

May 7. Thomas Ru/sell. Jed" " 

Mary. Amos " 

Catharine. Sam'. " 

Nathan, 10 mos. old. ) ^^^^j^^^ ^ ^^.^^^ 
Dorcas. 3^ years old. ) 

John, > John (deceased) & Wife, presented) 
Elizabeth. ) by their Grand Parents. > 



Bom. 


Family Name. 


Apr. 


Manning. 


(( 


Jones. 


May 6. 


Morse. 


u 


Tufts. 


April. 


Choate. 



Nicholls. 



Turner. 





Hannah. 


George (deceased) & Wife, 3 years. 


Ptuney. 


11. 


Theodosia. 


Robert & Wife. b. April. 


Calder. 


27. 


Joseph. 


Joseph 


" May. 


Miller. 




Elias. 


Elias 


(( u 


Farnsworth. 


June 11. 


Anna Kelly, adult. 




Kelly. 


July 8. 


Margaret. 


Daniel 


" July. 


Scott. 


23. 


Charles. 


TimT 


U it 


Walker. 




Bethiah. 


Joseph 


(( (( 


Phipps. 


30. 


Catharine. 


William 


U l( 


Bispham. 


Aug. 13. 


Isaac Davis. 


Andrew Woodbury & W^ife. Aug, 


. Duty. 


27. 


John Hay. 


Jacob & 


Wife. Aug. 


Farnsworth. 




Amariah. 


Amariah 


(( (1 


Child. 


Sep. 10. 


Charles. 


Isaac. 


^l << 


Mallet. 


17. 


John Welsh. 


Sam'. 


it <( 


Payson. 


21. 


Thos. Shepherd. Dan'. 


Sep. 


Leman. 


(bap. by Dr. Walter) .1 


^ David 


(( (i 


Stearns. 


Oct. 1. 


Lemuel. 


Jonah 


(( (( 


Stetson. 


15. 


John, 


[• Sam'. 




Austin. 




Abigail Lewis. 








Samuel. 


Joseph 




Lamson. 


16. 


Sally Beacham 


1. John, Jr. 


Oct. 


Carter. [156] 


Nov. 12. 


Samuel. 


Samuel 


Nov. 


Soley. 


19. 


Harriet. 


Dan'. 


U 11 


Austin. 




John Staunton. 


Thos. 


U li 


Edes. 


26. 


Catharine. 


George 


(( u 


Bartlett. 


Dec. 3. 


John Larkin. 


Phillips, Jr. '< 


Payson. 




Mary Francis. 


JohnW. 


1( 1( 


Langdon. 




Samuel. 


Sam' 


11 (1 


Munroe. 


10. 


Harriet. 


Daniel 


11 11 


Parker. 


21. 


Asa Burdett. 


David 


Dec. 


Barker. 




Jacob. 


Jacob 


It u 


Holt. 


1703. 


Ebenezer. 


Ebenezer 


11 11 


Gage. 


Feb. 4. 


Ebenezer. 


Amos 


" Jan. 


Sampson. 


11. 


Joanna, 


Benj. 


Feb. 


Gray. 



^ Child's name not given. 



214 



EECORDS OF THE FIIiST CHURCH. 



Date. 


Child. 


Father. 


Mother. 


Born. 


Family Namei 




Abigail. 




\\^ife. 


Jan. 


Wood. 


Mar. 4. 


Mary. 


Thomas 


(( 


Feb. 


Osgood. 


11. 


Ann Redwood, 


■wife of Daniel Rhodes, 


adult. 


Rhodes. 




Daniel. 


Daniel & Ann, 8 years. 


Rhodes. 


Apr. 8. 


John. 


David & Wife. 




Fosdick. 




Sarah Manning 


. David 


'' 




Edmunds. 


29. 


Pelatiah. 


Pelatiah 




Mar, 


Stevens. 


June 3. 


Nathan. 


Joseph 




(( 


Symonds. 




Lily. 


James 




June. 


Frothingham. 


10. 


Josiah, 


Josiah 


'• 1 baptized by ( 
• "1 Dr. Walter.! 


Bartlett. 




Caleb Call. 


(( 






Mary. 


!Mose3 




June. 


Hadley. 


24. 


A bigail. 


Isaac 




" 


Larkin. 


[157] 


Esther Swan. 


Thomas 




(( 


Hooper. 


July 8. 


William Larkin 


Wm. 




(< 


Lewis. 


15. 


Elisabeth Ann. 


Jedi^ 






Morse. 




Sarah. 


Aaron 






Putnam. 




Charles. 


John 






Stevens. 


29 


Edward. 


William 




June. 


Stimpson. 


Aug. 5. 


Thomas Rvfsell 


. Thos. & Mary. 




Payson. 


12. 


Benjamin. 


Timothy 


& Wife. 




Thompson. 




Peter. 


WiUiam 






Hay. 




Daniel. 


Daniel 






Emerson. 




John. 


John 






Edmands. 




James. 


John 






Gardner. 


26. 


Nathaniel. 


Nathl 






Gorham. 




Isaac. 


Isaac 






Carleton. 


Sep. 2. 


Sarah. 


David 






Stetson. 




Anna Rice. 


Lemuel 






Brown. 


9. 


John. 


Cotton 






Center. 


Oct. 14. 


George. 


George 






Bartlett. 


21. 


Marcy Sutton. 


Jacob & Wife.i 




Farnsworth. 


Nov. 11. 


Rebecca Barrington. Joshua " 




Hooper. 




Mary, aged 6 years, D. of Elisabeth, 


Widow. 


Breed. 


12. 


Hannah. 


Benj? & Wife, Boston 




Joy. 


24. 


Aratus Alexander. Jas. 




Oct. 


M'^Gibbon. 


Dec. 13. 


Mary. 


Daul 




Nov., 98. 


Scott. 


30. 


Mary Smith. 


William 






Wiley. 


1799. Jan 


. 28. Edward. 


Sam'. 




Jan. 


Payson. [15S] 


Feb. 10. 


John Cary. 


Elias 




Feb. 


Farnsworth. 


24. 


Barnabas. 


Barnabas 






Barker. 




Abigail. 


Eldad 






Whiting. 



1 When tills child was born Mrs. Farnsworth was a widow ; Iier husband having 
died fcveral months before. 



BAPTISMS, 1799. 



215 



Date. 


Child. F.atber. 


Mother. 


Born. 


Family Name. 




Anna Tufts. Peter & Wife. 




Jones. 


Mar. 10. 


Mary. Andrew W. 


n 






Duty. 


24. 


Josiah. Josiah 


^^ 






Harris. 


31. 


Elijah Tulman. John 


a 






Weatherby. 


Apr. 7. 


Thomas Stone. Dan'. 


(( 






Parker. 


U. 


Catharine. Timothy 
Mary. John P. 








Walker. 
Duncklee. 


28. 


Barnabas Turner. John 
Elisabeth A tin. Phillips, Jr. 








Runey. 
Payson. 


May 12. 


Ebenezer Larkin. Amariah 


1 1 






Childs. 


2G. 


Abigail Pratt. IMatthew 


i( 






Butman. 


June 16. 


Lydia Austin. Timothy 


i( 






Keith. 


30. 


George. Nathl 


(( 






Trask. 


July 7. 


William, ) children of W? i 
Anne. ) was at this time 


and Eunice ; she } 


Rand. 




a widow. 


) 




21. 


Mary Dorr. Francis & 


; AVife. 


b. July. 


Hyde. 


Sep. 8. 


Edward. W"? Holmes 


" 




Manning. 




George. Samuel 




(( 




Choate. 




Caroline. John 




u 




Choate. 


15. 


Joseph. John W. 




u 




Langdon. 




W'l^ Augustus. Ammi R. 




(( 




Tufts. 


Oct. 13. 


Thos. Shepherd. Dan'. 




u 




Leman. 


20. 


Nancy. James 




u 




Turner. 


[159] 27. 


John. William 




(( 




Hunnewell. 


Nov. 3. 


Lemuel. Lemuel 




«( 


4 years. 


Clark. 


10. 


Polly. Nicolas 




il 


Oct. 


Brown. 


18. 


Charlotte. John, Jr. 




(( 


8 mo. old. 


Carter. 


24. 


Elisabeth Ann. Thos. 




(( 


Nov. 


Edes. 


Dec. 29. 


Rebecca. David 




u 


Dec. 


Barker. 


1800. 


( Joseph. Joseph 
\ Margaret. William 




u 


Dec, '92 (?) 


Parker. 


Jan. 5. 




1( 


Nov., '99. 


Stimpson. 


Feb. 


Ruth Larkin. Sam"; 




(( 


Feb. 


Soley. 




David Wood. Nath'. 




(( 


Jan. 


Gorham. 




Mary. George 




(( 




Bartlett. 




Pamela. Seth 




11 




Sweetser. 


Mar. IG. 


Sally. Nathl 




u 




Turner. 




Joanna Evertson. David 




(( 




Vose. 


23. 


A bigail Welsh . Sam'. 




(1 


Mar. 


Payson. 


May 4. 


Hannah. Thomas 




(1 




Bradshaw. 


June 1. 


Lucy. Peter 




(( 


May. 


Jones. 


8. 


IF?* Murray. John 




u 




Edmands. 




Eliza. Daniel 




(( 


' 


Austin. 


9. 


John Choate. James 




u 




Calder. 


from Scotland, born at fea May, 1800. 


Baptised 


on board a vefsel at Boston. 


29. 


John. John & Wife. 




June. 


Thomas. 



216 



KECORDS OF THE FIRST CHURCH. 



Date. 



Born. 

June. 



[IGO] 
July 20. 



27. 

17. 

Aug. 17. 

Sep. 14. 
20. 
21. 



28. 
[161] 
Oct. 12. 

19. 

Nov. 9. 



16. 

30. 
1801. 
Jan. 4. 

18. 



Family Name. 

Center. 
Runey. 
Turner. 



July. 



Child. Father. Mother. 

Margaret. Cotton & "NVife. 

James Runey. St. 14. Joanna. 
Joanna., 4 yrs. old ^ John & Wife, 

John, 3 " " > 

RoV. Runeif, 1 " "3 
RoU Holmes, 3 yrs. old ) John & Wife 
Mary Barnard, 3 mo. ) 
Eliza. Benj-? & Wife. 

Caroline. John " " 

George, 18 mo. old, Richard " 
Phillips. Phillips, Jr. " ♦* 

Elijah Davis. Robert " " 

William. William " " 

Timothy k Charles. Tim", Jr. " 
Elisabeth Allen, > children of Elizabeth, widow ) 
Moses. ) of Moses. ) 

Sally; Esther; Hannah; Joseph; children of) 
Esther, widow of Joseph. ) 

Geo. Adams, S. of Amos & Wife. Sep. Sampson 

Elisabeth Clap, wife of Otis Clap, adult. Clap. 

Susan Makepeace, ) ^^^.j^^^^ ^^ Ebenezer & his K , . 
George Makepeace, > ^.^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ Y Larkm. 



Harris. 

Gray. 

Nutting. 

Carleton. 

Payson. 

Calder. 

Green. 

Thompson. 

Rand. 
Mirick. 



H 



Ebenezer. 



ife. 



Nathaniel. S. of Joseph & W: 
Elisabeth Ann. Otis 
Elisabeth. James 

Elisabeth Wiswall. John 
Mary. John 

Sally Robbing, wife of John. 
Prudence; Ruthy ; Joseph Leathers; Williavi 
Leathers ; ch'n Joseph & Wife Ruthy. 



S. of Amos & Wife. b. Oct. 

Daniel " " 

Thomas " " 

David " " 

Isaac " Nov. 

David, Jr. " 

Samuel " 

John. " 
Sam'. 

Richard " 

David " Jan. 

Jonathan " " 



Amos. 

John. 

John Phillips. 

Mary. 

Mary Ann. 

Elisabeth Ann. 

Sally Phillips. 

Elisabeth Ann. 

Samuel Cary. 

Eliza. 

Daniel. 

Jonathan. 

Geo. Washington. Tim? 

Edicard. Edward 



Lamson. 

Clap. 

Frothinghara. 

Trowbridge. 

Robbins. 

Robbins. 

X Bird. 

Tufts. 

Parker. 

Payson. 

Stetson. 

Carleton. 

Edmunds. 

Munroe. 

Burditt. 

Burditt. 

Carleton. 

Fosdick. 

Kettell. 

Walker. 

Goodwin. 



BAPTISMS, 1801. 



217 



Date. 


Child. 


Father. Mother. 


Born. Family Name. 


Feb. 


1. 


James Ru/sell. 


Jed^ & Wife. 


Morse. 






Isaac. 


Amariah 


^t. 


Childs. 






Harriet. 


John P. 


li 


Duncklee. 






Harriet. 


Wait 


u 


Pratt. 




15. 


John Sanford. 


Isaac 


u 


Larkin. 






Francis. 


Francis 


(( 


Hyde. 




22. 


John Marshall. 


Artemas 


11 


Ward. 






Sarah. 


Naphtali 


(( 


Newhall. 


Mar. 


1. 


Timothij. 


Timothy 


(( 


Keith. 




8. 


Susannah Currier. W'P 


u 


Hay. 




22. 


Abraham Smith 


Wt^ 


a 


Wiley. 






Maria. 


Josiah 


k( 


Harris. 


[162; 


29. 


Elisabeth Adams. Joseph 


^^ 


Reed. 


Apr. 


5. 


Eunice. 


Heze) iah 


" 


Blanchard. 




17. 


Elias Hammond. Joseph 


" 


Symonds. 


June 


21. 


George. 


John 


" 


Turner. 






Eliza & Elmina 


William 


(( 


Maxwell. 






Charlotte. 


AV™ Homes 


ii 


Manning. 




27. 


Boylston. 


Ebenezer 


n 


a year old. Jones. 


July 


5. 


John. 


Saml 


u 


Soley. 




19. 


Walter Moor. 


Daniel 


u 


Leman. 




26. 


Sarah Ann. 


Thomas 


11 


Phillips. 


Aug. 


9. 


Harriet. 


Sam'. 


u 


Jaques. 






Sarah Anii. 


George 


11 


Sylvester. 




12. 


Esther. 


John 


It 


Carter. 




16. 


Ehenezer Williams. Moses 


11 


Hadley. 






Elisabeth Sarjeant. Amos 


11 


Pohard. 






Aaron & Samuel. Aarou 


11 


Robbins. 






George. 


Lemuel 


11 


Shepard. 




25. 


Mary Ann. 


John & Mary. 


Feb. 9, 1801. Rogers. 




30. 


Ann. 


Benj. & Wife. 


Brown. 


Sep. 


13. 


Sarah. I 


'imothy, Jr. ' 




Thompson. 


Oct. 


11. 


William. 


Ebenezer ' 




Gage. 






William. 


Wilham ' 




Wood. 




18. 


Elisabeth Allen. 


Thomas ' 




Edmands. 


Nov. 


1. 


John. 


Daniel ' 




Parker. 




8. 


Sarah. 


Phillips ' 




Pay son. 




15. 


Henry. 


George ' 




Bartlett. 


Dec. 


12. 


Geo. Washingtor 


I. John ' 




Edmands. 




27. 


Eben Pai'sons. 


Joseph ' 




Babb. 


1802. 


Jan 


. 31. Catharine Greenleaf, D. o 


f Eben' & Wife. Thompson. [16;]J 


Feb. 


7. 


Harriet. 


Thomas & A 


Vife. 


Osgood. 




16. 


John. 




11 


Bryant. 


Mar. 


14. 


Otis. 


Otis 


11 


Clap. 




28. 


Eliza. 


Robert 


" 


C alder. 



218 



EECOEDS OF THE FIEST CHUIICH. 



Sate. 


Child. 


Father. Mother. 






Mary. 


Jonathan & Wife. 


Apr. 


4. 


William. 
Martha. 


Nathaniel 
Gershom 






25. 


Susannah, 


Nicolas 




May 


9. 


Cushing. 


Jonas 






30. 


Harriet. 
SabraJaquish, 


John 
} D. of Eldad 








Eliza Ann. 


;u 




June 


13. 


Emily. 


James 








John. 


John 






29. 


Mary. 


Thomas 




July 


4. 


Charles. 


Joseph 








Elisabeth. 


Richard 






11. 


Mary. 
Thomas Wm. 


James 
Thomas 






18. 


William. 


Samuel 




Aug. 


1. 


Lucy. 


Peter 








Elisabeth. 


Joseph 






20. 


Joshua. 


Joshua 






27. 


Widiam. 


Amos 








Mary. 


Timothy 




Sep. 


26. 


Thomas Oliver 
Joseph Oliver. 


Thos. O. 
Joseph 








Elisabeth Ann. 


John 








Rebecca. 


WilUam 




Oct. 


24. 


Reuben Hatch. 


Wait 








John. 


"William 








Catharine. 


David 




Nov. 


7. 


Thomas Wade 


Thomas 






14. 


Rhoda & Sewall, children of 


Sara] 




28. 


Mary & Rebecc 


a Cordis, daug 


hters 



Dec. 



12. 
19. 

2G. 
1S03. 
Jan. 2. 

16. 

23. 



Harriet. Isaac & Wife. 

Louisa. " 

A7in. Francis " 

Luther Johnson (adult). 
Luther. Luther & Wife. 

Prudence, daughter of Asa (adult). 
Lucy & Betsey. D's of Ilosea & Wife. 
Harriet. John P. & Wife. 

Isaac: Thomas; Susanna; children of Isaac & 7 
Wife. I 

William Turner, S. of John & Wife. 
Susannah. Joseph " 

Charlotte: Ann; Martha; childrenof Josiah& Wife 
Charles. Georcre tS: Wife. 



Family Name. 

Locke. 

Trask. 

Teal. 

Brown. 

Stetson. 

Stevens. 

Whiting. 

Warren. 

Thomas. 

Hooper. 

Miller. 

Carleton. 

Turner. 

Conant. 

Burdett. 

Jones. 

Read. 

Grover. 

Tufts. 

AValkcr. 

Larkin. 

Carter. 

"SA'alker. 

Cooper. 

Pratt. [1G4] 

Green. 

Stetson. 

Phillips. 

Thompson. 

Ilaswell. 

Carleton. 

Clarke. 

Hyde. 

Johnson. 

Johnson. 

Richardson. 

Ilildreth. 

Duncklee. 

Williams. 

Ruuey. 
Symonds. 
Bartlett. 
Bartlett. 



BAPTISMS, 1803. 



219 



Date 




Child. Father. Mother. 

Eliza. William & Wife. 




Family Name. 

Wiley. 






Katij D. & Moses S., children of Polydore & Wife 








(Negroes). 




Skillings. 






Daniel. Dan', (deceased) 


& Wife. 


Parker. 




30. 


Elisabeth Ann. Jedl- & Wife. 




INIorse. [165] 


Feb. 


6. 


Thomas. James, Jr. " 




Frothingham. 




13. 


Josiah Neiohall. William " 




Maxvpell. 




20. 


William Richards. John " 




Robbins. 




27. 


Daniel Parker. William " 




Wood. 


Mar. 


20. 


Benjamin. Benjamin " 
Mary Whittemore. Samuel " 




Brown. 
Jaques. 




28. 


John Hancock. John " 




Carter. 


Apr. 


10. 


Ahram; Charles; Betsey; Mary; 


children of ) 


T^'mnpiQ 






Abram & Wife (Negroes). 


.1. ± OfLXK.il.0* 




17. 


Stephen. David & Wife. 




Fosdick. 


May 


1. 


Danid, David " 
Joshua. Joshua " 




Edmands. 
Grover. 




15. 


3Iary Jane. Ebenezer " 
James. Joseph " 




Gage. 
Gould. 




23. 


David & Mary. John " 




Bradley. 


June 


5. 


Mary Tufts. Jonathan " 




Locke. 




20. 


Josiah. Joseph " 




Brown. 


July 


31. 


William. Timothy " 




Keith. 


Aug. 


U. 


William Calder. Timothy, Jr. ' ' 




Thompson. 


Sep. 


4. 


Jefferson. John " 
Adeline Elenor,}^^^^.^^ - 
Caroline Ann. j 


11 mos. old. 


Conn. 
Pratt. 




11. 


Eleazer Howard, adult. 
George. Joseph " 




Howard. 
Bird. 




25. 


Ann Rogers. Thomas 0. " 
Daniel. Daniel '• 




Larkin. [166] 
Leman. 


Oct. 


9. 


Catharine Adams. Lemuel " 
Mary. James ' ' 




Shepard. 
Warren. 




16. 


Hosea. Hosea " 




Hildreth. 




30. 


Nathan Augustine. Nathan " 
Sarah Tucksbury. John " 




Tufts. 
Pratt. 


Nov. 


13. 


Mary Ann. Gershom " 




Teal. 




27. 


Joseph Johnson. Isaac " 
Lucy. Nathaniel " 




Larkin. 
Trask. 


Dec. 


4. 


Henry. John " 




Edmunds. 




11. 


John, William ' ' 
John Hills. Otis '' 




Hay. 
Clap. 


1804. 


18. 


George Runey. John " 
Ann Catharine. Joseph " 




Turner. 
Read. 


Jan. 


8. 


Joshua Si Caroline. Henry " 




Stoddard. 



220 



RECORDS OF THE FIRST CHURCH. 



Jan. 


13. 




15. 




29 


Feb. 
Mar. 


12. 

26 

4 


Mar. 


11 
18 


Apr. 


1 
8 



15. 

29. 
May 13. 



27. 

June 3. 

10. 

10. 

24. 

July 8. 
Aiicr. 12. 



16. 
26. 



CTitld. Father. Mother. 

Eliza BarQ)ter, D. of Calvin Sanger by Mary 
Thayer, presented by Jacob Sanderson & 
Wife. 

Susannah Niles. D. of Xath'. Fred^ & AA'ife. 

Margaret. D. of Joseph & Wife. 

Sarah Page. Thomas " 

Lois. Joseph " 

Elisabeth Ann. Sam". " 

Martha Washington. D. of Tim° & Wife. 

Ehenezer, \ twin children of 

Eliza Ann Pratt. I EbenT & AVife. 

Eldad. Eldad & Wife. 

Elisabeth Willington ; Mary Shepard ; Margaret ; 
Rhoda ; Thomas; William; Ruthij ; Anne; 
Jonathan; children of Jonathan & Margarett. 

Anthony. S. of Amos & Wife. 

John; Edward; Abigail Wallace; Mary; Josiah 
Willington ; children of John Goodwin & Polly 
his Wife, baptised on her account. 

Samuel Frothingham, S. oE Amos & Wife. 

Elisabeth. Jonah & Wife. 

Edward. Robert " 

Lydia, wife of Samuel Etheridge 

Emily; Samuel; Harriet; Lydia; Mary; John; 
Nancy ; children of Samuel & Lydia. 

Thomas. S. of I'homas & Wife. 

Ann Rebecca. Joseph " 

Isaac : Eben ; William Taylor ; children of Row- 
land & Hannah. 

Thomas. S. of John & Wife. 

Seth Downs. Seth " 

Ann Rogers; Maria; Harriet; 
Ebenezer & Wife Leah. 

John Stanton. Thomas & Wife. 

Henry. Dijah " 

Mahitahel. Kicolas " 

Sarah Newhall. Joshua " 

Elisaheth Reed. Thomas Brown & Wife 

Caroline Phillips 

Daniel Colcord, 

Jonathan Clark. 

Emerson. S. of Simon & Wife. 

Katharine Henley. D. of John P. & Wife. 

Hannah Maria. John & Wife. 

Betsey Lewis. Wife of Melzar Holmes. 



children of 



children of John P. & his 
Wife Louisa. 



Family Name. 

> Sanger. 

Thayer. 

Parker. 

Osgood. 

Babb: 

Allen. 

Walker. 

Thompson. 
Whiting. [167] 



Larrabee. 
Pollard. 



Goodwin. 

Tufts. 

Stetson. 

Calder. 



Etheridge. 

Hooper. 

Carter. 

Center. 

Conn. 

Lawrence. 

[168] 
Wade. 
Edes. 
Bowen. 
Brown. 
Hooper. 
Reed. 

Payson. 

Hunt. 
Duncklee. 
Skinner. 
Holmes. 



BAPTISMS, 1805. 



221 



Date. 



Child. 
Eliza Lewi) 



Father. 
Beal, "j 



Mother. 



Mary Beal, 1 Children of Melzar 

Gustavus Melzar, \ Holmes & Wife. 
Augustus Spencer, j 



Family Name. 



Holmes. 



Sep. 


2. 


Caroline. D. 


of Isaac & Wife. 


Carlton. 




30. 


Geo. Washinglo 


n. Lebbeus 


i( 


Curtis. 


Oct. 


14. 


Joseph Lee. 


Stephen 


<i 


Twycrofs. 


Nov. 


11. 


Eleanor Neismi 


'th. D. of John & Mary. 


Rogers. 






Martha. D. of Sam". Goodwin & Wife. 


Twycrofs. 


Dec. 


2. 


John Green. S. of John & Wife. 


Burdett. 






Samuel. 


Sam'. 


u 


Jaques. 






Ann Rogers. 


Thos. 0. 


i( 


Larkin. 






Ann. 


William 


u 


Wood. 




23. 


Charles Trowbridge. S. of Artemas & Wife. 


Ward. 






Francis. 


Francis & 


Wife. 


Hyde. 






Mary. 


William 


«( 


Maxwell. 






Diana Staples. 


Jonathan 


(( 


Locke. 


[169] 


30. 


Sally. 


W^illiam 


(> 


Green. 


1805. 




Elisabeth Ann. 


Dani 


(( 


Leman. 


Jan. 


5. 


Eliza. 


Luther. 


t( 


Johnson. 




20. 


Thomas Jefferson. James 


(( 


Turner. 


Feb. 


3. 


Charles. 


George. 


(( 


Bartlett. 




17. 


David. 


David 


ti 


Barker. 






Isaac. 


Lemuel 


(( 


Shepard. 






Mary. 


William 


(( 


Cooper. 




24. 


Miles Standish. 


Archelaus 


(( 


Flint. 


Mar. 


17. 


Henry. 


Henry 


<( 


Stoddard. 






Ann. 


David 


(( 


Stetson. 




24. 


William Lane. 


John 


(i 


Turner. 






Mary Jane. 


Samuel 


t( 


Allen. 






Mary Webb. 


Ashur 


t( 


Adams. 




31. 


Willard.. 


Willard 


i( 


Clark. 


Apr. 


7. 


I^ouisa. 


Gershom 


<t 


Teel. 




14. 


Mary Ann Colder. Tim", Jr 


(( 


Thompson. 


May 


12. 


David Stearns. 


David 


(( 


Devens. 






Charles. 


Jotham 


(i 


Johnson. 


June 


2. 


Louisa. 


Benj. 


u 


Brown. 




30. 


Selphronia. 


Ebenezer 


(( 


Gage. 


July 


14. 


James Oaks. 


Charles 


(( 


Bradbury. 




21. 


Martha. 


John 


i c 


Goodwin. 


Aug. 


22. 


Hannah. 


Edmund 


" (both deceased). 


Johnson. 




25. 


John. 


John 


ti 


Skinner. 






Mary. 


Thomas 


u 


Osgood. 


Sep. 


1. 


Juliane. 


Amos 


u 


Pollard. 






Anne Adams. 


Benjamin 


(( 


Gage. 



O09 



EECORDS OF THE FIRST CHURCEI. 



Date. 


Child. 


Father. Mother. 




Family Name. 


Oct. 


6. 


Elisabeth Ann. 


Cotton & Wife. 




Center. [170] 






Harriet Jane. 


Joseph 






Reed. 






Catharine. 


AVait 






Pratt. 




12. 


Josiah. 


Josiah 






Harris. 






Mary. 


Robert 






Sifson. 




27. 


ZahdielBoylston. ZabdielB. 






Adams. 


Nov. 


1. 


George, Andrew; Charles; 
of Andrew & Wife. 


Harriet 


children 


Stimpson. 




3. 


Caroline. 


Thomas & Wife. 




Edes. 






Joseph. 


Joseph 






Parker. 




10. 


Rob'. Nathaniel. 


Robert 






Levering. 




17. 


Samuel. 


Samuel 






Stoddard. 


Dec. 


1. 


Ecelina. 


Robert 






Calder. 




8. 


Elmira Jeffersoi 


. John 






Conn. 






Anna Melora. 


Ammi R. 






Tufts. 






Hannah Burditt 


David 






Edmands. 




15. 


Ann Rebecca. 


John. 






Thomas. 






Lucy. 


Nathaniel 






Trask. 




22. 


Caroline. 


John 






Pratt. 




29. 


John. 


Samuel 






Goodhue. 


1806. 




Lucinda. 


Otis 






Clap. y 


Jan. 


5. 


Polly Jackson ; I^ydia Hollis ; 


Catherine; Solomon; 


^ 






Sarah Jackson ; children of Solomon & AVife. 


Norton. 




12. 


Jonathan Howe, 


adult. 






Howe 


1806. 


Jan 


. 19. Mary. 


Rowland & Wife. 




Center. [171] 




26. 


Sabra Jaqiiish. 


Eldad 






Whiting. 






Jonathan Frost. 


Jon? , Jr. 






Locke. 






Abigail. 


AVilliam 






Cooper. 


Feb. 


9. 


Isaac Carter. 
John Winn. 


Isaac 
INIoses B. 






Mead. 
Walker. 




23. 


Henry. 


Dijah 






Bowen. 


Mar. 


2. 


Catharine Henley. John 






Soley. 






Joseph. 


Joseph 






Wilson. 




20. 


Abigail 


David 






Fosdick. 




23. 


Isaac Wait. 






[ adults. 


Wait. 






Caleb Thayer, & his Wife, Deborah. 


Thayer. 






Elisabeth Ann. 


D. of James & Wife. 




Warren. 






Samuel Edward 


Samuel 






Cutter. 






Isaac Benjamin 


Isaac 






Wait. 




30. 


Mary Ann Gray. Joseph 






Shepard. 






Mary. 


Daniel 






Leman. 






Stephen Edmands. Sara'. 






Burdet. 


Apr. 


13. 


Abigail Goodwin. Saml Goodwin & Wife. 


Twycrofs. 


May 


4. 


Charles. Tim' 


& Wife. 






Walker. 




11. 


John; Archibald 


; Josiah , children of John & Wife 


Bennoch. 



BAPTISMS, 1806. 



223 



[nn. ) 



children of Robert & Wife. 



Date. Child Father. Mother. 

May IS. Benjamin Hastings. S. of Widow. 

Manj Heald. 1). of William & Wife. 
25, Mary Oliver, adult. 

Richard Boylston. S. of John & Wife. 

Mary, 

Eliza A 
[172] June 15. Elisha. S. of Melzar & AVife 
22. Caroline. Thatcher " 

Thomas Maudlin. Isaac " 

Martha. Joseph " 

Sarah Ann, 

Henrietta. 

Elisabeth Ann,} children of Asa Webster Chicb 

IMartha Vinal. ) ering & Wife. 

Sarah Wood Henley. ) 

Lydia Ann Ford. ) 

Isaac Kendall, adult. 

Edward. S. of Amos & Wife. 

Harriet; Rebecca; Thomas; children of Jacob & 
Joanna. 

Harriet; Mary Ann; Helen; children of Daniel 
& Wife. 

Caroline. D. of Mrs. Persis Homes (Boston). 

Madeline Octavia. D. of Sam'. & Wife. 

Joseph. Joseph & Wife. 

Mary Webster, D. } children of Mary Payson,W? 
[no name], S. J 

Sam^. Garjield. S. of Sam! & AVife. 



29. 



July 1. 



6. 



13. 



17. 

17. 

20. 

27. 
Aug. 31. 



Timothy 



adults. 



Sep. 14. 



28. 
Oct. 5. 
[173] 19. 



26. 

28. 

Nov. 9. 



Matthew ' ' 

Sam'. 

Lebbeus " 

John " 

Timothy " 

Edward " 

Isaac Call " 

Lot " 

Isaac " 

Eben^ " 
Rebecca Webster, offered by MlL& Mrs. Thompson. 
David Tilton. S. of David & Wife. 
Nicholas. Nicholas " 

Francis. Oliver " 

Charles. Benj. " 

Charles Auf/ustus Carpenter. S. of Joseph & Wife. 
Solomon. Solomon & Wife. 



Mattheio. 
Helen Lucinda. 
Susanna Wallan. 
John Frederick. 
Caroline. 

Catharine Rebecca. 
Mary Ann. 
Alexis. 
Richard. 
Hannah Gage. 



Family Name. 

Whitmarsh. 
Wood. 
Oliver. 
Edmands. 

Kathrius. 

Holmes. 
Goddard. 
Larkin. 
Brown. 

Fafsett. 

> Chickering. 

Henley. 
Ford. 
Kendall. 
Tufts. 

[■ Brown. 

[ Scott. 

Homes. 

Etheridge. 

Adams. 

Pay son. 

Allen. 
Skilton. 
Jaques. 
Curtis. 
Skinner. 
Thompson. 
Goodwin. 
Frothingham. 
Pool. 
Carleton. 
Thompson. 
AVebfter. 
Moors. 
Brown. 
Keating. 
Brown. 
Carter. 
Hovey. 



224 



EECOEDS OF THE FIRST CHURCH. 



Date. 




30 


Dec. 


7 




14 


1807 




Jan. 


18. 




25 


Feb. 


15 



16. 





22. 


Mar. 


1. 




8. 




15. 




22. 


[174] 




Apr. 


5. 



12. 



19. 



June 


28 




7. 




14. 




21 


July 


5 




23 


Aug. 


9. 



Father. Mother. 


Family Name. 


Gershom & Wife. 


Teel. 


Joseph " 


Williams. 


John " 


Burditt. 


Francis ' ' 


Hyde. 



Child. 
Gershom. 
Mary Ann. 
Hannah Pine. 
Sophia. 

Elisabeth, y Children of William Hobby & \ 

Abigail Anstus, > Wife, both deceased, & offered > Ilobbey. 
George. ' in baptism by their Grand- > 

mother, Abigail Powars. 
Elisabeth. D. of Abraham R. & Wife. Thompson 

Mary Bradford. Archelaus " Flint. 

Mary Rufsell. Jed^ " Morse. 

George. Jotham " Johnson. 

Je/se Oaks. Jefse (deceased) " Davidson. 

Hannah. John P. " Duncklee. 

George, \ children of Abraham R. Thomp- \ 

Thomas Hunt. ) son & Wife. ) 

Elisabeth Miller, D. of David & Wife. 
Thomas Abbot. Thomas " 

Mary. Luther " 

Mary Lawrence. John " 



16. 



Charles Austin. " 

William Vinal. Jonas " 

Alice. Wife of Ebenezer. 

Matthew Bridge. S. of Eben! & Alice. 

Robert. Robert & Wife. 

David. David " 

Mary Haswell. John W. " 

Amelia Ann. " " 

Walter Palmer, & his Wife, Elisabeth, adults. 

Walter William. S. of Walter & Wife. 

Amasa ; Pamela; Elisabeth; children of Amasa 

& Peggy Porter. 
Margaret; Wm. Nelson; James Augustus ; do 
IF"' Mattocks Rogers, S. of Thos. O. & Wife. 
Eunice & Samuel, children of W°. Caldwell. 
William. S. of William & Wife. 
Amanda. Robert " 

Henry Knox. James K. " 
Elisabeth Ann Morse. D. of Tim? & Wife. 
Matthew William. S. of Amos & Wife. 
Mary. Benj. " 

Sarah. Wife of Elihu Janes. 7 

Albert Henry. S. of Elihu & Wife, i 
Hannah Matilda. Sam'. " 

Mary Ru/sell. John " 



Thompson. 

Devens. 

Osgood. 

Johnson. 

Gregory. 

Turner. 

Stetson. 

Baker. 

Baker. 

Sifson. 

Stetson. 

Langdon. 

do. 
Palmer. 
Palmer. 

Porter, 
do. do. 
Larkin. 
Caldwell. 
Maxwell. 
Calder. 
Frothingham. 
Walker. 
Pollard. 
Ainger. 



Janes. 

Kidder. 
Soley. 



BAPTISMS, 1808. 



225 



Date. 


Child. 


Father. Mother. 






Catharine Bifsell. Ashur & AV if e . 






Olicer Keating. 


Dixey " 


Sep. 


6. 


Nancy Beai'd. 


Eben^ " 


[175] 


13. 


Nancy Farwell. 


HendiickW. " 




20. 


William. 


James " 






Mary Turell. 


John " 




22. 


George. 


George " 




26. 


Mary Barton. 


Walter " 


Oct. 


4. 


William Henry. 


S. of John & Wife, 




11. 


Hannah; Mary 


; Susan; Elmira; An 






of Saml & Rebecca. 






Jacob. S. of John & Wife. 




19. 


Agnes. 


William " 


Nov. 


1. 


David. 


David " 




8. 


Abigail Riggs. 


Joseph " 






Margaret. 


Eldad 






Ann Austin. 


Josiah " 




22. 


Ashbel. 


Isaac " 




30. 


Charles. 


Dijah " 


Dec. 


6. 


Joseph. 


Joseph " 




20. 


Susanna Dexter 


. David " 



Family Name. 
Adams. 
Wilds. 
Gage. 
Gordon. 
Turner. 
Thomas. 
Kew. 
Palmer. 
Skinner. 






Adeline. Moses B. " 

Elisabeth Jones. Robert " 
Susannah Kettell. 'Enoch *' 

27. Edward. Samuel " 
1808. Mary Radford Murray. D. of John & Wife. 
Jan. 11. Rebecca Parker. Wife of James. 

Ruth. D. of W? Sarah Hadley. 

James Winthr op. S. of James & Wife. 
17. Ann Catharine. John " 

31. Isaac. William " 

Feb. 14. George Storer. Joseph, Jr. " 

Mai-y Larkin. George " 

21. Henry. S. of Thomas & Wife. 

28. Rachel Coddington, } children of Nathl ) Thaver 
Nathaniel Frederick Niles. > Thayer & Wife. ) 

Mar. 6. Robert. S. of Robert & Wife. Kathrines. 

Apr. 3. Elenor. John " Pratt. 

George Washington^ \ children of John Boltou ) j>qUq„ 
Thomas Jefferson. ) & Wife. 3 

24. Henry. Rowland & Wife. Center. 

Benjamin Webster. Benj. " Gage. 

Abigail Frothingham. Joseph " Parker. 

Mary. D. of William & Wife (deceased). Hobbey. 

8 yrs. old, presented by her Grandmother, IMrs. Powars. 



Banner. 

Cooper. 

Woodward. 

Whitteraore. 

AVhiting. 

Harris. 

Wait. 

Bowen. 

Shephard. 

Barker. 

Walker. 

Lovering. 

Hunt. 

Soley. 

Edmands. 

Nichols. 

Hadley. 

Nichols. 

Goodwin. 

Austin. 

Adams. 

Silvester 

Kettell. 



226 



RECORDS OF THE FIRST CHURCH. 



Date. 


Child. Father. Mother. 


Family Name. 


May 


22. 


Mary Deals. D. of Melzar & \Vife. 


Holmes. 


June 


2G. 


Lewis Sargent, adult. 


Sargent. 






Eliza Ann Junes. D. of Lewis & Wife, 


Sargent. 






George. S. of Samuel & Wife. 


Burditt. 






Eliza. Joseph " 


AVilson. 


July 


3. 


Edward Mirick. William " 


Wood. 




24. 


Emily. Tim°_, Jr. 


Thompson. 






Roxanna. Jonathan " 


Howe. 




31. 


John. Sam'. " 


Haynes. 


Aug. 


7. 


Alice Caroline. Isaac " 


Mead. 




14. 


Peter Cushnan. Peter " 


Jones. 




28. 


Benj. Muzzy. Isaac " 


Carleton. 




(( 


Charlotte Elizabeth. D. of John W. & Wife. 


Langdon. 


Sep. 


18. 


James Gregory. James & Wife 


Warren. 






Charles. David, Jr. " 


Edmands. 






Elholinda. Lot " 


Pool. 




25. 


Sam\ Putnam. Matthew " 


Skelton. 






Susannah. Amos " 


Haggett. 


[177] 




Joseph Warren. Joseph " 


Read. 


Oct, 


2. 


John Webster. S. of Widow Anna H. 


Chickering. 






Edward. Benjamin & Wife. 


Brown. 




9. 


John Call. George " 


Bartlett. 






George & Lucy Johnson, twins of Tim? & Wife. 


Walker. 






John James. John & Wife. 


Soley. 






Betsey Holt. Joseph " 


Brown. 




23. 


Samuel. Thomas " 


Osgood. 


Nov. 


6. 


Israel Jenkins. Isaac " 


Larkin. 






Samuel. David " 


Devens. 






Mary Frothingham. Lebbeus & Wife. 


Curtis. 


Dec. 


11. 


William. Nicholas " 


Brown. 




18. 


Lucena Williams. Jonas " 


Stetson. 






Mary Hurd. John " 


Skinner. 




25. 


Sa7-ah Rebecca. Jedidiah " 


Morse. 


1809. 




Hannah Burdit. Caleb " 


Sweetser. 


Jan. 


1. 


Elisabeth Maria. Francis " 


Hyde. 




17. 


Jeremiah Bowers, } Twin children of Abraham R 
Abraham Rand. ) & Wife. 








Thompson. 




29. 


CaroVme. D. of Archelaus & Wife. 


Flint. 


Feb. 


19. 


Sarah Ann. Amasa " 


Porter. 




26. 


Maria. Dijah " 


Bowen. 


Mar. 


12. 


Mary Ballard Rogers. Sam'. '* 


Kidder. 






Irene. Jonathan, Jr. *' 


Locke. 


Apr. 


9. 


Edward EppesEllery. John " 


Burditt. 






Charles Whittemore. Sam'. •' 


Jaques. 






Elisabeth Gray. Ilcndrick W. " 


Gordon. 



tf 



BAPTISMS, 1809. 



227 



Date. 

Apr. 23. 
28. 
[178] 
May 7. 

14. 
21. 



13. 



10. 

24. 

Oct. 1. 

22. 

30. 

Nov. 5. 

12. 



Dec. 3. 

29. 
1810. Feb, 

11. 
Apr. 15. 
May 20. 
June 17. 

24. 
June 24. 



Child. Father. Mother. 

Juliana. Ebenezer & Wife. 

Henry Luce. Silas & Nancy. 

born in Charlestown, Jan. 30, 1809. 
Catharine. D. of Robert & Wife. 



Abigail Whitney. 

Ruth. 

George Adams. 

George Frederick. 

George Reed. 

Hannah Carey. 

Caroline Ann. 

Samuel. 

Susan. 



Alford 

David 

Thomas 

AVilliam 

Luther 

Robert 

Solomon 

Robert 

Samuel 



Joseph Read, adult in the States Prison. 
John Watts, \ children of Phinehas & 
William Gray. ) by Dr. Holmes. 
Jotham. S. of Jotham " 

Mary Little. John " 

Elmira Webster. D. 
Frances. Robert " 

Elisabeth Ann. Edward " 

Susannah Whittemore. D. ofTim° " 



Wife, 



Harriet. 
Charlotte. 
Charles Jarvis. 
Moses Breck. 
Uriah. 
John, 
Joseph Scott. 



John 

John 

Elihu 

Isaac 

Amos 

John 

Joseph 



Catharine. Wife of Giles Alexander. 
Deborah Vinal, adult. 
George. S. of Charles & Wife. 

Henry Augustus. Tim? " 

Joanna. Jacob " 

4. Eben Austin. Saml G. " 

John M'^Clure. Joseph " 

Gustavus Melzer. Melzer " 

Marshall Hutcheson. Jon* " 

David Stearns. David " 

Hannah Louisa Cary. John " 

John Sprague. S. of David & Wife. 
Mary Ann. Timothy " 

Sarah Brooks. Jacob " 

Andrew Bradshaw. James " 

Elisabeth Carter. Isaac '* 



Family Name. 

Baker. 
Dean. 

C alder. 

Skelton. 

Stetson. 

Kettle. 

Maxwell. 

Johnson. 

Sifson. 

Hovey. 

Kathrines. 

Cutter. 

Read. 

• Wheelock. 

Johnson. 
Turner. 

Lovering. 

Cutter. 

Tufts. 

• Gregory. 
Rogers. 
Janes. 
Wait. 
Pollard. 
Mitchell. 
Trevett. 

Vinal. 
Bradbury. 
Walker. 
Brown. 
Twycrofs. [179] 
Whittemore. 
Holmes. 
Locke. 
Devens. 
Soley. 
Barker. 
Tufts. 
Felt. 
Kidder. 
Mead. 



228 



RECORDS OF THE FIRST CHURCH. 



Date. 


Child. 


Father. Mother. 


Family Name. 


June 


3. 


Josiak Brown, adult (a Prisoner 


in States Pris( 


m). 


Aug. 


26. 


James. S. 


of John & Wife. 


Pratt. 


Sep. 


2. 


Hannah. 


Rowland 


1 1 


Center. 






Alary Ann. 




(( 


Anger. 




26. 


Georr/e. 


Jacob 


i( 


Sanderson. 


Oct. 


U. 


Abraham Rand. 


Abraham R 


(( 


Thompson. 






Joseph. 


Francis 


(( 


Hyde. 






Mary Eaton. 


Benjamin 


a 


Brown. 




27. 


Augustus. 


JSIatthew 


(( 


Skelton. 






Elbert. 


Reuben K. 


(( 


Blanchard. 


Nov. 


18. 


James Augustus. 


Thomas 


(( 


Kettell. 






Abijah Wyman. 


Abijah 


(( 


Hovey. 




25. 


Samuel. 


Thomas 


(( 


Osgood. 






John Oliver. 


Joseph 


(( 


Brown. 






John Austin. 


John 


<( 


Tufts. 


Dec. 


23. 


Catharine Maria l] 


^ard. Lemuel 


(( 


Bracket. 




30. 


Hannah Matilda. 


D. of Sam». 


ii 


Kidder. 


1811. 


Jan. 6. Sarah Stoddard. Isaac 


(( 


Blanchard. 




27. 


George. 


Robert 


(( 


Lovering. 


Mar. 


3. 


Samuel. S. 


of Saml 


u 


Jaques. [180] 






Charles. 


Isaac 


n 


Larkin. 




10. 


Catharine Rolerts. 


Giles 


a 


Alexander. 






Harriet. 


Benj. 


i( 


Gage. 




17. 


Josiah Edwin. 


John 


(( 


Skinner. 






Archelaus. 


Archelaus 


(( 


Flint. 


Apr. 


14 


Martha Edes, adult. 




Edes. 






Mary Foster. D. 


of iMichael 


(( 


Brigden. 






Martha Maritt. 


WilUam 


(( 


Maxwell. 






Aaron Smith Willington. John 


(( 


Goodwin. 


May 


5. 


Sophia Rebecca. 


Edward 


(( 


Cutter. 


June 


2. 


Henry. 


Isaac 


(( 


Warren. 




16. 


Elisabeth May. 


Peter 


(( 


Jones. 




30. 


Aaron. 


Nicholas 


i( 


Brown. 






Edward. 


Joseph 


i( 


Parker. 


Aug. 


11. 


Sarah Ann Wright 


Amasa 


it 


Porter. 




18. 


John Pope. 


Robert 


<( 


Calder. 




30. 


Eleanor. 


David 


(( 


Stetson. 


Sep. 


1. 


Elisabeth Ann. 


Samuel 


(( 


Kugg- 






Andreio Kettell. 


Enoch 


<( 


Hunt. 




22. 


Martha Story. 


Solomon 


t( 


Hovey. 


Oct. 


0. 


Catharine. 


Eldad 


(( 


Whiting. 


Nov. 


3. 


Hezekiah Woodbridge. Ashur 


(( 


Adams. 




17. 


Elisabeth Bartlett. 


William & 


IMary. 


Pratt. 






Reuben. 


Joseph & Wife. 


Reed. 


Dec. 


1. 


Joanna. 




It 


Kidder. 



BAPTISMS, 1812. 



229 



Date. 


Child. Father. Mother. 


Family Name. 


Dec. 


8. 


Geraldlne. D. of Lot & Wife. 


Tool. 




15. 


Alice Bruce. Joseph " 


Whittemore. 


1812 


.29. 


Richard. David *' 


Devens. 


Jan. 


5. 


George Frederick. Simeon " 


Flint. 


Mar. 


15. 


Sally. Wife of Seth Knowles, adult. 


Knowles. 






Joseph. S. of Seth & Wife. 


Knowles. 


[isr 




Thomas Sumner. Benjamin " 


Anger. 




22. 


George. Robert " 


Lovering. 


Apr. 


5. 


William Burroughs. Barny " 


Edmands. 




12. 


Elisabeth. Jeremy " 


Wilson. 




26. 


Rebecca. Sam'. " 


Haynes. 






Elisabeth Loring. Jacob " 


Felt. 


May 


24. 


Olioer Carter. Saml '• 


Cutter. 






Susa7inah Elisabeth. John " 


Skinner. 




31. 


Sarah Rufiell. John 


Soley. 


July 


26. 


Alary Gardner. James ** 


Nichols. 


Aug. 


30. 


Mary; Sarah; Maria; George; Charles; chil- 








dren of Arnold & Wife. 


Merryfield. 




31. 


Elihu. S. of Elihu & Wife. 


Janes. 


Sept. 


13. 


Samuel. Thomas " 


Osgood. 




20. 


James Lingan. Abraham R. " 


Thompson. 






Albert & Amellne, children of Joseph & Wife. 


Phipps. 




27. 


Abijah Wyman. S. of Abijah & Wife. 


Wyman. 


Oct. 


4. 


Elisabeth Clap. Michael " 


Brigden. 




10. 


George Edwin. David, Jr. " 


Edmands. 




25. 


George Gardner. S. of Gardner H. " 


Rand. 


Nov. 


8. 


Eliza Harris, adult. 


Harris. 






Pamela. D. of Matthew " 


Skelton. 






Wymond. S. of Charles " 


Bradbury. 






Samuel. Samuel II. " 


Bradstreet. 


Dec. 


6. 


James Fordyce. Archelaus " 


Flint. 




13. 


Sarah. John " 


Mitchell. 


[1813 


;]27. 


Alfred. Alfred " 


Skilton. 


Jan. 


3. 


Joseph Jackson, presented by W? Larkiu. 


Jackson. 


Feb. 


7. 


Edward. S. of Benj. & Wife. 


Brown. 




14. 


Elisabeth. Jacob " 


Brown. 






Vrylena. D. of Isaac " 


Blanchard. 


[182] 


21. 


Josiah. S. of Josiah & Susan (W°). 


Thompson. 


Apr. 


4. 


John Jay. Jeremiah & Wife. 


Evarts. 






Sarah. Samuel " 


Kidder. 




11. 


Catharine. y 


Phinney. 


May 


16. 


George. S. of Joseph " 


Wilson. 


June 


13. 


William. William S. " 


Phipps. 




27. 


Charles Gage. Ebcn^ " ■ 


Thompson. 



230 



RECORDS OF THE FIRST CHURCH. 



Date. 
July 18. 
Aug. 1. 



Child. 
Abigail Burclit. 
Abigail. 
Edward Pratt. 
David. 
Adeline; Enoch; 



Father. Mother, 

David & Wife. 
John, Jr. " 
John " 

Joseph '* 
Thomas; Edward Dorr; Na- 



15. 
22. 



Sep. 12. 
19. 
26. 

Oct. 3. 
9. 

Nov. 14. 
[183] 

28. 

Dec. 26. 
1814. Jan 

28. 

30. 
Feb. 20. 

27. 
Apr. 10. 

17. 



24. 



thaniel Coolidge ; James ; children of Enoch & 
Sukey. 

of Francis & Wife. 

WilUam " 

Arnold " 

David " 

David " 

Phinehas " 
S.ofEldad " 

Isaac " 



Moses. 

Julian. 

Catharine Putnam. 

Eleanor. 

George Adams. 

Charles Fisher Ames 

Williarn Henry. 

Mary Johnson. 



Benjamin Eurd. 
Elisabeth Cary. 
9. Mary Lamson 



John. Joel " 

Joseph " 
George Washington. Isaac " 

William. ' Samuel " 

Elihu. Elihu " 

Nehemiah Wyman, adult. 
Susan Stearns. D. of Nehemiah, Jr. & Wife. 
Octavus Augustus. John W. & Wife. 
Octavious Plummer. Abraham R. " 

John *' 

Sam'. " 

Jacob ' ' 

Andrew Rufsell (adult, a negro (died 29''"). 
Lot Haven. S. of Lot & Wife. 
Sam\ Tujls. Seth " 

George. Enoch *' 

Albert. Enoch " 

Susannah Farnsworth, the mother, & 
Susannah Floyd; Elisabeth; Thomas Hovey ; 

William Jenkins ; children of W° Susannah. 
Rebecca Parker. D. of James & AVife. 
Hannah Emily. D. of Ruth Rogers (widow). 
S. of Dijah & Wife. 

Robert " 

Gardner " 
William Stearns " 

Gilbert " 

Simeon " 

Eben " 

Rowland *' 







William Flint. 


May 


22. 


Joseph . 




30. 


James Hovey. 


June 


5. 


Lucius. 




16. 


Abigail. 




19. 


Williain. 
Juliana. 


July 


3. 


Sa7-ah Taylor. 



Family Name. 

Barker. 
Tufts. 
Burdit. 
Brown. 



Hyde. 

Hyde. 

Wheeler. 

Merri field. 

Stetson. 

Devens. 

Cole. 

Whiting. 

Larkin. 

Moore. 

Read. 

Warren. 

Jaquith. 

Jane. 

Wyman. 

AVyman. 

Langdon. 

Thompson. 

Skinner. 

Soley. 

Felt. 

Rufsell. 

Pool. 

Johnson. 

Hyde. 

Hunt. 



Farnsworth. 

Nichols. 

Rogers. 

Bowen. 

Lovering. 

Rand. 

Phipps. 

Tufts. 

Flint. 

Baker. 

Center. 



f 



BAPTISMS, 1815. 



231 



Date. 


Child. 


Father. Mother. 


Family Name. 


July 10. 


George Wyllys. 


Ashur & Wife. 


Adams. 


17. 


Alfred Hall. 


Amasa " 


Porter. 


24. 


Caroline Elisabeth, 
George Mirik. 


> Gershom " 


Teel. 




Edward Townsend, 
Augustus. 


' [• Barnabas " 


Edmands. 


Oct. 9. 


Samuel Loring. 


Samuel " 


Raymond. 




Abigail. 


Thomas " 


Osgood. 


[184] 20. 


James Ru/sell. 


John " 


Soley. 


Dec. 4. 


Julia. 


Archelaus '* 


Flint. 



8. 
15. 



William; Catharine; Amelia; Charlotte; children 

of Abram & Wife (Negroes). 
William Fernald, adult. 
TFni. Raijnard ; Guy Carleton ; Sarah Carleton ; 

Mary Souther; children of William & Wife. 
Mary Cordelia Barker. } 

Charles Frederick Waldo. ) S. of Josiah H. & Wife. 
Margaret & Cornelia, twins of Sam'. & Wife. 
Caroline Harriet. D. of John & Wife. 



Martha Ann. 
Sa7'ah Rand. 
George Jenners. 
Charlotte. 
Elisabeth Bartlett 
Abigail Whitney. 



Caroline. 
Oliver Blood. 
Sarah Sherman. 
Harriet Caroline 
Mary Anne. 
Edward. 
Jonathan Oaks. 
Franklin. 
Samuel Gridley. 
Charles Oliver. 
Frederick. 



"f 



Solomon " 
Abraham R. " 
John " 

Samuel " 

Elias " 

Alfred " 

Phebe ; John Coolidge ; William Shepard ; chil- 
dren of Job & Wife. 
Maria; Sarah Webster ; Charlotte; children 
Peter & Wife. 

D. of John & Wife. 
Benj. *' 

Jeremiah " 
David " 

Gilbert " 
Nehemiah, Jr. " 
Charles " 
Jonas " 

Francis ' ' 
Elisha " 
S. of Arnold " 
Dolly Hildreth Robbins, adult. 
Sarah Howard. D. of Gardner & Wife. 
Catharine Hannah Adams. D. Presented by 

Nathan Adams & Wife. 
James. S. of Solomon & Wife. 



Francis. 



Fernald. 

Barker. 

Rugg. 

Skinner. 

Hovey. 

Thompson. 

Goodwin. 

Kidder. 

Phinney. 

Skelton. 

Richardson. 



Sawyer. 

Mitchell. 

Anger. 

Evarts. 

Edmands. 

Tufts. 

Wyman. 

Bradbury. 

Stetson. 

Hyde. 

Baker. 

Merrifield. 

Bobbins. 

Rand. 

Willard. 
Hovey. 



232 



RECORDS OF THE FIRST CHURCH. 



Date. 
Oct. 1. 

8. 
15. 
22. 

Dec. 10. 
17. 
[1816] 24. 
Jan. 7. 
Feb. 25. 

Mar. 31. 
Apr. 7. 
May 19. 



July 14. 

Aug. 25. 

31. 
Oct. 7. 
Nov. 10. 

17. 
Dec. 8. 

[1817] 
Jan. 12. 



Feb. 


9. 




23. 


Mar. 


9. 


Apr. 


13. 


INIay 


11. 



Child. Father. Mother. 

A mbrose Stanley. Eldad & Wife. 

Emma Perry, adult. 

Caleb Strong. S. of Benjamin & Wife. 
Sarah Barclay, 7 ^^^^^^^ ^^ j^^^ ^ ^^^^^ 



Amelia Ru/sell. ) 
George Biscoe. 
Job. 
Henry. 
Isaac Wilder. 
Edward Foster. 
Mary Pratt. 
John Austin. 
George Augustus. 
Henry Bradshaw. 
Elisabeth Maria. 
Charlotte Stearns. 
Angelina Stoddart 
Octavius Plumer. 
George. 
Charlotte. 
Sarah Hay. 
James Ru/sell. 
Susan Elisabeth. 
Maryan Souther. 



Jeremy & Wife. 
Job " 

Jolham " 
Isaac " 

Michael " 
Elias " 



Samuel " 

John " 

James " 

Joseph " 

David " 

W™ S. 

Abraham R. " 
S. of Dijah & Wife. 

Gershom " 

Benj. " 

S. of John " 

Enoch " 

William " 
Betsey Rugg, & Catharine Edes, adults. 
Catharine. D. of James & Wife. 

Frederick Mortimer. Elihu " 

Sarah Shattuck. Wife of Shadrack S. (adult). 
Hannah Mead. " Sam'. (do.). 

Evelina Hull ; Frances Read; Mary Richardson (adults). 
Charles Samuel. S. of Sam'. & Wife. Mead. 

Sarah Johnson; Lydia Tufts Perry ; Eliza Skimmer (adults). 
Herryman; Sarah; Polly; children of Jonathan 



Family Name. 

Whiting. 

Perry. 

Brown. 

Rogers. 

Wilson. 

Richardson. 

Johnson. 

Blanchard. 

Brigden. 

Phinney. 

Twycrofs. 

Skinner. 

Kidder. 

Reed. 

Devens. 

Phipps. 

Thompson. 

Bowen. 

Teel. 

Gage. 

Soley. [186] 

Hunt. 

Fernald. 

Rugg; Edes. 

Warren. 

Janes. 

Shattuck. 

Mead. 



Wife of Thomas B. 



& Wife. 
Linless Rand 
Mary Jackson. 
Eliah Parker M<^Intire. 
Pamela Martin. 

Frederick Peabody, & his Wife, Rebecca 
Mary Winship. Wife of John. 
Rebecca Adams Campbell, \ 

Martha Ann Barrett Campbell. ) 
Anna Palmer. D. of William & Wife. 
Frederick A ndrew. 
Dexter S. 



Bridge. 

Rand. 

Jackson. 

M<=Intire. 

Martin. 

Peabody. 

Winship. 

Campbell. 

Wyraan. 
S., 4 yrs. old, ) children of Fi-ederick 
2 yrs. old. > & Wife. Peabody. 



BAPTISMS, 1818. 



233 



27. 



Child. 


Father. Mother. 


Family Name. 


Lydia Louisa; David; Samuel Eames ; Margaret 


) [187] 


Adams; Daniel 


Haskell; children of David 


) Low. 


Low & Wife. 




) 


George Albert. S. 


of Guy Carlton & Wife. 


Ilaynes. 


Ruth Rose, widow, 


& her son, Stephen. 


Rose. 


Harriet Tewkshury, 


adult. 


Tewkshury. 


Loammi. S. of Loammi & Wife. 


Dean. 


Harriet. D. of 


do. do. 


Dean. 


Susan Thompson. 


D. of Sam" & Wife. 


Kidder. 


James Bradish Whitney. Joseph & Hannah. 


Tufts. 


Charlotte Amelia. 


Ashur & Wife. 


Adams. 


William Henry. 


Josiah, Jr. " 


Barker. 


Sarah Spear ; Elisabeth Roioe : David Spear ; 


[• Ingersoll. 


children of David S. & Wife. 


Frances Martha. 


John " 


Skinner. 


Elbert. 


Abijah " 


Ilovey. 


Sophia. 


Nehemiah " 


Wyman. 


Oliver Jaquith. 


Eldad 


Whiting. 


Lydia Ann. 


Simeon " 


Flint. 


Samuel. 


Samuel " 


Rugg. 


Evelina. 


James " 


Kidder. 


Susannah Coolidge 


. Enoch " 


Hyde. 


Martha. 


Jeremy " 


Wilson. 


Mary Elisabeth. 


Charles " 


Bradbury. 


Gilbert. 


Gilbert " 


Tufts. 


Elisabeth Abbot. 


John " 


Win ship. 


Mary Leach. Wife of Thomas. 


Leach. [188] 


Mary Bradbury. Wife of Charles. 


Bradbury. 


James Bicknell. S 


i. of Thomas & Mary. 


Leach. 


Charles Forster. 


Charles F. & Wife. 


Waldo. 


Thomas. 


Benjamin " 


Brown. 


Matilda Ann. 


Lot " 


Pool. 


Harriet. 


Solomon " 


Hovey. 


Mary Reed. 


Loammi " 


Dean. 


Charlotte Louisa. 


Joseph " 


Reed. 


Gorham. 


Frederick " 


Peabody. 


3. John Langley. 


Dijah 


Bowen. 


Edward. 


David " 


Stetson. 


Eliza Larkin. Widow of Isaac. 


Larkin. 


Mary Ball. D. of Robert & Wife. 


Edes. 


Francis Prescott. 


S. ofElihu " 


Jane. 


William Bainbridge 
Elisabeth Ann. 


' 1 children of Peter & Wife. 


Sawyer. 


Samuel Rnfsell. S 


i. of Ben j. &Wife. 


Trevett. 


Ellen. 


Samuel " 


Kidder. 



234 



RECORDS OF THE FIRST CHURCH. 



Date. 


Child. Father. Mother. 


Family N.ome. 


July 


18. 


Eliza Harris. Simeon & Wife. 


Flint. 


Aug. 


1. 


Jonathan Oaka. Charles " 


Bradbury. 




8. 


Martha Capen, adopted daughter of Martha. 


Edmands. 


Sep. 


5. 


Maria. D. of Gera & Wife. 


Jenkins. 




12. 


Daniel Tufts. James 


Kidder. 






William. Enoch " 


Hunt. 




19. 


Edward Michael. Michael " 


Brigden. 


Oct. 


10. 


George. Benj" B. " 


Osgood. 






Susan Walker. D. of Sam' F. B. " 


Morse. 


Dec. 


11. 


Sarah Emily. " Chas. F. " 


Waldo. 






Sarah. " Jeremiah " 


Wilson. 



[//ere, at the foot of page 188, ends the Record of Baptisms kept by Rev. 
Jedidiah Morse, D.D. The Record is continued by Rev. Warren Fay, D.D., 
as follows : — ] 

of Joseph F. & Wife. Tufts. [189] 

Gilbert " 

John " 

Nehemiah & Susan. 
Jonathan & Wife. 
Eph. " 



1820. Apr. 2. Joseph. 

Sarah Johnson. 
John. 

Rebecca Hill. 
Catherine Ingersol. 
Margaret Ann. 



May 



23. 
14. 



June 11. 

18. 

25. 
July 9. 

Aug. 13. 



Sep. 



27. 



10. 



1821. 
Apr. 1 . 
8. 
May 13. 



June 



20. 
3. 



Elisabeth Phipps, & George, ch. of John & Wife. 



Tufts. 

Tufts. 

Winship. 

Wyman. 

Call. 

Bailey. 

Mitchell. 

Dean. 

Furnell. 

Edes. 

Richards 

Warren. 

Pool. 



Martha. Loammi & Wife. 

Abigail Dinnett. William " 

Sophia Briggs. Capt. Robert '* 

Henry Augustus. T. (?) B. " 

Harriot Gregory. James. " 

George Wakefield. Lot " 

John; Samuel Octavius ; George; children of the > ., 

Widow Polly. \ °™' 

Eliza Brooks; Loammi; Isaac; Mary Ann Roberts; 

ch. of Loammi & Nancy. Bap. on her account. Kendall 
Elisabeth Gibson; Martha Tenny; Phinehas; Lucinda 

Adams; Rebekah Dunn; Joseph; James Munroe; 



\. Baptised on his account. 



children of Joseph & Elisabeth. 
Mary Kettell. D. of Simeon & Wife. 
Clarissa Call. Benj. B. " 

Robert Gibson, ^ ^j^.^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^^ ^ ^.^^^ 
John Calvin, 
Sarah. 
Joseph Nickerson. S. of Joseph & Wife. 

Baptised on her account. 
Elisabeth Adams. D. of Ebenezer & Wife. 

Baptised on her account. 
Belinda Rebekah. D. of Frederick & Wife. 
William. Abijah " 



Underwood. 
Flint. [190] 
Osgood. 

Tinney. 



Phillips. 

Morse. 

Peabody. 
Hovey. 



BAPTISMS, 1822. 



235 



Child. Father. Mother. 

George. Eldad & Wife. 

Eliza A nn. D. of Enoch & Wife (bap. her a /ct. ) . 
Emily Goodwin. D. of Amos P. & Wife. 
Sophia Wtjatt. Wife of T. Wyatt. 
Joseph Falkner. S. of Solomon & Wife. 
Elisabeth, ) Ds. of John & Mary his Wife. 
Harriet. > on her account. 
Sarah, & John Willard ; ch. of Widow Mary. 
Angelina. D. of Lot & Wife. 
Joseph Gerrish. 

William Brooks; Alfred; Sons of Geo. G. & Ann, her 
Harriet At wood ; Moses; Otis Whiting; children 
of Joshua & Lydia Stowell, on her account. 
John Woodhridge. S. of William & Wife. 
Elisabeth Stevens. Nehemiah " 

SophiaWeston Jones. Adult. 

D. of Charles & Wife. 
Ashur " 

Jonathan 2^ " 
Loammi Kendall; Lydia Nichols ; Harriot Pierce ; 

Susanna Lewis ; 
Isaac Franklin. S . of Jos. & Wife (on her a/ct.). 
il/oses[?] Ames. Silvauus B. & Lucy. 

Loammi & Wife. 

Jesse 2^ " 

James " 

John " 

Ephraim " 

Gilbert & Wife (her a/ct.). 

Ebenezer & Wife. 

S. of Dea. M. Skilton & Wife. 

Eldad & Wife. 

Joseph F. " 

Wife of Clarke. 

Wife of 

Elisabeth D. Carr; Susan Waters; Hannah Dennis ; 
Mary Cutter; Lucy Jewitt ; Caroline M. Corson (?) 
Betsey Jewett ; Sarah Cade ; 
John; Henry; James; Elisabeth; Sarah; children 

of Chester & Elisabeth. 
Martha Breioster. Niece of C. Adams & Wife. 
James. S. of Rachel Niles, Widow. 
Samuel. S. of Samuel & Wife. 
Mary. D. of John " 

Sarah Gardner ; Relief Houghton ; Mary Ferrell ; 
Eliza Herrick i Charlotte Green. 



Jane Moody. 

Samuel. 

Phillippa. 



Charles Edwin. 
Benj. Paine. 
Ellis Usher. 
Mary. 

John Brooks, 
Caroline. 
Charles Edwards. 
Augustus Henry. 
Mary Jaquith. 
Henry. 

Hannah Cristy. 
Harriot Smith. 



Family Name. 

Whiting. 

Hyde. 

Hutchinson. 

Wyatt. 

Ilovey. 

Pierpont. 

Richardson. 

Pool. 
Gerrish. 
a/ct. Jones. 

Stowell. 

Birchmore. 

Wyman. 

Jones. 

Bradbury. 

Adams. 

Call. 



Phillips. 

Richards. 

Dean. 

Brown. 

Kidder. 

Winship. 

Bailey. 

Tufts. 

Morse. 

Whiting. 
Tufts. 
Cristy. 
Smith. 



[192] 



Adams. 

Brewster. 

Niles. 

Kidder. 

Mitchell. 



236 RECORDS OF THE FIRST CHURCH. 

Date. Child. Father. Mother. Family Name. 

July 20. James M^Kim ; Sarah ; Daniel ; Henry Perez (?) ; | p j 
[193] Catharine Dwight ; children of the Wid. Sarah. ) 

Sep. 28. Ahhy Ann. D. of Benjamin B. & Wife. Osgood, 

Elisabeth Johnson. D. of James & Susan. Eustis. 

Edwin. S. of Amos, Jr., & Wife. Tufts. 

Nov. 9. Lyman Peck; Lydia Baker ; Ruth Green Perry. 

Sarah; John; Thomas; ch. of Wid. Lydia. Baker. 

16. Edward Andrews. S. of Andrews & Susan. Breed. 

30. Jonas; LucyWyman; Charles; Susan; Louisana;}r} xi. 

children of Stephen & Lucy. ) 

Mary; Priscilla ; Lucy; children of Wid. Mary. Band. 

Martha Dennis. Dennis. 

Dec. 14. George; Adelaide; ch. of Enoch & Eliza. Cook. 

on her account. 

31. John Abbot. S. of John & Wife. Smith. 

1824. Feb. 8. Hannah Hacey. Hacey. 
Mch. 14. Sarah; Mary ; Caroline; Josiah Locke ; Shadrach;} c, ., , 

children of the Wid. Sarah. y 

Sarah A tin D. of Simeon & Hepzibah. Flint. 

Apr. 11. ElizaWoodberry. Woodberry. 

[194] Rebecca Skimmer. Skimmer. 

May 9. Thomas Sewall. S. of Thomas & Eliza. Woodberry. 

on her account. 

23. George Washington. S. of & Harriot. Smith. 

June 13. Jonas N. (or W. ?) Russell. Russell. 

Susan ; Lydia ; daughters of Wid. Lydia. Baker. 

July 18. William Cornelius. S. of William & Wife. Birchmore. 

Harriot. D. of Lot " Pool. 

Mary Frances. Nehemiah '* Wyman. 

Ann Maria, ) ^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^ .. ^^. 

William Clark, i ^ 

Catharine. D. of Jeremy & Nancy (on her a/ct.) . Wilson. 

Lucy Dunnells. Dunuells. 

Daniel Dlodget. S. of Robert & Wife. Tenny. 

Lucy Richardson. Richardson. 

Joseph Small. S. of Jesse & Wife. Brown. 

Henry Wykoff. George C. & Ann. On her acct. Jones. 

Frances Maria. D. of Saml & Wife (on her a ct.). Rugg. 

Caroline Reed. D. of Loammi & Hariot. Dean. 
Baptised sick at home, on her account. 
Dec. 26. James ; Timothy Bryant ; John Bryant ; Lucy Eaton ; 

children of James & Lucy. Bap on her account. Caldwell. 

1825. Jan. 9. Sarah Prentice. D. of Patty Trask. Trask. 
Mch. 13. Martha Chickering ; Otis Vinal ; Mary Ann Tufts ; 

children of Peter & Wife. Bap. on her ac- Sawyer, 
count, and at her house. 



4 



Aug. 
Sep. 


8 
12 


Oct. 


10 


Oct. 

Nov. 


17 
7 
6 



BAPTISMS, 1826. 



237 



Date. 
Apr. 10. 
May 1. 

[195] 29. 
June 12. 

July 3. 

24. 

Aug. 14. 



Nov. 18. 

Dec. 11. 

1826. Mch 

Apr. 2. 
9. 
June 19. 
July 2. 
Aug. 25. 
Sep. 10. 
Oct. 8. 



Child. Father. Jlother. 

Mary Ann. D. of E. P. & Mary. 

Kendall. S. of Ephraim & Wife. 

]]e7ij. Gould. Son of Benj. & Wife (her a ct.). 



Family Name. 

Mackintire. 

Bailey. 

Thompson. 

Perry. 

Jewett. 



Elisabeth R, Perry ; Rebecca Perrtj. 

Lydia Jewett. 

Sarah Scholfeild [?]. D. of Gilbert & Wife (her a,ct.). Tufts. 

Frances Elisabeth Lewis, given up by Lucy Dunnells. Lewis 



Sarah Frances. 
Henry Francis. 
Lucy Chaplin. 
Abigail Bradish. 



D. of Benj. & Wife. 
S. of W> C. 

D. of S. B. & Wife (her a/ct.). 
James & Wife. 



Brown. 

Cristy. 

Richards. 

Eustis. 

Tufts. 



Abigail. D. of Amos & Wife (her a/ct.). 

James : William Miller ; John Cutting ; George ; 

children of John M. & Wife. Bap. her a/ct. Robertson. 

Caroline Frances. D. of Ashur & Wife. Adams. 

.20. Frances Anna. D. of John " (her a/ct.). Winship. 

George Frederick. Joseph F. " Tufts. 

Samuel. Lot " Pool. 

Experience Holt. Elisabeth Gardner. Holt. Gardner. 

Charles Henry. S. of Andrews & Wife. Breed. 

Sarah Trask. D. of James & Lucy (her a/ct.). Caldwell. 

Sarah Payson. D. of Jon% 2d, & Wife. Call. 

Isaac. Nehemiah &, Wife (her a/ct.). Wyman. 

Sarah Jane. Charles " Bradbury. 

Mary Elisabeth. Philemon " Chandler. 

Eliza Ann, \ 

f children of the Wid. Experience. Holt. 



Oct. 29. 
Nov. 12. 
1196] 
Nov. 19. 
Dec. 18. 
1827. May 

July 8. 



15. 
22. 



Sep. 9. 



Jacob Varnum. 

George Frederick. S. of Ira & W^ife. Wadsworth. 

Moses. Job " Richardson. 

George Washington. John & Harriot. Smith. 

John Francis. S. of & Phebe. Sawyer. 

Josiah Thomas. Barnard & Wife. Collins. 

13. Reuben Page; Osgood Fijield ; Horace Everett ; 

Emily Gardner ; Mary Converse. 
Sarah Frances. D. of Benj. & Wife. Brown. 

James Wallace. Clark & Hannah. Cristy. 

Eleazer Fijield ; Thomas S. Mellen; Lydia Rand; 

Mary Holden ; Nancy Howe. 
Ann Eliza. D. of Ann. Underwood. 

Mary Ann; Pamelia ; John Henry; Caroline 

Maria ; ch. of Silas & Mary. 
Sarah Elisabeth; William Thomas; Hannah Belcher; r p , 

ch. of Wid. Lydia. 

Sarah Parker; Frances Gardner; 

Sarah Manninq, ) i •, i r ,» o t-. • 

_^ •' \ children of Moses & Eunice. 
Wdliam Dane. ) 



>■ Crane. 
Harris. 



238 



RECORDS OF THE FIRST CHURCH. 



Date. 

Sep. 30. 
[197] 
Sep. 30. 

Oct. 7. 
Nov. 11. 

18. 
1828. 
Feb. 10. 

21. 
Mch. 9. 

Apr. 13. 

27. 
June 29. 
July 13. 

30. 



Sep. 13. 
Oct. 5. 
1829. Mch, 
Apr. 12. 



Child. Father. Mother. Family Name. 

Susan Parker ; Caroline Matilda; W"' Bainbridge ; 

childreu of Nathl & Julia Ann. Bap. her a/ct. 

Isaac Tucker ; Mary Breck [?] ; Maria Prentice ; 

Georgiana Augusta ; children of Widow Deborah. 

Charles. S. of Lot & ^Vife. 

Eliza Belcher. Wife of John. 

Nancy Bradford ; Mary Ann WHkins ; Mary Walker. 

Lucy Elcira. D. of Danl G. & Wife (her a/ct.). Lewis 

Joseph. S. of Joseph " 

Lydia Sophia. Philimon " 

Samuel M. & Elisabeth. 

Harlot Eaton ; A bigail F. Hopping ; Betsy Putnam ; 

Elisabeth Ann Gardner. 

Sylvanus Bedlow. S. of "Wid. Lucy. 

of Capt W?' & Pamelia W. 

Arthur. S. of Gilbert & Wife (her a/ct.). 

Mary Copps ; Susan Thompson ; 

Maru Ann; Eliza; Harriet Newell; Charlotte) t^ . 

> ill wing. 
Amelia, eh. of Noble & Miriam (on her a/ct.). > 

Emeline. D. of Oliver & Mary. Brown. 

Caroline. Amos, Jr., & Wife (her a/ct.) Tufts. 

Saml Frothinghatn. Sam' F. " Tufts. 

8. Abigail Maria. D. of E. & Wife (on her a/ct.). Ford. [198] 



Turner. 

Thayer. 

Pool. 

Belcher. 



Gerrish. 

Chandler. 

Simonds. 



Richards. 

Henry. 

Tufts. 



l! 



John Henry. S. of & Sarah W, 

Eliza Greenleaf. Wife of Richard. 
Hannah L. Pratt. 



July 12. 

Aug. 9. 
16. 



Richard Oliver. 
Catharine Rebecca. 
Warren Edwards. 
Thomas Miller. 
Joseph Bennett. 
Sarah Pay son. 
John Chickering. 
William Franklin. 
Emeline Colby. 



S. of Richard & Wife. 
S. of John " 

S. of Amos S. " 
S. of Reuben " 

S. of Joseph " 

D. of Jonathan 2'^ " 
S. of Peter " 

S. of Solomon " 
D. of " 



Studley. 

Greenleaf. 

Pratt. 

Greenleaf. 

Smith. 

Wilkins, 

Page. 

Damon. 

Call. 

Sawyer. 



Oct. 18. 
Dec. 20. 
1830. Apr, 



11. 
May 16. 
June 27. 
July 11. 



Francis Timothy Eaton. S. of Timothy " 



Caldwell. 

Bryant. 

Brown. 

Tufts. 

Tufts. 

Oakman. 

Bearse. 



Jedidiah Morse. S. of Benjamin " 
William Clarke. S. of "William & Eliza. 
4. Alfred. Joseph F. & Wife. 

Catharine. Sam' & Catharine. 

George. Ebenezer & Anna. 

Abraham Fifeld ; Sarah L. Jewett. 

Hannah Julia. D. of Wm C. & Wife (her a/ct.). Christie. 
William Abraham. S. of Eleazer " Fifield. 

John Smith; Benjamin Mirick ; Daniel Hannon; 
Elisabeth Page ; Elizabeth J. Porter ; Mary Byington. 



BAPTISMS, 1831. 



239 



Date. 
[199j 18. 

Aug. 8. 

29. 

Sept. 5. 

12. 



Oct. 


3, 


Nov. 


11. 


Dec. 


12. 


1831. 




Jan. 


9 


Mch. 


20. 


Apr. 


10. 


June 


12. 


Aug. 


14. 


[200] 





21. 



Aug. 28. 
Oct. 2. 
Nov. 6. 
13. 
1832. 
Jan. 19. 

Feb. 26. 
June 10. 
July 22. 
Aug. 12. 



Sep. 
Oct. 



9. 
14. 



Doane. 
Lamson. 

Green. 



Child. Father. Mother. Family Name. 

Henry. S. of Johu & Eleanor (her act.). Hill. 

John Endicot. S. of Joseph N. & Wife. Smith. 

Harriet Louisa. Jechonias & Wife. Thayer. 

Caroline Matilda, > ^^^^^^^^^ ^f g^^y.^ & Wife. Sawyer. 
Ann Elizabeth. ) 

Howard While. S. of Saml & Wife. Oakman. 

Maria Allin; Elizabeth Byrom ; Harriet M. Dwight; 

Elizabeth L. Cronelt [?] ; Mary Trufant, Rebecca 

E.Lowell; Sarah F. Brown ; Elisabeth Tuttle. 
Mercy. D. of Heman S. & Wife. 
Mary Susanna. Nath'. " 

Martha Tufts; Abby Tufts; Eliza Sandin. 
Hannah Green. Wife of William. 
Allin (?) Lambert, Mary Elizabeth; Benjamin 
Francis; Emeline Augusta; children of Benj. & 

Mary his Wife (on her a/ct ). 
Sarah Elisabeth ; Richard Devens ; Thomas Miller; > 

children of Turner & Wife (her a/ct.). ) 

Elizabeth , ) Daughters of Ephraim & Sarah 7 

Harriet Newell. ) Brown. On her acc't. ) 

Warren Fay. S. of John & Wife. 
Sarah Poole. D. of David " 
Mariah Geddis. D. of Maria Allen. 
Charles Otis. S. of Sam' F. & Wife (her a/ct.). 
Mary; Nancy; Thomas; Sarah Elizabeth ; Susan; 

ch. of Thos. & Elizabeth (her a/ct.). 
Caroline Bradlee. D. of Solomon & Wife. 
Joseph Franklin, } children of Joseph & Harriet, 7 
Sarah Jane. S on her acc't. y 

Frances Merinda. D. of Stephen & Wife. 
S. of John " 

Heman S. " 



Warren Evarts. 
Charles Henry. 
Rhoda Lawrence. 
John Aldeuj 
Thomas Henry, 



Trufant. 
Turner. 

Brown. 

Smith. 
Hoyt. 
Allen. 
Tufts. 

By ran. 
Rugg. 

Dwight. 

Sawyer. 
Gammell. 
Doane. 
Lawrence. 



•\ children of Levi & Wife. 

>■ on her acc't, and at her 
Margaret Elizabeth. ) house. 
John Francis. S. of John & Wife. Doane. 

Elizabeth Jane. D. of Thomas S. " Mellen. 

Persis Maria. D. of Jechonias " Thayer. 

Sarah Barry. Wife of Jotham. Barry. 

Edward Tilden. Tilden. 

Joseph Alson. S. of & Sarah W. Studley. 

Sarah Mary Boylston. D. of W™ C. & Wife. Cristy. 

Caroline Maria, \ 

Lucy Sophia, > children of Ezra S. & Caroline. Brewster. 
Eliza Haywood. J 



240 RECORDS OF THE FIRST CHURCH. 

Oliver. S. of Oliver & Eliza N. Dickson. 

Oct. 28. James Frothinrjham. S. of James & Susan 

Hunnewell. Hunnewell. 

Nov. 11. Mary Jane. D. of Joseph & Wife. Underwood. 

[Here ends the Recohd of Baptisms fok the first two Cen- 
turies OF THE First Church in Charlestow^n.] 

MARRIAGES SINCE MAY, 1789. 

1789. [270] 
Aug. 12. George Burrough, of Newbury Port, to Mary Fosdick, of C. 
Dec. 24. Ezra Welch, of Boston, to Rachel Mallett, of C. 

1790. Jan. 3. Samuel Mansir to Hepzibah Goodwin, both of C. 

23. Nath\ Rand, of Ilaverill, to Elisabeth Powars, of C. 
Alch. 3. Naphthali Newhall to Sarah Hooper, both of C. 

7. Samuel Phipps to Esther Rand, both of C. 
May 2. Cotton Center to Peggy Taylor, both of C. 
July 11. Battry Powars to Abigail Rand, both of C. 
Nov. 16. David Carriell to Martha Leathers, both of C. 

24. Nathaniel Fowle to Love Foivle, both of C. 

1791. Apr. 28. Lot Merriam to Abigail Goodwin, both of C. 

David Goodwin to Polly Reed, both of C. 
May 12. Oliver Holden to Nancy Rand, both of C. [271] 

19. Joseph Mirick to Esther Goodwin, both of C. 
Aug. 28. James Turner to Nancy Gould, both of C. 

30. Thomas Safford, of Concord, to Elisabeth Fosdick, of C. 
Oct. 4. Asa Burdit to Hannah Frothingham, both of C. 
Dec. 13. Joseph Lamson to Susannah Frothingham, both of C. 

15. David Bay ley, of Boston, to Phoebe Hatch, of C. Jfl| 

20. Warham Parks, of Westfield, to Rebecca Gorhum, of C. "■ 

1792. Jan. 10. Obadiah White to Elisabeth Hopping, both of C. 

Mch. 9. William Allen, of Boston, to Martha Rand, of C. l 

May 8. Atnariah Childs to Ruthy Larkin, both of C. [272] ' 

June 14. Thomas Christy to Sarah Draper, both (?) of Boston. 

17. Thomas Hooper to Rhoda Richardson, both of C. 

July 8. Aaron Wedgwood to Esther Burdit, both of C. 

Aug. 17. James Murry, of C, to Rebecca Carr, of Boston. 

Sep. 12. John Goodwin to Polly Wellington, both of C. 

Nov. 8. William Leathers to Phoebe Richardson, both of C. 

20. Deacon Thoinas Tho7npson, of Newbury Port, to Sarah Wood, of C 

26. Peter Chardon Brooks, of Boston, to Anne Gorham, of C. 

Dec. 9. Thomas Foster to Catharine Bartlett, botli of C. 

1793. Jan. 24. George Runey to Hannah Turner, both of C. 

^r^'" In printing, the word Cliarlcstown in the Records is abbreviated C, and 
the family names repeated there at the ends of the lines are omitted here. 



MARRIAGES, 1793-96. 241 

John Alwater, of Westfield, to Martha Call, of C. 

Phillips Payson, of Boston, to Ruth Larkin, of C. 

Gershom Williams, of Medford, to Lucy Ingols, of C. [273] 

John Carter to Abigail Floyd, both of C. 

John Hutchinson, to Mary Fox, both of C. 

David Edmunds to Marcy Burditt, both of C. 

James Edmunds to Martha Waters, both of C. 

Joshua Hooper to Hannah Barrington, both of C. 

Tabor Hollis to Sarah Tripe, both of C. 

Edward Cary, Jr., of Nantucket, to Abigail Rufsel, of C. 

John Lamson, of Exeter, to Sally Townsend, of C. 

Benjamin Leathers to Elizabeth Cook, both of C. 

John Stanton, of Boston, to Mary Edes, of C. 

Samuel (?) Mansir, of C, to Nancy Brown, of Boston. 
. 9. Thomas Rand to Mary Larkin, both of C. [-74] 

Thomas Brazier to Elisabeth Reed, both of C. 

TFm. Rand to Eunice Hooper, both of C. 

Nathaniel Qorham, Jr., to /im/^ Wood, both of C. 

Caleb Lamson to Joanna Rand, both of C. 

Ephrahn Frost, Jr., of Cambridge, to Martha Boylston, of C. 

Nahum Fay, of Boston, to 5a% Putnam, of C. 

George Bartlett to Mary Gorham, both of C. 

Jacob Thompson, of Hamilton, to Nancy Bobbins, of C. 

George Jackins to Pa«y Mosely, both of Boston. Married by 
NatW Gorham, Esq. 

William Miller to Mary Goodwin, both of C. 
. 1. James Mansir to Mary Blood, both of C. 

Samuel Hutchinson, of Cavendish (Vir.), to Martha Davis, of C. 

/saac Bullard, of Providence, to Rachel Pratt, of C. 

William Spofford to Jia?-?/ Sloane, both of C. [275] 

Andreio Rowlstone, of Boston, to Elisabeth Turner, of C. 

David Barker to Rebecca Setvell Burdit, both of C. 

Hutchinson Tufts, Jr., of Medford, to Mary Locke, of C. 
June 14. JoAn Turner to Joanna Runey, both of C. 

ii/ias Farnsworth to Mary Cary, both of C. 

/acoft Farnsworth to Marcy Hay, both of C. 

Satnuel Haynes, Jr., of East Sudbury, to Rebecca Bunker, of C. 

Jonathan Hunt, of Boston, to Hannah Larkin, of C. 

10. /saoc Williams to Susanna Hooper, both of C. 

Micah Lawrence, of Ashby, to Hannah Bunker, of C. 

JbAn Armstead to Nancy Larkin, both of C. Married by Dr. 
Bartlett. 

Henry Putnam, of Reading, to Zwct/ Tiz/Zs, of C. 

/ames Tranavre to Elisabeth Swift, both of C. [276] 

Daniel Holden, of C, to Hannah Green, of Pepperill. 

/srtoc Weatherby, to Hannah Cutter, both of C. 
16 





30. 


Apr. 


2. 




22. 




25. 


June 


12. 




27. 


July 


14. 




21. 


Sep. 


24. 


Oct. 


6. 




29. 


Nov. 


19. 


Dec. 


2. 


1794. 


Jan, 




10. 


Feb. 


11. 




27. 


June 


3. 




17. 


Oct. 


12. 


Nov. 


2. 




18. 


Dec. 


16. 


1795. 


Jan. 




6. 




8. 




18. 


Feb. 


1. 


May 


21. 





21. 




28. 


July 


26. 


1796. 


Jan. 




11. 


Feb. 


18. 


Mar. 


6. 




10. 




30. 



242 RECORDS OF THE FIRST CHURCH. 



1 
I 



Apr. 3. Joseph Stevens, of C, to Xancij Whipple, of Boston. 

24. Daniel Carter to Hannah Colder, both of C. 
June 5. Silas Niles to Peggy Heed, both of C. 
July 31. Rowland Center to Hannah Taylor, both of C. 
Aug. 17. Elias Doopy to Abigail Polly, both of C. 

John Hunt, of C, to JS/t2° Boioles, of Boston. 
Sep. 6. Thomas Hills, of Savannah, Georgia, to Hannah Tufts, of C. 

15. Joh7i Carter, Jr., of C, to Esther Beacham, of Maiden. 
Oct. 2. James Stitts to Polly Cooke, both of C. 

13. D" Thomas Millar to Elisabeth Devens, both of C. Married by 
Dr. Bartlett. 

Jo/<n West, of Boston, to Rachel Cole, of C. 

Thomas Wellman, to Hannah Bowles, both of C. [277] 

David Lloyd to Rebecca Roberts, both of C. 

Timothy Thompson, Jr., to Sarah C alder, both of C. 

IFarri C/arA; Dean, of Exeter, New Hamp. to Margaret Wood, of C. 

Daniel Leman to Margaret Shepherd, both of C. 
, 7. Timothy Tufts to Samittee (?) FZa/y^f, both of C. 

/saac 5»hVA to Sarah Raymond, both of C. 

Samuel Soley to Elisabeth Lai-kin, both of C. 

TF»i. Lewis to Mary Sloane, both of C. 

JoA?j Edmunds, Jr., to i/ar^ Murray, both of C. 

David Leveston to Lydia Fefsenden, both of C. 

Elisha Norcro/s to /'o//_(/ Holman, both of C. 

SiVas Pilsbury, of Newbury, to yl/;i>ai7 Cu»er, of C. [278] 

jRey. Nathan Bradstreet, of Chester, N. H., to Phoebe Dexter, of C. 

Samuel Adams, of Concord, N. H., to Margaret Austin, of C. 

Jo/<7i Nutting to Po^/;?/ iJi/'c/, both of C. 

Samuel Swan to .4»i/ia Whittemore, both of C. 

/o^« Langdon Sullivan, of Boston, to Elisabeth Rufsell, of C. 

JoA/i Vintin, of C, to Rebecca Cartrite, of Boston. 

Ephraim Mann, of Dorchester, to Rebecca Lindsey, of C. 

Daniel Emerson to Esther Frothingham, both of C. j|| 

Benjamin Joy, of Boston, to Hannah Barrell, of C. 

Samuel Crafts, of Cambridge, to Rebecca Choate, of C. 

Josiah Harris to Maria Burdetl, both of C. 
, 7. Joseph Parker, of Reading, to Peggy Ganvin, of C. [279] 

William Lewis to Betsey Fuller, both of C, negroes. 

Thomas Andloe, of Boston, to Dorcas Blanchard, of C. 

William Taylor to Hannah Manning, both of C. 

Reuben Dodge, of C, to il/a/-^ O^u-er, of Boston. 

James Otis to 5rt//?/ LeFabure, both of C 

William Manning, of C, to //e/^// M^Intire, of Boston. 

Jo/i?i P. Duncklee to 3/ar?/ Harrington, both of C. 

Franclf Sweetser, of C, to 3/ary TVAee/er, of Concord. 

£6er Lawrence to /-wc^ Burton, both of C 





23. 


Nov. 


15. 




21. 




27. 


Dec. 


3. 




11. 


1797. 


Jan. 




22. 




24. 


Feb. 


26. 


Mar. 


16. 


Apr. 


30. 


May 


7. 




27. 


Aug. 


10. 


Sep. 


26. 




28. 


Oct. 


12. 




28. 




30. 


Dec. 


3. 




14. 




24. 


1798. 


Jan 




14. 


Feb. 


8. 




28. 


Mch. 


18. 


Apr. 


29. 


July 


8. 




14. 


Oct. 


16. 




29. 



Nov. 


1. 




8. 


Dec. 


6. 




9. 




23. 


1799. 


Jan. 


Apr. 


9. 




28. 





30. 


June 
Sep. 


6. 
2. 

8. 


Oct. 


8. 
13. 


Dec. 


4. 




17. 




29. 



MARRIAGES, 1798-1801. 243 

John Rohbins to Sally Munday, both of C. 
Timothy Keith to Lydia Wyer, both of C. 
Johii Dickson to Phebe Childs, both of C. 
Francis Hyde to Mehitable Raymond, both of C. 
John Phillips to Lydia Gorham, both of C. 
10. William Frost, of Cambridge, to Lucy Adams, of C. 
David Vose to Sally Goodwin, both of C. 
Bartholomew Raymond to Sally Cloutman, both of C. 
William Green to Sally Harris, both of C. 
30. Simon Grover to Celina Gardner, both of C. 
May 6. Seth Sweetfer to Sarah Frothingham, both of C. 
Stephen Twycrofs to Lydia Johnson, both of C. 
William Maxwell to Elisabeth Newhall, both of C. 
John Burditt to Anne Kelly, both of C. 

Joseph Reed to Elisabeth Keyes, both of C. [281] 

Charles Haley to Mary Cutler, both of C. 
Otis Clap to Elisabeth Hills, both of C. 
Israel Jenkins to Abigail Penny, both of C. 
Richard Skimmer to Rebecca Cook, both of C. 
Benjamin Burt Swan to Abigail Ridgeioay, both of C. 
Samuel Burdett to Rebecca Cary, both of C. 
John Fillebrown to Nancy Rand, both of C. 

1800. Mch. 13. Arnold Merryfield to Mary Parker, both of C. 

23. Benjamin Turner to Polly Sweetser, both of C. 
May 8. Edward Goodwin to Catharine Larkin, both of C. 

15. John Brinckley to Bethiah Phipps, both of C. 

24. CaZeft Sweetser to Hannah Burdit, both of C. 

June 12. Thomas Rand to Mar?/ Hammett, both of C. [282] 

14. Samuel Cartwright to Scr//^ Ga^e, both of C 

Sep. 25. Pe<er 5urr, of Boston, to Nancy Goodwin, of C. 

Oct. 2. Kendall Bayley to Ann Hay, hoth oi C. 

Nov. 19. Benjamin Brown to Nancy Wyer, both of C. 

Dec. 11. Israel Amesbury to Rachel Newhall, both of C. 

1801. Jan. 15. Abner Hersey, of Hingham, to SaZZ^ Sioeetfer, of C. 
Mar. 29. Robert Clark to Fanny Richardson, both of C. 

Apr. 2. Samuel Jaques to Harriet Whittemore, both of C. 

5. Thomas Edmands to Elisabeth Allen Rand, do. 

9. Edward Walker to Persis Phipps, do. 

May 3. Michael Brigden, of C, to Rebecca Gill, of Boston. 
TFj7//a»i Hammett, of Boston, to Fanny Rand, of C. 

10. Thomas Pike, of Boston, to Desire Holman. 

June 14. Ebenezer Thompson to Hannah Gage, both of C. [283] 

July 12. .4mos Carleton to Nancy Bailey, both of C. 

19. Hubbard Carr to Lydia Leveston, both of C. 

21. Luther White to Mary Leman, both of C. 

22. William Ferry, of Boston, to Rachel Draper Waters, of C. 



244 RECORDS OF THE FIRST CHURCH. 

Gershom Teel to Martha Mirick, both of C. 
Micak Stone, of Brookfield, to Sarah \Vood, of C. 
Jacob Brown to Joanna Houghton, both of C. 
lliomas Oliver Larkin to Anne Cooper, both of C. 
John Chipman Blackler, of Marblehead, to Lucy Harris, of C. 
10. Samuel Ba/sctt, of Boston, to Elhaheth Scott, of C. 
Joseph Acuter to Hannah Johnson, both of C, negroes. 
Ebenezer Larkin to Manj Howe, both of C. 

Joseph Adams to Sarah Tufts, both of C. [284] 

Benjamin Hill to Mary Cornel, both of Boston. 
John Cutter to Elisabeth Smith, both of C. 
Samuel Larkin, Jr., to Sarah Adams, both of C. 
Joshua Hohlen to Mary A. Mitchell, both of C. 
Benjamin Barrell to Hannah Rogers, both of C. 
Thomas Hooper, 2'', to Alary Wyer, both of C. 
Shadrach Shattuck to Sarah Locke, both of C. 
Francis Bennett to Alary Reed, both of C. 
2'homas Hills to Susanna Coggeshall, do. 
Josepth Hull, of Boston, to ^4«;i Roberts, of C. 
2. Gideon Snow, of Boston, to Ruthy Wilhelmina Barrell, of C. 
Joseph Bellows, of Walpole, N. H., to Alary Adams, of C. 
Livius Curtis to Susanna Wallis Frothingham, both of C. 
Charles Bradbury to Hannah Oaks, do. 

./oAn KiUon to Abigail Tag, do. [285] 

Samuel Allen to Abigail Hill, do. 
Gershom Bates to Hannah Buckman, do. 
Samuel Stoddard to Alary Davidson, do. 

George Washington Vinal, of C, to Nancy Deadman, of Reading. 
Christopher Jourdan to Alary Graham, both of C. 
Thomas Deans, of Boston, to Betsey Tay, of C. 
William Belcher to Hannah Rand, both of C. 
Samuel Goodwin Twycro/s to Alartha Austin, both of C. 
Archelaus Flint to il/«ry F/jn/, both of C. 
Robert Ernes to Alartha Hall, both of C. 
Thomas Brown to ^?jne Keyes, both of C 
JoAn Skinner to Hannah Hurd, both of C. 

Nathaniel Alley, Jr., Boston, to ^?oja Edmunds, of C. [286] 
i)iya/j Bowen to Elizabeth Flint, both of C. 
Jonathan Blasdell to Isabella Alallett, do. 
George Conn, of C, to J/ary Gould, of Boston. 
JJ/tas Farnsworth to 5a% Dixon, both of C. 
Rufus Piper to Dorcas Fillebrown, do. 
William Fuller to Alary Fosdick, do. 

, 8. Thomas Bellows, of Walpole, N. H., to Eleanor Foster, of C 
TFi7/jam iVt/e.s' to Alary Thorp, both of C. 
Stephen Barker to Susannah Hovcy, do. 



Aug. 


30. 


Sep. 
Oct. 


1. 
14. 


Nov. 


29. 


Dec. 


20. 


1802. 


Jan. 




17. 




30. 


Feb. 


25. 


Mar. 


28. 


Apr. 


8. 
21. 




27. 


June 


10. 


July 


11. 
25. 


Aug. 


1. 
26. 


Sep. 
1803. 


26. 
Jan. 




9. 




17. 


Mar. 


24. 




27. 


Apr. 
July 


17. 
24. 
31. 


Aug. 


11. 


Sep. 


11. 
12. 




29. 




30. 


Oct. 


3. 




15. 




16. 




20. 




22. 




30. 


Nov. 


3. 




22. 




27. 


Dec. 


1. 


1804 


Jan 




11. 




15. 



Jan. 


22. 


Feb. 


12. 


Mar. 


13. 




22. 




29. 


Apr. 


1. 

26. 


May 


2. 

20. 




22. 


June 


17. 


June 


12. 


Sep. 
Oct. 


30. 
7. 




28. 




29. 


Nov. 


1. 


Dec. 


13. 




30. 


Nov. 


28. 


1805. 


Jan. 




19. 


Feb. 


3. 




17. 


Mar, 


11. 




24. 


Apr. 
May 


18. 
12. 

20. 




23. 


June 


2. 




4. 




6. 




15. 



MARRIAGES, 1804-1805. 245 

Rufus Lucas to Olive Caldwell, both of C. 

William Barrett, of Maiden, to Mari/ Hall, of C. 

Marshall Stoddard to Anna Kendall, both of C. 

John S. Capt to Eliza M. Langdon, both of Boston. [287] 

John Do(j(jett, Roxbury, to Sophia Miller, of C. 

David Poor to Mary Carleton, both of C. 

Lemuel Thaijer to Abigail Prescot Chikh, both of Boston. 

Giles Starr, Middletown, to Deborah Hill, of C. 

Abraham Saunderson to Hepzibah Mallett, both of C. 

Richard Sullivan, of Boston, to Sarah Ru/sell, of C. 

David Devens to Abigail Adams, both of C. 

Hon. John Treadwell, Salem, to Hannah Austin, of C. 

Isaac Butler to Nancy Chaplin, both of C. 

Benjamin Gage to Anne Hay, do. 

Ebenezer Jones to Abigail Calder, do. 

Solomon Spaidding to Polly Pater son, do. 

Joseph Gushing, Amherst, to Rebecca Edmands, of C. 

Nathan Bridge to Elisabeth Bartletl, both of C. [288] 

Jonas Tyler to Rebecca Adams, do. 

John Soley to Rebecca Tyng Henley, do. 

3. Moody Whiting to Polly Saicyer, do. 

Joseph Parker to Mar?/ Rand, do. 

Ca/e& Pierce to Mary Mirick, do. 

Samuel Cutter, of C, to Eunice Carter, of Peterborough. 

/saac Mead, of C, to ^d/ice Carter, of Boston. 

Oliver Keating to 5a% Lyman, both of C. 

/srtao TFai7 to Rebecca Cutter, do. 

George Skimmer to i^a//// Fowle, do. 

Simeon Snow, Jr., to Susanna Niles, do. 

Robert Lovering to Elisabeth Simonds, do. 

Ebenezer Robbins to Elisabeth Robbins, do. 

/oAn Williams, Marblehead, to Nancy Dowse, of C. 

Matthew Bird, of C, to Mary Baldwin, of Billerica. 

Jacob Saunderson, of C, to Ztic?/ P<//s, of Roxbury. [289] 

Jo/tn Edmands, of C, to Mary Cunningham, of Boston. 

Melvin Stoio to ^?ine Mayhew, both of C. 

Ca/e6 Hovey to -dn/je Kempt, both of C. 
30. Aaron Shattuck to Hannah Beard, do. 

/saac Kendall, of C, to iwc?/ Sabells, of Boston. 
21. Zeui Adams to Abigail Bemis, both of C. 
15. Ebenezer Baker, of Boston, to ^Zjce Bridge, of C. 

James Rebaro to Elisabeth Slat, both of C, Mulattoes. 
17. Robert Potter, of C, to Ja?!e Perkins, of Cambridge. 
27. Williatn Wait Oliver, Salem, to 50% Gardner, of C. 
3. Abraham Carleton, Boston, to Mercy Pollard, of C. 

David Bolles to Zt/c// Stone, both of C. 



246 RECORDS OF THE FIRST CHURCH. 

Benjamin Jenkins, Andover, to SaraJi Thompson, of C. 

Daniel Farley to Ruth Female! , both of C. [290] 

Lewis Stearns, Boston, to Rebecca Gage, of C. 

Benjamin Gleason to Rebecca W. Maxwell, both of C. 

Henry Vanvoras to Betsey Mead, both of C. 

Henry V. Hammatt, Boston, to Abigail Manning, of C. 

William Washburn to Rachel Barrett, both of C. 

5. Solomon Hovey to Sally Johnson, both of C. 

Thomas Gould to Lydia Ellingwood, do. 

Lewis Sergeant to Rebecca Calder, do. 

Caleb Thayer to Deborah Waif, do. 

Je/se Davidson to Rebecca Oaks, do. 

Melzer Torrey to Ma7-y Pi-entice Tufts, do. 

Zadock Patch, of C, to Lydia Reed, of Boston. 

James Curtis to Prudence Bird, both of C. 

John Baker, Roxbury, to Lydia Teel, of C. [291] 

Isaac Call Frothingham to Joanna Sampson, both of C. 

Abel Chandler to Mary Burrill, both of C. 

Jonas Richardson to Sally Sawyer, do. 

Tri7/ia?ft Fernald to Sa//^ Carleton, do. 

George Kew to Rebecca Abbot, both of C. ^ 

/o^»i Gregory to Sarah Call, both of C. 

Christopher Atioell Olney, Providence, to P/i«'&e Trumbull, of C. 

David Woodward to Cynthia Stoddard, both of C. 

Ca/eft Brooks, of C, to Hannah Tidd, of Medford. 

Absalom Rand to A/ary TFujs/njo, both of C. 

/oAn Tufts, Jr., of C, to Abigail Wheeler, of Shrewsbury. 

iToAn Coombs to Margaret Davidson, both of C. 

^rfe/ Spaulding to So//?/ 3FIntire, do. 

Robert Fletcher to Catherine Turrell, do. 

James Niles to Rachel Vinal, do. 

JoAti Pelham to Sa//^/ Pierce Daniels, do. [292] 

James K. Frothingham to Ruthy Frothingham, do. 

Edward Dammon to Ruthy Gibbs, do. 

/o/m Coffran to Susanna Newhall, do. 

/o7<n Mitchell to Sa//y Phipps, do. 

/o^7i Holton, of C, to Thankfull Allen, of Boston. 

Joseph Ells, of C, to Elisabeth Vinal Leicis, of Boston. 

Daniel Pratt, Jr., Chelsea, to il/ar?/ f/^a//, of C. 

James Nichols to Rebecca Barton, both of C. 

Ephraim Bryant to Martha Bennet, do. 

1. Henry Adams to Susan Foster, both of C. 

Isaac Lilly, Drefden, to Elisabeth Johnson, of C. 
18. Pe<er Gilmnn Bobbins, Lynn, to Abigail Dowse, of C. 

Laban Turner to Rebecca Burditt, both of C. 
25. Leonard Bemis, Boston, to Jl/a?-^ Smith, of C. 



Nov. 


19. 




21. 




28. 


Dec. 


8. 




29. 




31. 


1806. 


Jan. 




16. 




28. 


Mar. 


9. 




27. 




30. 


Apr. 


1. 


May 


18. 




25. 


June 


4. 




22. 




29. 


July 


6. 




27. 


Aug. 


25. 




28. 


Sep. 


22. 




28. 


Oct. 


1. 




16. 




27. 


Nov. 


23. 




25. 




27. 


Dec. 


3. 




4. 




14. 




23. 




25. 


Nov. 


18. 


1807 


Jan 





23. 


Mar. 


1. 




3. 




5. 




19. 


Apr. 
June 


5. 

7. 


July 


2. 
26. 


Aug. 


9. 


Sep. 
Oct. 


20. 
11. 




13. 


Nov. 


15. 




22. 


Dec. 


3. 




6. 




10. 




31. 


1808. 


Jan, 




17. 


Mar. 


17. 




21. 


Apr. 
May 
June 


7. 
12. 
12. 


July 


3. 
24. 


Aug. 
Oct. 


28. 
2. 




13. 




27. 




30. 


Nov. 


2. 




6. 


1809. 


Jan. 




19. 


Feb. 


16. 


Mar. 


15. 




26. 


Apr. 
June 


30. 
18. 



MARRIAGES, 1807-1809. 247 

Swethen [?] Reed, Chelsea, to Sukey FUlebrown, of C. 
Lewis Mason, Cambridge, to Lydla M^Intire, of C. [293] 

Thomas Kettell to Mary Soley, both of C. 
Enoch Hunt to Esther Kettell, both of C. 
Moody Whiting to Sally Barrett, both of C. 
John Hay to Sally Sloan, both of C. 
Joshua P. Brown to Sai-ah Keyes, do. 
Edward Cutter to Elisabeth Nutting, do. 
John Boioers to Prudence Richard/on, do. 
John Kidder, Jr., to Mary Brinckley, do. 
James Blake to Elisabeth Clark, both of Boston. 
Henry Tucker to Mary Howard, both of C. 
Elijah Simonds, Charlestown, N. H., to Mitty Tufts, of C. 
William Sawyer to Susan Thompson, both of C. 
Dafiiel Frothingham, of C, to Rebecca Barrett, of Lancaster. 
Samuel Stevens, Jr., Andover, to Susannah Manning, of C. 
Jonathan L. Whiting, Boston, to Ann Barker, of C. 
Josiah Colby, Bowdoinham, to Sally Davidson, of C. [294] 

James Ayers to Sally Mansir, both of C. 
Otis Clap, of C, to Sally Newhall, of Boston. 
Benj. Bowen to Deborah Pettingal, both of C. 
Moses Eastman, Salisbury, N. H., to Eliza Sweetser, of C. 
Jerahmeel Clapp to Mary Bodge, both of C. 
, 7. John Bates Francis to Susanna Lonnon, do., Negroes. 
Timothy Tufts to Sukey Cutter, both of C. 
Simon Cole to Lydia Freeman, do., Negroes. 
Reuben K. Blanchard to Mary G. Edmands, both of C. 
Peter Thatcher, Boston, to Charlotte S. M^Donough, of C. 
Ensign Lincoln, Boston, to Sophia Oliver Larkin, of C. 
Jacob Caswell to Nancy Moulton, both of C. 
Simon Towle, Boston, to Lucy Munday, of C. 
James Kimball to Catharine Muvroe, both of C. [295] 

Abij'ah Blanchard to Hepzibah Goodwin Mansir, do. 
Joseph Norcro/s, Boston, to Mary Mallett, of C. 
Seth Tucker, Concord (N. H.), to Eliza Kent, of C. 
Thomas Boylston to Marcy Farnsworth, of C. 
Thomas B. Rand to Priscilla Penniman, both of C. 
Richard Frothingham, Jr., to Mary Thompson, do. 
Gideon Lambert, Boston, to Nancy Wyer, of C. 
5. Joseph Phipps, Jr., of C, to Mary Bowles, of Medford. 
John Sweetser to Eliza Scott, both of C. 
William Poivars to Lucy Stoddard, do. 
Israel Wait to Martha Trask, do. 
Robert Hosea to TMcy Going, both of Boston. 
Peter Satcyer to Charlotte Chickering, both of C. 
James Bogman to Betsey Nelson, do. [296] 



248 RECORDS OF THE FIRST CHURCH. 

Jund 27. Henry Ladd, Portsmouth (N. H.), to Hannah Hurd, of C. 

28. Elias Phinney, Thomaston, to Catharine Bartlett, of C. 

July 2. Jacob Felt to Betsey Neyles, both of C. 

Aug. 24. Isaac Blanchard to Margarette Wilder, do. 

Oct. 5. Aaron Hadley, of C, to Charlotte Nourse, of Framingham. 

19. Peter Dexter to Sally Dexter, both of C. 

Absent from Xov. 14, 1809, to May 28th, 1810, for the recovery of health 
— in S" CaroUna and Georgia. [Note by Dr. M.] 

1810. June 14. Martin Burchesto Mary Sparhawke, hothoiBostou,noyroiC. fl 
Aug. 7. Joseph Lafleur to Elisabeth Foster, both of C. 

26. Simeon Flint to Lydia Ann Ford, both of C. 

30. Josiah Salisbury, Boston, to Abigail Breese, of C. ^^B 

Sep. 18. William King, Boston, to Eliza Ingcrsol, of C. "^B 

Nov. 15. Ebenezer Whitney to Mahetible W. Nutting, of C. 

27. Reuben W. Gerry, Boston, to Catharine Lombard, of C. ' 
Dec. 5. John Stevens to Lucy Dickson, both of C. 

26. Gilbert Tufts to Mary Chickering, do. [297] 

1811. Jan. 13. Edward Holhrook, Boston, to Hepzibah Goodrich, of C. 
Feb. 5. John Huddy King, Portsmouth (N. H.), to Harriet Dickey Green, 

18. James Bogman to Parlee Nelson, both of C. [of C. 

21. Nathan Tufts, 3'^, to Sally Miller, do. 

26. Jeremy Wilson, of C, to Nancy Porter, of Boston. 

27. Peter Wright to Catharine Skillings, both of C. (Blacks). 
June 18. Abner Rogers to Ruth Hurd, both of C. 

July 15. Samuel Devens to Rachel Carver, do. 

Sep. 22. Gardner H. Rand, Boston, to SaUy Frothingham, of C. 

Oct. 13. John Winship, of C, to Mary Floyd, of Maiden. 

Nov. 3. John Butterfeld, Roxbury, to Mary Miller, of C. 

1812. Feb. 27. haac Corey to Sally Center, both of C. 
May 10. Azariah Fuller, Brookline, to Ruth King, of C. 
June 7. Frederick Peabody to Rebecca Carter, both of C. 

14. Charles Richardson, oiC, to Mary Lock, oiWohurn. [298] 

28. Joseph Wheeler to Catharine Stevens, both of C. 
Sep. 1. Lucas Peterson to Sarah Vend, do. 

Oct. 1. Sam'. T. Armstrong, Boston, to Abigail Walker, of C. 

28. Marvin Marcy, Cambridge, to Christian R. Richards, of C. 

Dec. 3. Nehemiah Wyma7i, of C, to Susan Cutler, of Chelsea. 

1813. Feb. 2. Moses Merrill, Medford, to Sally Parker, of C. 
Mar. 28. Aaron Clapp, Watertown, to Ann Hyde, of C. 
Apr. 29. Marshall Johnson to Hannah Center, both of C. 
June 17. Jonathan Teel to Harriet Scott, both of C. 

27. William Norton, Boston, to Harriet Ammidon, of C. 

July 2. Avery Bent to Elisabeth Hamson, both of C. 

Oct. 9. Oliver Brown to Hannah Spofford, do. 

11. William Munroe to Lucy Frost, do. 

Nov. 21. Josiah Hatch Barker to Mary Shattuck, do. 





i.U. 

26. 


1814. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


20. 


Mar, 


17. 



MARRIAGES, 1814-1817. 249 

[The record is continued on page 210.] 
Dec. G. Benjamin Adams to Susan Wyman, both of C. 

Leavit Corbelt to Lucinda Winn, both of C. 

John Moody Robertson to Betsey Cutting, do. 

John Dudley, Boston, to Esther Eliza Smith, of C. 

Roswell Field, Northfield, to Peace Cook, of C. 

11. Abraham Craidey, Roxbury, to Aletta Chidester, of C. 

Ellas Danforth, Lexington, to Lucy Smith, of C. 

Thomas B. Rand to Lillis Jenkins, both of C. 

Thomas Brooks, Jr., to Eliza Thayer, do. 
May 22. James Caldwell to Lucy Bryant, do. 

Caleb Symmes to Mary Bowers, do. 
Aug. 14. John Carter to Hannah Shipper, do. 

21. Jacob Macknay, of C, to Sally Smith, of Boston, Negroes. 
Sep. 29. Joseph Froihinr/hatn, Salem, to Deborah Tufts, of C. 

1815. Mar. 4. John L. Blake to Lcetitia Vidgiers, both of C. [241] 
May 15. Royal W. Stanley to Eliza Ellis, do. 

June 15. Oliver Clark, Boston, to Abigail F. Edes, of C. 

Aug. 22. James Porter to Mary Edes, both of C. 

Oct. 9. James Burnet to Hannah Newcomb, do. 

15. John Langley to Harriet Flint, do. 

22. Henry Jaques to Sarah Whittemore, do. 
Dec. 3. Joshua B. Phipps to Elisabeth H. Hagar, do. 

1816. Jan. 7. John Thorning to Nancy White, both of C. 

Jedidiah Lakeman, Boston, to Rhoda Remington, of C. [of C. 
Feb. 4. Abel Bowman, Jr., Billerica, to Hannah Frothingham Hunnewell, 
Mar. 31. Lewis Woi-then to Caroline Antonietta Nutting, both of C. 
Apr. 16. Eliphalet Ladd, Boston, to Mary Larkin Hurd, of C. 

William J. Walker to Eliza Hurd, both of C. 
June 16. John Call, 2'^, to Eliza Marple, do. 

July 4. Robert Clark, Ackworth (N. H.), to Sally Wyman, of C. [242] 
Aug. 6. Elijah Vose, Jr., to Rebecca Gorham Bartlett, both of C 

22. Amasa Porter to Abigail Frothingham, both of C. 
Sep. 3. Simeon Flint to Hepzibah Kettell, both of C. 

Miles Jones, Savannah, Georgia, to Susan Barker, of C. 
Oct. 27. Thomas B. Wyinan to Mary Frothingham, both of C. 
Nov. 5. John Winship to Mary Brown, both of C. 

26. Thomas Fuller Bond to Elisabeth Champion, do. 

1817. Jan. 1. William Ble/dell to Sally Rugg, both of C. 
26. William M. Rogers to Lydia Hearsey, do. 

Feb. 10. Jefse L. Hibbs to Hannah Morris, do. 

Mar. 31. William Hawry to Tryphena Tufts, both of Medford. 

Apr. 16. Amory Hartshorn, Walpole, to Emily Parker, of C. 

June 19. Peter Underwood, Amherst, N. H., to Ann Gage, of C. 

22. Isaac Whittemore to Lrjdia Stickney, both of C. [243] 

July 27. Williatn A. Parker to Hannah Hooper, do. 



\ 



250 KECORDS OF THE FIRST CHURCH. 

Aug. 6. Charles F. Waldo to Sarah V. Forster, do. 

Joseph Damon, East Sudbury, to Rebecca Forster, of C. 
Isaac H. Rohbins, Savannah, to Ruby [?] M. Barker, of C. 
Abel Adams, Boston, to Abby Lai-kin, of C. 
Joel Abbott to Hannah Bowman, both of C 
William Oliver, Maiden, to Mary Whitmarsh, of C. 
Christian Schultz to Mary Wood, both of C. 
Williayn Billings, of C, to Sarah Veaton, of Boston. 
Isaac Chittenden to Tamson Welch, both of C. 
Samuel S. Reynolds to Beulah Reed, do. 
Samuel Abbott to Lucretia Fowle, do. 
11. Francis A. Burnham to Mary Barker, do. 
Robert B. Edes to Sarah Barker, do. 

Samuel Fisk, Hudson, to Ardclia Louisa Tufts, of C. [244] 

Peter Durell, of C, to Margaret F. Sutton, of Boston, 
i'l/c/i Cutter, of C, to iwcy Hathorn, of Jeffrey. 
Stukeley B. Fe/senden, Boston, to Sarah Wyer, of C. 
William Morgan, of C, to Bet/ey Collins, of Boston. 
Rufus Brackett to iJ/ar_y Ann Dadly, both of C. 
Joshua B. Phipps, of C, to Susan F. Pitt, of Wiscafsett. 
John J. Stowell to Mary Ann G. Davidson, both of C. 
Charles Durrie, of C, to Priscilla Holden, of Boston. 
John Hamson to Betsey Raymond, both of C. 
, 4. Joseph Lafleur, Boston, to Betsey Bryant, of C. 

22. William Badger to il/ary Brown, both of C. 
26. Nathaniel Childs to Catharine Stimpson, do. 

Jo/jn i^. Fisher to il/ar?/ M'^Millon, do. 
Sep. 5. Henry Pease to /ane Harper, do. [245] 

23. James Hunnewell to (Swsan Lamson, both of C. 
Oct. 5. Willard H. Symms to Sa% Parker, do. 

Dec. 9. Ebenezer Morse to Lydia Young, do. 

1820. [The record by Rev. J. Morse, D.D., ends with the above entry, and 

is continued, without break, by Rev. Warren Fay, D.D.] 

Mar. 9. Abijah Bemis, Weston, to Nancy Turner, of C. 

13. Abel Leighton to Abigail P. Trask, both of C. 
May 7. John Savage to Mary Harris, both of C. 

14. Charles Wiscoat to Catharine Thompson, do. 
Joseph Ingalls, Jr., to Eliza Holman, do. 

18. William C. Cristy to Hannah Taylor, do. 

June 25. Jarvis Lothrop, Easton, to Esther Neiccomb, of C. 

July 6. Samuel Beck to Hannah Satctell, both of C. 

16. Shadrach Leighton, of C, to Charlotte Beard, of Boston. 

23. Charles Bruce to Nancy Creek [?], both of C. 

Aug. 6. Bartlett Oilman to Betsey Galwer, both of C. [246] 

Oct. 15. Richard W. Rowland, St. John's, Newfoundland, to Lucy S. 
Wyman, of C. 





7. 




18. 




31. 


Sep. 


14. 


Nov. 


3. 




4. 




9. 




17. 




23. 


Dec. 


8. 


1818. 


Jan 




18. 




25. 


Mar. 


29. 


Apr. 


5. 




16. 


May 


3. 


June 29. 


July 


16. 




23. 


Sept. 


6. 


Nov. 


15. 


1819. 


Ap] 





20. 


Nov. 


2. 




12. 


Dec. 


10. 




21. 


1821. 


Jan 




30. 




31. 


Feb. 


10. 


May 


2. 




24. 


June 


7. 


Sep. 


4. 




6. 




30. 


Nov. 


25. 


Dec. 


9. 


1822. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


3. 




6. 




20. 




21. 


Mch. 


17. 


Apr. 


18. 


July 


10. 


Aug. 


4. 




27. 


Sep. 


2. 


Oct. 


22. 




23. 


Nov. 


26. 


Dec. 


3. 




25. 


1823. 


Jan 




7. 


Feb. 


18. 


Apr. 


16. 




24. 


May 


22. 




29. 


July 


2. 




20. 



MARRIAGES, 1821-1823. 251 

Nathaniel I. Varnujii to Emma Perry, both of C. 
Thomas Sampson to Hannah Bradford, do. 
Thomas Manly, Boston, to Abigail Chessman, of C. 
Joel Hatch, Jr., Marshfield, to Mai-y Daois, of C. 
David Sewal Pearson, Andover, to Sarah Wild, of C. 
10. Edmund Baylies, Boston, to Eliza Ann Payson, of C. 
Cyrus Clark, of C, to Tahitha Oakes, of Maldeu. 
Jonathan Frost, 2d, West Cambridge, to Evilina Hull, of C. 
Timothy Austin to Parmilia Ball, both of C. 
Timothy Bryant, Jr., to Sophia Eaton, both of C. 
Mr. Benjamin Trufant to Mary Folwer [?] do. 
Joseph Walker, to Anna Pidder, do. [247] 

Davis Kelly, Dartmouth, to Caroline Matilda Chessman, of C. 
James Smith to Elianor Jackson, both of C People of color. 
David A. Sanborn to Hannah A. Stone, both of C. 
Elijah Fuller, of C, to Eunice V. Collins, of Boston. 
Henry Tyler, Boston, to Susan Reynolds, C, Coloured people. 
17. Benjamin Russell, Salgm, to Harriot Giles, of C. 
John Corey to Mary Cogsioell, both of C. 
Rev. Joseph Bennett, Woburn, to Alary Lamson, of C. 
Eliab P. Mackintire to Mai-y Tufts, both of C. 
Luther Cushing to Eliza Wyman, do. 
John R. Kidder to Sarah Delano, do. 
Samuel Dagget to Lucy Kendall, do. 
Otis White to Nancy Delano, do. 

Jesse Twist to Mary Beaverstock, do. [248] 

James Eustis to Susan J. Newell, do. 
Amos Tufts, Jr., to Abigail W. [?] Tapley, do. 
Valentine Baxter, Jr., to Sally Wyman, do. 
Joseph Mirick, Lynn, to Nancy C. Burhank, of C. 
Charles Fox, Dracut, to Sarah Stearns, of C. 
Jacob Sanderson, Jr., to Ruth Fox, both of C. 
Joh7i Allen, Sedgwick, Maine, to Maria Geddes, of C. 
Henry Cobb, Lynn, to Augusta Adams, of C. 
5. Colburn Barrill to Susan Taylor, both of C. 
Matthew Pear to Rebecca Kimball, do. 
Joshua Janes, Boston, to Elisabeth Stearns, of C. 
Henry D. Clare, to Isabella Affleck, both of C. ' [249] 

Charles Lapham to Harriot Jarvis, do. 

James B. Bossuei, Boston, to Eliza Ann Pratt Thompson, of C. 
Joseph Miller, Jr., to Lucy Hadley, both of C. 
James Tolman to Mary Shepard, do. 
Andrew Hutchins to Charlotte Tibbets, do. 
Caleb Dreio to Harriot Pierce, both of C. 
Nicholas Howe, Jr., to Wealthy Petlingill, do. 
24. Samuel Mulliken, M.D. , Dorchester, to MaryLarkin Payson, of C. 



252 RECORDS OF THE FIRST CHURCH. 

Thomas Litch to Lilly Frothingham, both of C. 

John Richmond to Eliza Parker^ Cambridge. But the latter a 
member of my Parish. 

James Wyman, Boston, to Margaret Center, of C. 

Stephen Fuller to Dorcas Howe, both of C. 
. 15. Jonathan Barker to Caroline M. Corson, of C. [250] 

Benjamin Angier to Mary Miller, both of C. 

William N. Porter to Elisabeth M. Porter, do. 

Lawrence Richards to Leonora Bailey, do. 

Thomas Eaton, Jr., Reading, to Nancy Barker, of C. 

Aaron Keheio, Salem, to Ann Cutter, of C. 

Carlton Hadley, Boston, to Mary Barnes, of C. [ioners. 

William M. Pray to Eliza R. RisbrougJi, of Boston. My parish- 

Phillip Kendall to Polly Thompson, both of C. 

Benjamin Brown to Llannah Mead, do. 

Benjamin Litchjield, Boston, to Mary Ann Barker, of C. 

Elijah Hadley to Hannah L. Flanders, both of C. 

Zephaniah Osgood to Miss Sybil Rugg, do. 
. 2. Henry Oliver to Sarah B. Hdl, do. 

Capt. William M'^Alvin to Lucy Johnson, both of C. [251] 

John R. Proctor to Mary Tewksbury, do. 

Ebenezer R. Morse to Rhoda Tomlinson, do. 

Otis Clap to Eliza Larkin, do. 

Henry Lawrence, of C, to Rhoda Cheney, of Boston. 

Gartafiyi R. Lundberg to Mary Mussenden, both of C. 

John Ireland to Nancy Sargent, do. 

Jacob ]\Tain to Mary Cutter, do. 

Daniel B. Widdijield, Boston, to Harriet Hansel, of C. By a 
certificate from Boston. 

Silas Farrar, Cambridge, to Anna A. Gage, of C. 

Christopher Jordan to Sarah S. Porter, both of C. 

Nathaniel Lamson to JSIary Chaplin, both of C. 
L826. Mch. 13. Nathan Blodget to Elizabetji Underwood, do. 
30. Guy C. Hawkins to Eliza Miller, do. 

Ezra Derby to Sully Blaisdill, do. 

Joshua S. Clark to il/ary Reed, do. [252] 

Richard Blanchard to Paulina Tufts, do. 

^aron jB/aA:e to Hannah C. Goodhue, do. 

£^/t Hutchins to Mary Wailt, do. 

Charles Hanscomb to Mehitahel Ford, do. 

Edward Robinson to Sarah Green, do. [parishioners. 

Capt. Ralph Beatty to i^/ar^ C. Gardner, both of Chelsea, being 

Josiah Brown to 7i//.:a Barker, both of C. 

Jo^n Daniels, of C, to Elizabeth M. Morse, Haverhill. 

Charles T. Scott to .E/t-a Shattuck, both of C. 

//•a Goodrich to Harriot E. Bai'kcr, do. 



Oct. 


9. 


Nov. 


23. 


Dec. 


10. 




11. 


1824. 


Feb 




17. 


Mch. 


18. 




21. 


Apr. 


1. 




11. 


May 


10. 




16. 




27. 


July 


19. 


Aug. 


30. 


Sep. 


26. 


Dec. 


2. 


1825. 


Jan. 




9. 




23. 


Feb. 


3. 




20. 


Mch. 


20. 


Apr. 


5. 


June 12. 


July 


17. 


Oct. 


16. 




20. 


Dec. 


4. 




5. 



Apr. 


9. 




10. 




12. 




23. 


May 


14. 


Aug. 


27. 


Jet. 


17. 




19. 


Nov. 


2. 




23. 




30. 



Dec. 


5. 


1827 


. Jan. 




18. 




25. 


Feb. 


15. 


Apr. 


.3. 




15. 


June 


14. 


Sep. 


12. 




23. 


Nov. 


1. 




14. 




19. 


Dec. 


24. 


1828. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


7. 


Apr. 


10. 


May 


4. 




22. 


June 


1. 




17. 


July 


21. 




27. 


Aug. 


3. 


Oct. 


17. 


Nov. 


25. 


Dec. 


5. 




28. 


1829. 


Mch, 


Apr. 


12. 




22. 




27. 


May 


28. 


June 


28. 


July 


9. 




12. 




19. 




21. 



MARRIAGES, 1827-1820. 253 

George W. Todd to Lucy Richardson, do. 

lion. Geo. Sullivan, Exeter, N. IL, to PhiUippa Call, of C. 

14. Charles R. Foster to Ann Evans, both of C. 

Sylvester Procter, Cambridge, to Harriot Gar/e, of C. 

David Burgess to Catharine Holmes, both of C. 

David Kelley to Olive Beaverstock, do. [253] 

Daniel Rhodes, Boston, to Ann D. Sprague, of C. 

Samuel Prescoit, Cambridge, to Delia Blanchard, of C. 

Alanson W. Penniman, Boston, to Abigail Whiting, of C. 

William J. Farnsivorth, of C, to Betsy SparreU, of Boston. 

James Barrell to Prudence S. Chessman, both of C. 

Samuel F. Tufts to Fidelia Harrington, both of C. 

Thomas J. Parker to Catharine Stration, do. 

George Passarow to Maria W. Risbrough, both of Boston. The 

latter being my parishioner. 
William Tufts, to Eliza B. Kendall, both of C. 
Silas Stickney, Boston, to Sarah Shattuck, of C. 
Doct. Thomas Wallace, Derry, N. H., to Martha Woodbury, 

Boston, a parishioner. 
31. Frederick Blanchard to Elizabeth Gaw Cooper, both of C. 
William L. Lewis, My parishioner, to Louisa Howe, Boston. 
Samuel S. Sargeant to Charlotte M. Gurney, both of C. 
Thomas Fowler to Phebe Ames, both of C. [254] 

Jonathan Phinney to Sarah Jones, Boston. He my parishioner. 
Joseph Chickering to Florinda [?] Campbell, both of C. 
Henry Tilley, Boston, to Eliza Fletcher, of C. 
Elisha Rogers to Margary Blake, both of C 
Thomas Russell, Cambridge, to Cynthia Janes, of C. 
John Cade to Jane Jones, both of C. 
Joseph Stevens to Hannah Welsh, do. 

Andrew Hall to Martha C. Edmands, do. [of C. 

Rev. Peter Sidney Eaton, Amesbury, to Elisabeth Ann Leman, 
Harvey Witt, Boston, to Hannah Sanborn, of C. 
. 11. Simon Holden, Woburn, to Sarah H. Teel, of C. 
Philip P. Rogers to Ruth Ann Emery, both of C. 
Ebenezer Fifield to Mary A. Wilkins, both of East Cambridge. 

My Parishioners. 
Lieut. A Ivin Edson, New York, to Catharine Henly Soley, of C. 
Hiram Cummings, of C, to Clarissa Ann Wiley, of Lynn. 
Joshua Rich, Maiden, to Ruth Caldwell, of C. [255] 

Osgood Fifield to Nancy Hackett, both of C. 
Samuel Gibson, BrookHne, to Mary Haynes, of C. 
Charles Hall, Dorchester, to Cornelia Fuller, of C. 
Elisha Hayden to Elizabeth J. Sables, both of Medford. Tlie 

Congregational Minister was out of town. 
23. Henry Children, Dover, England, to Anne Underwood, of C. 



254 



EECOKDS OF THE FIRST CHURCH. 



26. Forbes Oakman to Caroline Seargent, both of C. 

Sep. 6. Jonas W. liussell to Sarah Brown, both of Cambridge. Both 

my Parishioners. 

Oct. 20. Joseph Warren J. Niles to Mary P. Rand, both of C. 

Nov. 26. Isaac Bacon, Barnstable, to Lucy Holden, of C. 

Dec. 14. Edward Adams, 2d, to Sarah Brigdon, both of C. 

21. Rev. James Walker to Catharine Barllett, both of C. 
31. Luther Rugg to Eliza Ann Bry [or Bey], do. 

1830. Feb. 24. Simeon Flint to Mary Ketlell, both of C. 
Apr. 6. John Buckman, Lowell, to Susan A. Warren, of C. 

June 22. Jacob Forster, Jr., to Louisa Webb, both of C. [256] 

July 11. Ira A. E. Taylor, Boston, to Hope M. Rich. My Parishioner. 

Aug. 5. Daniel Hanson to Catharine F. E. Jackson, both of C. Colored 

22. Jonas Warner to Nancy Robinson, both of C. [persons. 
31. Thomas Snell Mellen to Rebecca Perry, do. 

Oct. 4. John Doane, Jr., to Sarah C. Hovey, do. [ioner. 

Dec. 7. John Slade, Jr., Boston, to Lucy Lord, East Cambridge, Parish- 

29. William Arnold, Jr., to Adeline Hyde, both of C. 

1831. Jan. 26. William S. Cook to Martha Whiting, both of C. 

Mch. 17. Bradford Lincoln, Jr., Boston, to Ellen Louisa Decens, of C. 

May 5. Oliver Dickson, of C, to Eliza A. Pierce, Maiden. 

15, Nelson Cutter to Lucy Chubb, both of C. 

19. John Reed Campbell to Elizabeth Farnsworth, do. 

31. Jesse E. Dow to Elizabeth Stetson, do. 

Aug. 25. William P. Bullard to Lucy W. Bennett, do. 

Sep. 8. Oilman Stanley to Sabra J. Whiting, do. [257] 

11. Benjamin Mirick to Laura Pratt, do. 

Eckley Stearns, Boston, to Hannah Pratt. Both my Parishioners. 

21. Perez R. Jacobs to Nancy Howe, both of C. 

Nov. 3. Alvan Jewett to Sabra Ann Farmer, both of C. 

8. John Tucker to Abigail Bryant, do. 

27. William M. Burns to Elizabeth Bailey, do. 
Dec. 15. John Bartlett to Abigail Pilhbury, do. 

18. John Young to Phebe Newcomb, do. 

1832. Jan. 19. Rodney Center to Elizabeth F. Page, do. 
Feb. 12. Otis Knight, Cambridge, to Sally Hall, of C. 

Apr. 5. Peter B. Wiley, South Reading, to Hannah Wiley, of C. 

23. Thomas Farmer to Margaret Beaverstock, both of C. 
May 7. Thomas Edwin Hastings to Mary Eliza Thorp, do. 

21. Thacher Magoun, Jr., Medford, to Martha Tufts, of C. 

27. Edward Tilden to Mary Walker, both of C. 

27. Nathaniel Hitchings to Rebekah S. Randall, do. [25S] 

June 3. Erastus Wright, Boston, to Elizabeth Carr, of C. 

14. Jonathan F. Locke, Keene, N. H., to Mary M. Adams, of C. 
Sep. 23. Thomas Rafferty to Sarah Ann Niles, both of C. 

23. William S. Richardson to Ann P. Shedd, do. 



DEATHS, 1789-1790. 255 

Oct. 29. ? Johnson^ Bedford, to Louisa C. Beacerstock, of C. 
Nov. 1. Charles Pool to Charlotte Green, both of C. 
4. Amos Hutchins to Eliza Skimmer, do. 
29. Samuel Bass to Margaret Parker, do. 
Hiram Allen to Margaret Geddes, do. 
Charles Fletcher, Boston, to Susanna Brown, of C. 
Dec. 23. J6hn Young to Prudence Ireland, both of C. 



DEATHS FROM JANUARY, 1789. [1] 

1789. Feb. Jane (a Negro), age 10, of Decay. — Ro/e (a Negro), 75, 

Bilious Fever. 
April. Elisabeth Stearns, 70, Palsy. — Joseph Lamson, 60, Gout. — 

Mrs. Dixon, 44, Consumption. — May. James Brazier, 56, Cancer. 
July. Jonathan Penny, 46, Atrophy. 
Aug. Mr. Con-en's child, 3, Nervous fever. — Mr. D. Deven's do., 

8 mo.. Teething. — Mr. S. Band's do., Still-Bom. 

Sep. Mr. R. Frothingham's do., 10 D., Canker. — Mr. W. H. 
Manning's do., 4 mo.. Decay. — Mr. B. Stimpson's do., 1, Canker. 

Oct. Charles Cordis, 2, Convulsions. — Dinah Foster (Negro), 60, 
Decay. — Quarco (Negro), 70, Hernia. 

Nov. Mrs. Eliz** Powars, 60, Influenza. 

Dec. Sarah Hopping, 56, Consumption. — Peggy Foster, 56, De- 
cay. — Peter Pennington (Mulatto), 45, Consumption. — Mrs. 
Goodioin, 38, Dropsy. — Grace Hurd, 68, Decay. 

No. Inhab" Say 1,060. Births, 52; Deaths, 22; Natural Increase, 
30. Proportion of Deaths as 1 to 48. 

1790. Feb. Margaret Sullivan, 86, Decay. — 7. Richard Cary, 73, Apoplexy. 
March. I. Harding's Daughf, 1, Measles. — Nathan Dexter's Son, 

9 mo., do. 

April. Jn" Hunt's Daugh', 3, Measles. — Jos'* BartleVs Son, 3, do. 

— John Whittemore, 47, Palsy. 
May. John Cary, 56, Decay. — Jefse Fosdick, 33, Putrid fever. — 

John Austin, 84, Cancer. 
June. Jas. Gibh's Daugh"', 1, Dropsy in ye Head. — Jona" Carter's 

Daug', 6 days. Decay. — Sam' Burdit, 56, A Fall. — John Mansir, 

60, and John Mansir, Jr., 28, Drowned. — Benj. Wood, 46, 

Consumption. 
July. Jacob Frothingham's Son, 11 raos.. Convulsions. 
Aug. Bart" Raymond's Daught, 3 D., Schrofulous. — Ann Larkin, 

36, Decay. — Sam' Dexter's Daugh*, 1, Canker. — Sarah Kettell, 

60, Consumption. 
Sep. Isaac Snoto, 30, Consumption. — Tim^ Thompson's Daugh*, 

18 mo., Canker. — Sam' Miller, 34, Drowned. — Sam' Moore's 

Son, 17 mo.. Decay. — John Broomjield's Daugh', 10 mo., Dropsy 

in head. 



256 RECORDS OF TUE FIRST CHURCH. 

Oct. Benj" Mirlck's Son, 3, AVorms. — Charity Raymond, 54. 

Decay. — John Greenes Son, 10 mo.. Teething. — Naph. Neio- 

hair.s Sou, G D., Decay. [Decay, 

Nov. James Manning, 5G, Decay. — Dinah Goodwin (Negro), 90, 
Dec. Jos. Bird^s Daugh', Still- Born. — 25. Catharine Whittemorey 

80, Decay. — 26. Joanna Adams, GO, Decay. 
Number of Inhabitants (1790) estimated at 1,100. Proportion of 

Deaths as 1 to 34. Births, 40; Deaths, 35; natural increase, 5. 

Increase by immigration considerable. 

1791. Feb. 13. Sarah Thoinpson, W. of Jon* Thompr, 2G, Consumption. 

— 15. Stephen Miller, 73, Putrid fever. — A Child of Mr. Cade's 

(Son), 2 rao., Suffocated. 
McH. 1. Hannah Hopping, 24, Consumption. — 12. Polly Cogswell, 

15. Putrid fever. — Eliza Thompson, 8 m., Decay. 
Ai'RiL 26. A Child of Mr. Robbings (Son), 4 m.. Overlaid. — A 

Child of Mr. Phipps (Son), 1, Decay. 
May 21. Thomas Brazier, 56, Bilious fever. — June. Dorcas 

Delany, GO, Decay. — July 25. Daniel Simmonds (Stranger), 26, 

Erysipelas or S' Anthony's Fire. 
Aug. 5. Hepzibah Larkin, 10, Putrid fever. — 12. Betsey Raymond, 

10, Dropsy. — 20. ]\Iaria R. Stevens, D. of Wm. Stevens, 2 y. Gmo., 

Hooping Cough. 
Oct. Joseph Raymond, 3 mo., Decay. — Johnson, wife of Jon* 

Johnson, 44, Putrid fever. — James Gould, 47, Atrophy. 
Dec. 9. Abigail Hurd, Daugh* of B. Kurd, Jr., 3, Hooping Cough. 

— 10. Joanna Swan,BG, Consumption. — 14. Lemuel Sheppard^s 

twin child", 4 days. Decay, one also Still-born. — Andrew Stimp. 

son^s child (D.), 16 mo., Hooping cough. — Mr. [?] Ford's Child 

(Daugh), 4 mo., Decay. — Sep. Josiah Willingion's Son, 3 mo., 

Hooping Cough. — Oct. John Trumbidl [?], 76. Consumption. 
The number of Inhabitants in this Parish this year estimated at 

1,250. — Consequently the proportion of deaths is as 1 to 50. 

Births (1791), 47; Deaths, 25; natural increase, 22. The in- 
crease by immigration much greater. 

1792. Jan. 1. Dr. Thomas Miller's Daugh', 0, Still-born. — 20. Winne- 

frid Brigden, 26, Consumption, Phtisis pulmonalis. 
Feb. Thomas Edes, 55, do. — David Devens, 45, Nervous fever. — 

Elisabeth Johnson, 85, Decay. 
April. Eunice Hooper, 50, Consumption. Ph. Pulmo. — Mary 

Floyd, 50, do. 
May. Joseph Phipps^ Son, Still-born. — Mrs. Leathers, 56, Decay. 

— Naphtali Xeweirs Son, Still-born. [Palsy. 
July. Wm. Wiley's Sou, 16 mo., Decay. — Elisabeth Mallet, Gli, 
Sep. Betsey Hooper, 24, Consumption, Ph. Pulmo. — Joseph Kid- 
der, 7, Convulsions. — Cotton Center's Son, IS mo., Small-Pox. 

— Abigail Edes, 26, do., imprudent. — Hannah Hopping, 30, 



DEATHS, 1792-1796. 257 

do. — Lemuel Sheperd, 3, do., supposed natural way. — Abigail 
Frothinghain, 2, do. — Polly Goodwin, 6 mo., do., rather decay. 
[These last six marked] innoculated. 

Oct. Samuel Austin, 90, Decay. — Lydia //one?, 88, do. — Betsey 
Windship, 2, Natural Small-Pox. — Bandon Temple (Negro), 70, 
do.— Mrs. Wedgwood, 36, do. — Ruth Wood, 81, Decay.— Wm. 
Allen'' s Son, Stillborn. — Sally Wiley, 11, Nervous fever. — Sam' 
Payson^s Son, 1, Canker. — Wm. H. Manning's Son, 6 mo.. Decay. 

Dec. Betsy Devens, 14, Dysentary. — Henry P. Sweetser, 50, 
Hepatitis. 

Births, 46 ; Deaths, 32; uat. increase, 14. Large no. of Emigrants 
added this year. A very healthy year. 

1793. Jan. John Kidder^s Daughter, 10, Dropsy. — Feb. Hepzibah 

Mansir, 24, Phithisis Pulmonalis. — James llayner, 18, do. 

March. Isaac Kidder, 88, Decay. — Jonathan Kettle's Son, still- 
born. — Mary Penny, 70, Decay. — May. Elizabeth Brigden, 
58, Inflamatory fever. 

July. Catharine Kettle, 50, Ph. Pulmo. — 31. Jed^* Edwards Morse, 
10 mo., Gangrene. 

Aug. Amos Tufts' Son, 13 mo., Canker. — Anne Scatter, 89, De- 
cay. — Jno, Brinkley's Daugh'^, 13 mo.. Canker. — Sol" Pkipps* 
Daugh"", 16 mo.. Diarrhea. — Sam'. Rand's Daugh'', 5 mo., do. — 
Aaron Putnam's Daugh', 2, Putrid fever. — Nathan Dexter's Son, 
2, Cho. Dyssentary. — Wm. Codman's Son, 1, do. — Danl Thomp- 
son's Daugh"", 1, do. — Lot Miriam's Daugh', 20 mo., do. 

Sep. Matthew Boatman's Son, 4 mo.. Canker. — Jno. Green's Son, 
13 mo., Quincy. — Jno. Wait's Son, 17 mo.. Decay. — Wm. 
Sargeanf, 44, do. — James Griffith's Son, Stillborn. 

Oct. Wm. H. Manning's Daugh'", 4 days. Decay. — Mr. Prideaux, 
or Paddock, 40, Ph. Pulmo. — Mrs. LeFever, or Levarre, 60, 
Hamoptisis. 

Nov. Eward Newel, 60, Gout. — Isaac Roger's Son, 8 mo. Con- 
vulsions. — Thos. W. Pratt's Daugh"", 19 mo.. Decay. — Dec. 
Hannah Hill, 78, Apoplexy. — Wm. Banton's Son, 2 weeks, 
Convulsions. 

Births, 64; Deaths, 32; nat. increase, 32. Large increase by im- 
migration this year. The growth of y« town rapid. A healthful 
year except Aug. & Sep. 

Died abroad, David Wood. — Jonathan Carter on his passage from 
W. Indies, Put. fev. aged [no dates with these deaths]. 

1794. (26 deaths.) 1795. (38 deaths) [no names or dates entered]. 
1796. Jan. Samuel ilfan.«V's D., 3 weeks. —7th. Isaac Mallet's Child. 

— 10. Obadiah White's D., 4. — Dr. Putnam's ChUd, D. — Dr. 
Bartlett's, 5. —Polly Keyes, 14. —John Green, 22. 

Feb. 11. Hannah Miller, 47. Kendall, 45. —Richard Harris, 

19. — Mr. Long's child. — Goldsmith Sherman, 22.* 

17 



258 EECORDS OF THE FIKST CHURCH. 

Whiting's child. — Isaac Austin, 22.* — Saml Wood, 22.* — A 
negroe man, age unknown. 

April. Samuel Bodge, 53. — May. Knight, 76. — Moody 

Whiting^s Child. — June. James Reid, 32. — 11. Nathaniel 
Gorham, 59. — Ti-ask's Son, infant. 

July. Joanna Swan, 72. t Owebridge [?], 29. — Joseph 

Hurd's child, S., 9 mo. Larkin's child, D. — Parnel 

Boylston, 67. — Polly Harris, 14. 

Aug, PauVs inf. Mullet's inf? Mullet, 86. — 

John Brinkley's S., Q. — Symond's S., 2. — Hetty TFeZ*6, 39. f — 
Anna Rand, 71. f — Geddes child, 1. — Mary Za«6, 29. 

Sep. Jacob Thompson's S., 1. — John Colder' s S., 2. — 9. Pru- 
dence Smith, 36. — Tim" Walker's D., 9 mo. Low's child. 

— Anthony Waters, 36. — Timothy Brigden, 70. f — Anna Mirick, 
70.t — John Goodwin's S., 1. —Edward Burditt, 28.* — Abraham 
Rand's S., 1. — Peter {negro), child, 2. — James Sweetser, 22.* 

— 29th. Isaac Mallett, 71. 

Oct. 1. Choate's S., 9. — AV/on's S., 2. — Sarah Ca«, 91. f — 
John Brinkley's S., 2. — Hannah Larkin, 30. — Nov. Joseph 
5jVf/'5 child, D. — Mary Barrett, 59. — Dan! Scott's D. — Sally * 
Skimmer, 24. — Dec. Wait Pratt's child. — Abigail Lord, 92.t .' 

N. B. Stillborn this year, three. — f Members of y* Chh., 7. — 
* Died abroad, 5. Deaths, 65; Births, 83; natural Increase, 18. 
This year has been healthy. No prevalent mortal disease. 
Notwithstanding it has been a remarkably dying year. The 
Parish has increased greatly by immigrations. | 

1797. Jan. 1. Mary Paine, 56, Fistula. — 5. Nath' Rand's Son, 3, Quin- I 
sey. — 28. George Calder, news of his death arrived from the W. • 
Indies, 32, Yellow fever, at Demerary. — 31. J. P. Duncklee's 
Son, 2 mo., Decay. 

Feb. 8. Sam'. Frothingham's Son, 1 day, Fits. — 13. George Runey, 
39, Dissentary, or West India flux. — 20. N. Trask's Son, 8 days, 
Fits. — 22. Lydia Duncklee, 38, Phithisis Pulmonalis. — Moody 
Whiting's Son, stillborn. 

March 8. Barker (Widow), 76, Decay. — 9. Hannah Breed, 

14, Consumption. — 12. Mary Curven, 43, Cancer in womb. — 
16. Eldad Whiting's Son, Stillborn. — 19. Fanny Russell, 17, 
Nervous fever. — Sam. Niles', Jr., Son, Stillborn. 

April 6. Eben' Gage's Daugh^ 2, Quinsey. — 14. Elisabeth 
Phipps, 75, Decay. — 22. John Keyes, Jr., 19, Nervous fever. — 

28. Hannah Jackson, 42, Apoplexy. — May 10. James Breed, 

29, Con.sumption. — 11. Sam'. Austin's Son, 4, Fits. 

June 2. Wm. Knap/el's Son, 10 mo.. Canker, — 5. Elisabeth Bisp- 
ham, 72, Palsey. — 26. Harriet H. Talbot, 23, Phthisis Pulm., 
died at Menotomy, Cambridge. — 29. Sally Frothingham, 26, 
Phthisis Pulm. 



DEATHS, 1797-1819. 259 

July 2. Betsey Itayner, 20, do., do. — 4. Richard Miller, 78, De- 
cay. — 17. David Wood, 87, Caucer. — 21. Abigail Kemble, 27, 
Ph. Pulm. 
Aug. 15. Rich^i Pierce, 40, drowned. — 21. Gi-ijjin^s negro child, 

9 mo., Fitts. 
Sep. 2. Milicent Ball, 56, Decay. — 5. Wm. H. Manning's Son, 
5 mo.. Canker. — 6. Rebecca Frothingham, 48, Dropsy. — Jn" 
Harris' Son, 16 mo., Convulsions. — 15. Hannah Rhodes, 83, 
Decay. 
Oct. 6. Jed"^ Morse's Son, 5 mo., Inflammation of y^ brain occa- 
sioned by a fall. — 7. Elisabeth Taylor, 33, Nervous fever. — 

13. Ayer's Son, 13 mo., Dissentary. — 14. Wm. Leathers, 

65, Plepatitis. — 20. Betsey Rohhins, 8, Worms. — 27. Isaac 
Mallet's Son, 10 weeks. Canker. — James Frothingham' s Son, 5, 
Dissentary. 
Nov. 5. Bela Mitchell, 37, Putrid fever, tanner & butcher. — 15. 
Betsey Hall, 27, do., or Bilious fever. — 30. Sam^ Sprague's Son, 
14 rao., Decay. 
Dec. 19. Hannah Brazier, 53, Consumption. — 20. Elkanah 
Welch, 72, do. — 23. Anna Lijnch, 96, Old age. — 29. Mrs. 
Baker, about 30. 
Total, 50. 1 upwards of 90; 2 between 80 and 90; 5 do., 70 and 80. 
[Names of those who died were not recorded after this date, but some sta- 
tistics are given.] 

No. of Deaths in Charlestoivn tvitJiin the Neck. 

1798, 40, of whom 3 were between 80 and 90, 8 upwards of 50. — 1799, 
60 (?), of whom 7 were above 60. — 1800 [blank]. — 1801, 95, of whom 2 
were upwards of 70. — 1802, 70. — 1803, 57 (do., 6). — 1804, 68 (do., 9). 
— 1805, 76 (do., 5). — 1806, SO (do., 6). — 1807, 90, of whom 2 ab. 90, 5 
bet. 80 and 90, 8 bet. 70 and 80. — 1808, 7S. — 1809, 81, of whom 3 were 
chh. members, 4 above 70. Population about 3,500 (1 in 45). — 1810, 63, 
of whom 6 were above 70; population about 4,000, 1 to 63. — 1811, 100 
(3 — 80 — 90; 13 = 70 — 80; 6 = 60 — 70). — 1812, 93 (2 = 80—90; 
5 = 70 — 80; 4 = 60 — 70). — 1813, ii5 (3 above 80; 7 = 70 — 80; 5 = 
60 — 70; 7 = 50 — 60; 17 = 40 — 50; 10 = 30 — 40; 12 = 20 — 30; 7 = 
10 — 20; and 47 under 10, of whom 28 were infants. Beside 27 soldiers 
died, in town, & about 20 at the Marine Hospital and State's Prison). 
1814, 79 (2 above 80; 4 = 70 — 80 ; 11 = 40 — 70; 37 4 and under). 
ISlo, 109 {Q above 80; 11 = 70 — 80; 34 = 30—70; 36, 2 yrs. and 
under; see Ser. on I. Kings, 18, 21, preached Jan. 7, 1816). 

1816, i;g5(2above80; 10 = 70— 80; 5 = 60 — 70; 15 = 40 — 60; 25 = 
20 — 40; 24 = 2 — 20; 24 under 2; 20 still born). — 1817, 163 (2 above 
80 ; 6 = 70 — 80 ; 12 = 50 — 70 ; 50 = 20 — 50; 90 under 20, of whom 63 
were infants). A sickly year. — 1818, 92 (1 above 80; 5 = 70 — 80; 8 = 
60—70; 33 = 20 — 60; under 2, 23). 

1819, 128 (5 above 80; 3 = 70 — 80; 4 = 60 — 70; 7 = 50 — 60; 12 = 
40 — 50; 13 = .30 — 40; 17 = 20 — 30; 13 = 4 — 20; 37 under). 



260 EECOEDS OF THE FIRST CHURCH. 

[The statistics, kept to this date by Dr. Morse, are continued by Dr. Fay.] 

Deaths. Under 10. 10-20. 20-30. 30-40. 40-50. 60-60. 60-70. 70-80. 80-90. 90-100- 



1820. 


90 


51 


3 


7 


6 


4 


8 


4 





5 




1821. 


114 


82 


1 


17 


U 


12 


8 


3 


6 


1 




1822. 


105 


54 


3 


5 


11 


13 


5 


6 


4 


4 




1823. 


83 


40 


5 


8 


10 


6 


6 


3 


1 


4 




1824. 


87 


38 


3 


10 


10 


7 


5 


4 


3 


5 


2 


1825, 


IGG 


78 


10 


28 


14 


5 


11 


8 


8 


4 




182G. 


135 


66 


6 


12 


8 


IG 


15 


5 


6 




1 


1827. 


115 


54 


6 


17 


17 


8 


4 


3 


4 


1 


1 


1828. 


96 


59 


3 


9 


G 


6 


G 


G 


1 


1 




1829. 


106 


52 


5 


17 


12 


5 


5 


7 


4 


1 




1830. 


90 


15 


2 


4 


8 


9 


3 


5 


6 


1 


1 



Not including the public Establishments, State Prison, M'^Lean Hospital, 
Marine Hospital, Navy Yard, and Almshouse (12 in the last, 1828). 1830 
does not include " the Catholics." 

A considerable amoiiut of Charlestoivn Records are printed. 

Laind Records, 1638-1802, including the "Possessions," 1638; Streets, 1670; 
Surveys, 171B-14, 1767, and 1802, etc., are in the Third Report of the Record Com- 
missioners, Boston, 2d ed., 1883. — Extracts from the Town Records, 1646 to 1814, 
quite full, and many of them imi)ortaut, made by ^Ynl. Sawyer, are in the B. Hill 
Aurora, 1838 (Bib., p. 60), of which there is a file in the C. Public Library. — 
Church Records, complete, 1632-1789, were prepared by James F. Hunnewell. See 
Bib., and p. 193. Also 1789-1832, on pp. 193-260. —Those of t\\e Harvard 
Church since 1816 were prepared by H. H. Edes (Bib., p. 87). — JIany extracts 
from Church, Lodge, Society, and Town Records are in publications to which the 
Bibliography directs. 

"The Genealogies and Estates" of C, 1629-1818 (2 vols., 1880), also contains 
an immeuso number of items from Records and other sources, but by no means all 
the personal data available (compare List, pp. 157-74, Church Record above, and 
pp. 193-259, herein). The author died when his proof-reading had extended only 
a few i)ages, and an arduous labor was committed by him to his editor, who was 
thus obliged to follow, to great extent, the MS. as he left it. Modest as he was 
laborious, the author would hardly have claimed that he had found and done every- 
thing, yet he did a vast deal. He had a strong attachment to his native town, Jind 
no expression of it could be more touching than his when the writer congratulated 
him that his life-work had rciched the printer. He raised both hands and threw 
back his head with a silent look of heart-f'lt delight, and that look was on his face 
when the writer for the last moment saw him. 

The manuscript Records of the Town were in much need of care, arrangement, 
and binding ; indeed some of them were only bound in boxes or barrels. Accord- 
ingly one of the last acts of the City Council (1873) was to appropriate funds for 
this purpose. Fortunately there was a native who has a strong regard for the old 
place, and an iutelligent conception of good work. To him was assigned the labor 
now approaching completion. The necessary expenditures will probably leave him 
with the frequent reward gained in services for histor}', — a clear conscience and 
invisible pecuniary profits ; but the liecords of the old town will be in thorough 
order, associated, as they should be, with the name of Henrv H. Edes. 



Or aJ 
IV A TCH-'lFO^T> 

Fronjrour Lord lefus Chriji unto his Cburches: 

Efpccially tho/e within the Colony of the MASSACHUSETS 

In ^SU^-^EIN^qLA^KP 
To take heed of ^^^Jlacy : 

O R 

A Treatifeof Rcnnembrancc of what God hath been tou&, as alfo 
what we ought, and what we ought not to be to him, as wc dc- 
fire the prolonging of our Profpcrous Dayes in the Land which 
she Lord our God hath given us. 

By Thomas Sbepard, Teacher of the Church of Chrift jn 
Charljiown ; 

Who vpat appointed by the (iJ^apftrates^to Preach on the day of 

ELECTION 

.(3r-Bofton, May //. 1672. 



Deut.S.iOj&cJF^cw thcu bajl, Bateyi^and-art full^thenthoa Jhalt 
Bkji the Lord th} God^for the good Uant whuhhe hath givtn thee : Jie- 
roareifout thou forget not the Lord thy God in KOt^ke^prng iits' Com- 
manQments.,&c.-i.c/l Vi.hcn thou ha Jl eaten md art full—.-thme Heart 
he itftedu^^ andthouforgn the Lord thy God. 

Chap 5.32,33. 7t \hall obfervt to do thtrefote ai the Lord pur Ged 
hath (ommanticdjou : jou jha/l not turn afide to the right hand or to the 
Icff^yoHJhall 'viaikjn all the waycs which theLord your God hathCom- 
mandcd y ou, that ye may live, and that it may be well with you, and 
ihat ye may Prolong your dayes in the I^and which ye (hall poffefs. 

Cambridge Printed by Samuel Green. 1^73. 



A BIBLIOGRAPHY 

OF CHARLESTOWN, MASS., and BUNKER HILL. 



Additions to this work by the writer (8°, pp. viii + 100, three fac- 
similes) with about 1,100 titles, published by Jas. R. Osgood & Co., 
Boston, 1880. — Also, lists o/ native and resident authors,'^ and of works 
printed in the town from 1786 to 1836. 

A lot of books and pamphlets, — hundreds of them, — some old or 
shabby, or looking as if no one had ever cared to use them ; many of 
them obscure ; enough of them apparently uninteresting, and nearly 
all scarce, or very scarce, — what do they, except some of the recent 
books, amount to ? is a common enough thought or question. " Paper- 
stock" is, or was, a not infrequent answer, and accordingly only few 
copies have survived. They are something very different, others know, 
who gather and save them ; for they are an important portion of the 
intellectual record of the people in an old American town, that has 
been slowly made since the country was settled. It was not an aca- 
demic seat, like Cambridge, or a capital like Boston, neither was it a 
small, obscure place ; but it was a large, active, fairly representative 
town, and the printed work of its inhabitants, from first to last, is very 
well worth an index. 

None of these books or pamphlets were written or issued without a 
purpose, or a conviction that they were needed or desirable. Ideas, 
beliefs, or plans at the time are shown, — it may be only those con- 
sidered important enough, or that were somehow lucky or unlucky 
enough to be printed, — yet they are, after all, some of the best evi- 
dence we have of the thought and feeling of eight generations. 

No more preface is needed, and the writer continues his work pub- 
lished in 1880, with the thoxight that while he then named everything 

1 Those of single reports or addresses, and works of residents after leaving the 
town, are generally omitted. Books and pamphlets only, are mentioned, and arti- 
cles in periodicals or newspapers are not, except in regard to Bunker Hill, and in 
a few cases for special reason. 



Vir^- 



262 A BIBLIOGRAPHY 

he could find after laborious search, and while he has added much, no 
Bibliography is complete. It is one of the things in which we do and 
offer the best we can, without claim to omniscience. 

Every one of our old to^vns needs such an index, and each of the 
local libraries, now happily growing numerous, should have the local 
works it would mention. The writer's experience for years past is 
that persistent search — that only — with the chief reliance on pur- 
chase, can form it, but the time for doing so is fast passing away. 

In preparing this Bibliography, he has the pleasure of acknowledg- 
ing kind help from the late Admiral G. H. Preble, the Hon. Saml A. 
Green, Judge J. W. Austin, Mr. A. E. Cutter, Mr. E. M. Barton, and 
Mr. E. F. Everett ; also, while printing the book, other aid from Miss 
Helen Hurd, Dr. E. J. Forster, and Mr. H. H. Edes ; and in enlarg- 
ing the work, aid from Miss Mary F. Andrews, Mr. T. G. Frothingham 
(and his father's collection), Mr. C. H. Guild, and Mr. E. N. Coburn ; 
also from authors for notes of their works, fui-nished by Dr. C. S. 
Cartee, Mr. A. E. Cutter, the Hon. Charles Devens, the Rev. R. M. 
Devens, Dr. E. J. Forster, Gen. J. F. B. Marshall, Mr. J. B. O'Reilly, 
Admiral Preble, the Rev. A. S. Twombly, D.D., and Mr. W. W. Wheil- 
don. Help has also been found in several libraries, public or society, 
and not a little in sale catalogues. 



BEFORE THE REVOLUTION. 



A Chaine of SCRIPTURE Chroxologie from the Creation of the 
WORLD to the death of lESVS Christ, in feven Periods. By 
[Rev.] TLhomas] A [lien]. Title within a border engraved by W. 
Hollar. [^Facsimile in the Bibliography.'] Sm. 4°. pp. iv -f- 240, 
eight folding charts. London, 1659. 

The Same, pp. ii -|- 240, Printed and " sold by John Allen, that for- 
merly lived at the Sun ri/ing in Little Britain, and now lives at the 
While Horje in ^Yentvcor^h ftreet near White cliappeiy London, 1068. 

The Rev. Thos. Allen was one of two out of the eleven ministers of the First 
Church before the Revolution who returned to England, and who did not die 
in the ministry of the Church. 
The I PARABLE ] op the | Ten Virgins | Opened & Applied ; | Being 
the Subflance of divers | SERMONS | on Matth. 25. 1,-13. * * * 
Now Publifhed from the Authours own Notes, at the defires of many, 
for the common Benefit of the Lords peoijle. By Jonathan Mitchell, 
Rlinifter at Cambridge, Tho. Shepard, Sou to the Reverend Author, now 
!Minifter at Charles-Town in New England. Sm. folio, pp. viii -|- 
240 + 203 -f- 5. Printed by J. H. for John Rothwell and Samuel 
T/tom/on. London, IGOO. 



1 



OF CHARLESTOWN, MASS. 263 

' The Same. *' Re-printed, and carefully Corrected in the Year 1695. " 

Sm. folio, pp. vi ■+ 232 + 190 + 5. No place. \_London, 1G95.] 

The Same, 2 vols, Falkirk, 1797, and (with a Biographical Preface by 

Jas. Foote, D.D.). 8°. pp. xviii + ix — xiv + ii -j- 17 — 592. 

Aberdeen (also Edinburgh and London) 1853. 

Hilton, Wm. A Relation of a Discovery lately made on the Coast of 
Florida (31° to 33°, 45, N.) in the ship Adventure from Barbadoes in 
1663. 4to. London, 1664. The Same, Bristol, for R. Moon, 1664. 

There is a copy in the British Museum, and one was in the library of the late 
Peter Force. The author (?) married Mehetabel Nowell (1659), and was ad- 
mitted to the Church (1670), both in C, and died in 1675. 

Oakes, Rev. U. Elegie on Rev. Thomas Shepard. 4°. pp. 16. 

Cambridge, 1677. 
In Thomas's "Hist, of Printing" (Arch. Amer., V. 70), in the ante-Revolu- 
tionary Publications (do., VI. 316), and in Kettell's "American Poetry" 
(1829, III. 379), it is stated that this work was printed in 1668, — the last 
says at Boston, as also (but in 1677) says Mr. Frothingham ("Hist, of C," 
191). 1668 is seven years before the press was established there, and nine 
years before Mr. Shepard died. The true title is shown by & facsimile in tlie 
Bibliography. It is possibly the earliest title of a poem both written and 
printed within the limits of the United States. 

Thatcher, Rev. Thos. A Fast of God's chusing, Plainly opened. A 
Fast Sermon. 4°. pp. 6 -}- 25. Introduction by Rev. I. Mather. 

Boston, 1678. 

The author, first pastor of the "Old South," Boston, was a member of the 
1st ch. in C, Oct. 24, 1669, to Feb. 16, 1670. 
[Thompson, Benjamin.] '■'■New Enrjland's Cri/is. | The | Prologue." 
A Poem on Philip's War. Sm. 8°. pp. 31. [1675 or 1676?] 

The poet (who died in 1714, aged 74) was teacher of the Town School, C, 
Jan., 1670/71 to Nov. 7, 1674; consequently the above must have been writ- 
ten after he left (?) C. The only copy found by the writer (B. A.) lacks the 
title-page and one leaf, and begins on A 3 (p. 5) and ends, as does the work, on 
B4 (p. 31). Under fom-teen lines (p. 29) on " Cliehnsf or d's F&te," are eight 
lines in small italics, to which, at the foot of the page, is added in print "B. 
Tompfon." Nearly all publications in N. E. to 1679, except Almanacs, were 
folio and 4°; but this, like "Anne Bradstreet's Poems," Boston, 1678, was 16° 
or small 8°. " In the beginning of April (1676) they [the Indians] did fome 
mifchief at Chelmsford," says Increase Mather (Brief Hist., 1676), so that 
"The Crisis " must have been printed after that date ; and if it was in the same 
year, its interest rivals that of "The Elegie." 

Lord, Rev. Joseph. Reason Why, not Anabaptist Plunging But Infant- 
Believer's Baptism Ought to be approved, is because the Lord Jesus 
Christ and His Apostles, Preached it and Practiced it. In Answer 
to the Anabaptist Reason Why. Sm. 12°. pp. (2), 8, 170. Printed by 
S. Kueeland for Samuel Gerrish, at his Shop in Cornhill. Boston, 1719. 



264 A BIBLIOGRAPHY 

See Bibliography, 1748 (p. 9). He was a native of C, vrho went to the Caro- 
linas, and is said to have administered the lirst Communion there Feb. 2, 1696. 
At his departure was the Eev. John Danforth's Sermon, " Kneeling to God, At 
Parting with Friends." (12°. pp. 72, Boston, 1697.) 

Eleazer Phillips (Bib., p. 6), the first bookseller in C, and only 
one before the Revolution, published a few small books, now extremely 
rare, of which the writer has found four, as follows : — 

Three Practical Discourses. I. Man's La/t End, by Mr. J. Janeway. 
II. A Golden Chain of Four Links: or, The Four Laft Things Briefly 
Difcours'd of. With Some Directions to Die well, in order to Avoid 
Hell, and obtain Heaven. III. A Sermon on Dives & Lazarus. Pub- 
lifhed for the greater Comfort of thofe that tafte the Bitterness of 
Affliction, The Two Laft, by famous Authors. Bo/ton: Printed by 
T. Fleet and T. Crump, for Eleazar Phillips in Charle/town. 1715. 
Small 12°. pp. 96. 

DoRRiNGTON, Theopliilus. "A familiar Guide to the right-profit.ible re- 
ceiving of the Lord's Supper, wherein also The Way and ]\Iethod of 
our Salvation is briefly and plainly declared. Seventh Edition. Bos- 
ton, Re-Printed by J. Franklin for Eleazer Phillips at Charlestown and 
Sold at his Shop. 1718. 

Vital Chri/lianity : \ A brief | Essay | On the Life of God, ] in the | Soul 
of Man ; ] Produced and Maintained by a | Christ living in us : | and | 
The Mystery of a Christ | Within Explained. | Printed by Samuel 
Keimer for Eleazer Phillips in Charles-Town in New England, and sold 
at Rice Peter's in Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. Sm. 8°. pp. {4), 
30 + 1. 1725. 

The last page has a notice of an Almanac for 1726 to be issued, and the fol- 
lowing paragraphs: "Printed by Samuel Keimer, in Philadelphia, where 
Country-Chapmen and all ShojJ-Iccepers may be furnished there with. And 
also Sold by Eleazer Phillips in Charlestown, in Neio England." The only 
copy kno\^'n to the writer is in the Prince Library ; it has a recent MS. state- 
ment on the title " By C. ilather." It is not in any ;Mather collection known 
to the writer, or in Mr. Brinley's of works by Keimer (15 from 1724 to 1729). 
Keimer iirintcd pamphlets on a poor press, kept a small shop and sold blanks, 
candles, soap, etc. (Arch. Anier., V. 231.) Phillips had the " Dorrington," 
1718, printed by James Franklin in Boston, and may thus have become ac- 
quainted with his brother Benjamin, who in 1723 went to Phil* and worked 
for Keimer (but was in London in 1725). 

Stevens, Rev. Joseph. Another and Better Country, 1723 (See Bib., 
p. 7). Printed by 5. Kneeland for E. Phillips at his Shop in Charlef- 
town. Preface, pp. xii, by Benj. Colman, Boston, Feb. 18, 1723. 
The second Sermon, The Heavenly Country (at p. 31) has only a 
heading, but the third, on Rev. Wra. Brattle (at p. 71) has a full titlo 
with a black border, but not the name of Phillips. 



OF CHARLESTOWN, MASS., AND BUNKER HILL. 265 

Abbot, Rev. Hull. Early Piety Deforibed and Recommended. \ A | Ser- 
mon I Preach'd to a Society | of | Young Men | EN ffi?^S[3£l2llHS- 
2L©JroW, I July 8*" 1739. | (Two texts.) Boston: Printed by S. Knee- 
land and T. Green, in Queen-street over agaiuft the Prifon, 1739. 
8°. pp. (2), ii, 24. 

The Dedication, dated C, August 10th, 1739, is]" To the Society of Young 
Men in Charlestown, who are United together for the Exercifes of Religion on 
the Lord's Day Evenings," etc. 

FowLE, Daniel. A | Total Eclipse of LIBERTY: | Being a true and 
faithful Account of the Ar- | raignment, and Examination of Daniel 
Fowle I before the Honorable Houfs of Reprefen- | tatives of the Prov- 
ince of the Massachu/etts- \ Bay in New-England, Octob. 24th, 1754, | 
barely on Sufpicion of his being concern'd in | Printing and Publifh- 
ing a Pamphlet, intitled, | The Monfter of Monfters. | Alfo his Im- 
prifonment and Sufferings, etc. Written by Himself. 16°. pp. 32. 
Boston, Printed in the Year 1755. [Another ed. 12°, Boston, 1775.] 

A PLAIN I Narrative | Of the | Uncommon Sufferings, | and | remark- 
able Deliverance | of | Thomas Brown | Of Clmrlefioion, in New Eng- 
land; I who returned to his Father's Houfe the Beginning of | Jan. 
1760, after having been abfent three Years and | about eight Months : | 
etc. Sm. 8°. pp. 27. Fowle and Draper. Boston, 1760. 

Born in C, 1740, he enlisted with Maj. Rogers's Eangers, and was a prisoner 
with the Indians or French most of the time named. The Brinley copy of this 
very rare little book (sold to the Library of Congress) brought $30. 

Devens, Richard. A Comment on some passages in the Book of Job (A 
Poem). 8°. pp.15. Boston, 111^. Another issue, A Paraphrase on 
some parts of the Book of Job. pp. 39. Boston, 1795. 

The author (C, 1749-1835) published two other works, pamphlets (in C), 
now very rare (see Bib., pp. 36, 88), or, really four works; and not one only 
as stated in G. and E., p. 291. 

[Badger, Rev. Stephen.] Address of a Minister to the Church under his 
Pastoral Care, in which it is inquired, " Whether a Church is obliged, 
or authorized" by the New Testament, to require public Confession 
of Misdemeanors, Passages Examined, "Objections answered — and 
the Negative Side of the Question (it is apprehended) conclusively es- 
tablished." 8°. pp. 44. Printed for and sold by E. Battelle, near 
the State-House. Boston, 1784. 

The author lived in C. (p. 136), was admitted to the church July 14, 1750, 
and was a missionary to the Natick Indians. (Other works see Bib., p. 11.) 

BUNKER HILL. 

Address of the B. H. M. Ass'n to the Selectmen of the several towns in 
Mass. pp. 12 (see p. 27). An edition with an Address to the Citizens 
of C, dated C, Nov. 12, 1824, and signed by John Harris, Chairman 
of the Selectmen. 



266 A BIBLIOGRAPHY 

BixBY, Sam\ Diary, 1775, in Frothingham's Illustrations of the Siege of 

Boston and Mass. Hist. Soc. Proceedings, March, 1876. 
Bradford, Alden. Complete and Authentic History of the Battle of B. 
H. 8°. Boston, 1825. 

This is another edition of "A Particular Account" by him (Bib., 1825). 
Bunker Hill, Battle of. A Full and Correct Account, pp. 8. 

Boston, 1825. 

Companion to the Historical Paintings of the Battle of B. H. 24° 

size. pp. 24. Printed by B. True. Boston, 1807. 

An explanation of several panoramas exhibited. 

Illustrated Almanac, with a List of Societies in C. and their officers. 

12°, unpaged. Office of the B. H. Times, 1876. 
BuRNHAM, Maj. John. Recollections of the Revolutionary War from B. H. 
to Yorktown. 8°. pp. 16. (Soldier from Gloucester, 2 pp. on the 
battle.) {Gloucester, 1881.] 

CoLViLL, Rev. Mr. [Robert]. Poetical Works. 8°. pp. (8), 276. 

London, 1789. 

On p. 121 is a poem "To the m^moryof Major Pitcairn, And his very gallant 
Fellow Officers and Soldiers, who fell in their Country's Caufe, in purfuit of Vic- 
tory, againft the Rebels, at Bunker's Hill, July [sic] 17, 1775." On pp. 183-190 
is another poem, "To the Memory of Allan Malcolm, Esq. ; of Lochore, Heir and 
Eepresentative of the ancient Knights Baronets of Lochore, Captain in the 33d 
Regiment of Foot, who was mortally wounded at the head of the Advanced 
Guard, in the moment of victory, over the Provincial Army, and Expired with 
many brave Gentlemen on the field of battle, before the walls of Charleftown." 

Cressy, Noah. B. H. Battle, Monument, and Grand Celebration. A 
Poem. 12°. pp. 12. Portland, 1849. — The Battle and Monument 
of B. H. compared with the Agonies and Triumphs of the Cross. A 
Poem. 12°. pp. 24. Do., n. d. 

CoOLiDGE, Geo. A. Brochure of Bunker Hill. With (1.5) Heliotype 
Views (and 5 cuts). Oblong 12° (?). pp. 32. Printed covers. Pub- 
lished by Jas. R. Osgood & Co. Boston, [1875]. 

DuEWE, Maj. Ed. (35th Reg. Foot). The Case of , Published by Himself, 
pp. 103. Exeter, 1782. 

The Appendix contains notes of his bravery and services at B. H. 

Drama. The Fall | of ] British Tyranny: | or ] American Liberty | Tri- 
umphant, I The First Campaign. | A Tragi-Comedy of Five Acts, | as 
lately planned | At the Royal Theatrum Pandemonium | at St. 
James's. | The Principal Place of Action in America, | Published ac- 
cording to Act of Parliament. Philadelphia : Printed by Styner and 
Cist, in Second-street, near Arch-street, 1776. — The Same, 12°, 
pp. 71, reprinted by John Gill, and Powars and Willis, in Queen-Street, 
Boston, New-England, n. d. — The Same, sm. 8°, pp. 66, Printed by 
J. Douglass M<=Dougall, on the West Side of the Great Bridge, n. d. 



OF BUNKER HILL. 267 

In Act III., sc. and 7, are references to the Battle of B. II. Like 

all early literature about the battle these three pamphlets are very rare. 
Emmons, W™ An Address commemorative of the Battle of B. II., June 

17, 1775. 8°. pp. 16. Published for the Author by John Quincy 

Adams. Boston, 1834:. 

" Fresh news just arrived," a handbill (N. Y.) reprinted in Mag. of Am. 

History, March, 1885, p. 282. 
Gridley, Col. Rich"", at B. H., and his Monument. D. T. V. Huntoon in 

Memorial Services, Canton, May 30, 1877. 8°. pp. 31. Boston, 1877. 
Haskell, Caleb. Diary, May 5, 1775, to May 30, 1776. 8°. pp. 23. 

[pp. 6-7, notes on battle of B. H.] Newburyport, 1881. 

Holmes, Dr. O. W. Grand-mother's Story of Bunker Hill Battle. Illus- 
trated, in colors, by H. W. M« Vicker. Sm. 4°. pp. 32. N. York, 1883. 
Journals of Two Private Soldiers, 1758-75, Poughkeepsie, 1855. (pp. 58, 

59, a short account of the battle by Sam. Haws, of Wrentham, Mass., 

who was not in it.) 
Letters written at the time of the occupation of Boston by the British, 

1775-6, communicated to the Essex Institute by Wm. P. Upham. 

8°. pp. 90. Salem, 1876, and Coil's E. I., xiii., July. Several of 

the letters are from C. 
Levasseur, a. Lafayette en Amerique en 1824 et 1825, 2 vols. 16°. 

Paris, 1829 (Bib. p. 25). Translations were published in N. York 

and Philadelphia, 1829, both in 2 vols. 
Memorial for Losses June 17, 1775 (Bib., p. 88), — should be "House 

Doc. 55, 1st Session, 23d Congress, 1834" (not "55, Mass. Leg."). 
Newspaper articles. Several are reproduced in Moore's Diary of the Am. 

Revolution, I. 97, 102. — Boston Gazette article, June 19, 1775, is in 

Frothingham's Centennial. — Mass. Spy (Bib., p. 19), — should be 

" Worcester." 
Paintings. Precis Historique sur la Bataille de Bunkers-Hill, donne pres 

Boston, dans le Massachuset, le 17 Juin 1775, pour servir d'explica- 

tion au pre'mier des XIV. Tableaux representant les Eve'nements les 

plus memorable qui ont contribues a etablir I'independance des XIII. 

Provinces-Unis de I'Ameriqiie Septentrionale. Sm. 4°. pp. 6. Lon- 

dres, 1786. — Lettre au Sujet de Deux Tableaux peints par le Colonel 

Trumbul, Araericain. 12°. pp. 10. s a. et I. 
Plan of the Battle on B. H., etc. A broadside. London, Nov. 27, 1775. 

Rep. in Moore's Ballad Hist. (Bib. p. 16). 
Putnam, D., on Gen. L P. (Bib., p. 16), is in Conn. Hist. Soc. Coll. I. 
Robinson, j\I. M. Verses to a young lady on the death of her brother 

slain in the late engagement at Boston. London, 1776. 

Swett, S. NotestohisSketchofB.H. Battle, pp.24. £os/on, Dec, 182.5. 
" Mr. Webster's Address at Bunker Hill, June 17, 1775 [from the Origi- 



268 - A BIBLIOGRAPHY 

nal Maniiscript]. pp. 15. Boston: J. N. Bradlee & Co., Daily Mail 
Ofl&ce," with au Account of the Celebration. (The early date of the 
orator's work is printed in large figures.) 
Warren, Maj.-Gen. J. Memoir of, in the Boston Monthly Mag., II. 1, 
June, 1S2G, by the editor, Sam. L. Knapp. — A white marble bust of 
the Geu. iu front of the W. lus. Savings (p. 118) was by P. Stevenson 
(about 18G6), and $200 were voted for it. 

Iimericaa; %ttUx&, ^tatcmcntss, etc. (See Bib., p. 19.) 

Belknap, Dr. (Bib., p. 20). See also Belknap Papers, Mass. Hist. Soc, 

Ser. V. iii, 163, 166. 
Bradford, J. (do.). See N. H. Provincial Papers, vii. 523. 
Brown, Dr. Geo., Letter, June 25. See "Evelyns in America," p. 171. 
Cheever, David, do. from Watertown to Prov. Congress. N, H. Prov. 

Papers, vii. 521. 
Committee of Safety, Account to Congress. See Hist. Mag , June, 1868. 

p. 371, and Analectic Mag., May, 1818. —Do. to England, See Ellis 

(1843), 131, and Dawson's Battles, i. 68. 
Early news of the battle. See N. H. Prov. Papers, vii. 520. 
Elliot, Rev. And., Letter. See Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc, 1878, p. 228. 
Fellows, J. The Veil Removed. 16°. A^cw York, 1843. 
Greene, Gen., to Gov. Cooke, R. I., in Sparks's MSS., vol. 48. 
HoLYOKE, Dr. Account (June 17, 1775). See Essex Ins. Coll. xiii. 212. 
Officers in the Battle. List in the N. E. Hist.-Gen. Register, April, 1873, 

and an English list of Yankee officers, June. 1775, in do., July, 1874. 
Order of the earliest American accounts is given in the Mem. Hist, of 

America, VI. 184, where they are arranged by date instead of authors. 
Smith, Isaac, from Salem, June 30, 1775. See Mass. Hist. Soc. Proc, 

xvi. 291. 
Stark, Col. John, to Cont. Congress. See N. H. Prov. Papers, vii. 322. 
Thompson, C. (in connection with Dr. D. Ramsay). N. Y. Hist. Soc. 

Coll., 1878, p. 216. 
Webb, Lt. S. B. Original MS. of letter from Cambridge, Oct. 16, with 

vol. 1789 Brinley library sold N. Y. March, 1878. 

■Pttitkcr fjill Ittonumcnt Association ; Additions (Bib., p. 27). 

Broadside (large). Address to the Selectmen for a Day of Thanksgiv- 
ing, 1824. — Report, Address, and heading of a Subscription. Folio, 
pp. 3. 1829. — Certificate of Membership of the Ass?. A sheet 34 X 
23 inches, engraved, with a view of the battle and one of the monu- 
ment (1833?). 

Proceedings published annually in S° (continued from Bib., p. 28), 
1880, pp. 45-f-l, address by Hon. F. W. Lincoln; 1881, pp. 74, ad- 
dress by Hon. R. C. Winthrop ; 1882, pp. 46 -f 1, address by Hon. F. 



OF CHARLESTOWN, MASS., 1775-1887. 269 

W. Lincoln, visit of the French guests in Oct. (heliotype of the monu- 
ment in these three) ; 1883, pp. 53 + 1 ; 1881, PP- 42 -|- 1 (two with 
addresses by Hon. R. C. Winthrop); 1885, pp. 47, address by Hon. F. 
W. Lincoln; 1886, pp. 49, address by Hon. Charles Devens; 1887, 
pp. 38 -j- (3), do. All these numbers contain portraits and notices of 
deceased officers, lists of members, annual accounts, and items of 
history. 

MoNUMEXT. Views from (E. N. Moore), pp. 8, 1844. Stranger's Guide, 
a very small pamphlet, editions 1848, 1856, 1859, 1868, and to 1887. 

Bunker Hill Association. D. W. Lincoln's Oration, July 4, 1810, a 
2d ed. with notes by the author. 



TOWN, 1775-1847; CITY, 1847-73; WARDS OF BOSTON", 1873-87. 

^illJrcggejS (see also Churches, Frothingham, Memorials). 
Banks, Hon. N. P. Emancipated Labor in Louisiana. An Address 
delivered at C. Nov. 1, 1864 (also Boston, Oct. 30). 8°. pp. 45. 

n. p., n. d. 
Beecher, Rev. Ed. Faith essential to a Complete Education. An 
Address delivered at the Anniversary of the C. Female Seminary, 
July 31, 1845. S°. pp. 22. Boston, 1815. 

BouTWELL, Geo. S. An Address upon Secession, delivered at C. on the 

eveof Jan. 8, 1861. 8°. pp.30. Ticknor& Fields. Boston, 18QI. 
Langworthy, I. P. (D.D.). A Brief Historical Sketch of the Suffolk 
North Conference of Congregational Churches, 1861-86. 8°. pp. 12. 

Boston, 18S7. 
At its 25th anniversary, Oct. 13, 188G, in the meeting-house of the First 
Church at C, — a member of it. 

To THE Whig Voters of the Fourth Congressional District, Mass., 
advocating the election of Hon. Benj. Thompson, of C. Signed by 
Jas. Dana, Luther V. Bell, John F. Chandler, Chas. L. Wilder. 8°. 
pp.16. n. p., n. d. [1848?] 

^nnexatioit to lio^ton. 

1854. '' Brief Review " (Bib., p. 71) " by a Native of Boston," was by 
W. W. Wheildon. The 5th thousand edition (pp. 16) states that 
the vote in Boston in favor was 3333; against, was 1373; majority 
in favor, 1960. [C. vote was the largest ever yet given there, 2529.] 

•' Candid Review " (do.) and '■'■Fresh Suggestions " (1855, p. 72) were by 
John Quincy Adams Griffin, counsellor, formerly of Groton, then of 
C. An ed. of the latter was issued " Boston, 1854." 

Besides the five articles and Act named, 1854-55 (pp. 71, 72) there 
were, — 



270 A BIBLIOGRAPHY. 



i 



Address to the Citizens of C. before Election Day, Oct. 2. 8°. pp.16 
[1854]. Signed by 141 citizens of C, representing various parties 
and interests, and many well-known men. It was in favor of annex- 
ation, and was written by Hon. Geo. W. Warren. 

Important Considerations. Folio broadside. [Signed by G. Wash- 
ington Warren.] 

Supreme Judicial Court, Middlesex ss., Oct. Terra, 1854. " G. Wash- 
ington Warren, Petition for Mandamus, etc., vs. Mayor and Alder- 
men of the City of C." 4°. pp. 3. Also, "In the matter of the 
Mayor and Aldermen of the City of C. on return of Writ of Man- 
damus. Respondent's Points and Authorities." 4°. pp.8. Same; 
Aldermen's Reply, Oct. 14, 1854. 4°. pp. 4. 

Commonwealth of Mass., Suffolk ss. Writ (Oct. "5, 1854) ordering 
Mayor and Aldermen to certify returns of the votes cast in C on 
annexation (the election was Monday, Oct. 2, 1854), which they 
had " neglected and refused " to do, " intending unlawfully to frus- 
trate and defeat and nullify the provisions of said Act." 

Argument on the County Question, by Judge Warren, pp. 4; also with, 
a letter from Hon. D. M. Fox, Mayor of Philadelphia, pp. 16. 

Boston, 1871. 
|3encDolent InstitutionxJ. 

Free Dispensary. Annual Reports, in S'', the 15th in 1887. — Infant 
School, do., the 18th in 1887, with lists of oflBcers, members, by- 
laws, etc. — Winchester Home, do., the 21st in 1887. All these 
since 1880 were printed by Caleb Rand, C. — C. Young Men's 
Christian Association. Annual Report at the 15th Anniversary, 
April 27, 1884 (first one in pamphlet). 16°. pp. 16. (See News- 
papers and Societies.) 

Charles Rivek Bridge. Report of the Committee on Rules and Reg- 
ulations. Also a list of Subscribers' Names, and of the Directors, 
pp. 14. A Vote on A.ssessments, dated Boston, July 12, 1785. One 
leaf and three blank leaves. 18° size, no title, place, or date [prob- 
ably 1785]. — Report of Committee of the Last Legislature on, with 
Resolves, etc., Apr., 1837. Senate Doc, No. 3. Report dated Jan. 
9th, 1838. 8°. pp. 17. Senate Doc, 22, Jan. 1840, on repairs of 
Warren BruJcje. pp. 4. Do , 53, 1851, on both bridges, and 91, on 
widening draws. Mystic River. House Doc, 2(J8, 1865, Acton C. R. 
and W. bridges. Do., 60, 1867, reports of Draw-tenders, do. Speci- 
fications for Repairing and Repaying C. R. Bridge, for the City of 
Boston, pp. 16. 1875. 

Statement before the R. R. Com. as to the construction of the Boston 
and Maine R. Road Bridge over Charles River, by Jas. Hayward, 
Engineer of that work. pp. 15. Boston, 1849. 



BRIDGES. — CANAL. — LIBRARIES. 271 

Derby, E. H. Abstract of his Argument against the Bill for owners 
of land C. to W. Cambridge, to enter the Fitchburg R. R. with 
tracks, etc. 8°. pp. 7. [1852?] 

Report of Special Commission on New Bridge to Charlestown, City of 
Boston, Doc. 105, (July) 1882. 8°. pp. 6. Two large plates; 
viz., Elevation of proposed elevated Bridge, and Plan of same to- 
gether with that of proposed rebuilding of Warren Bridge, which 
latter plan was carried out in 1883-84. 

Report of the Joint Special Committee on Ncio Charlestown Bridge, 
City of Boston, Doc. 48, (March) 1882. With a Plan. 8°. pp. 3. 

Plans and Estimates for a New Bridge to C, submitted by Wm. H. 
Whitmore of Ward 12. With a Plan. 8°. pp. 3. City of Bos- 
ton, Doc. 14G, (Nov.) 1882. 

Report on Proposition of T. Larkin Turner to construct a Tunnel from 
Boston to C. City of Boston, Doc. 144, (Nov.) 1881. 8°. pp. 3. 

(Jaital, Middlesex (Bib., p. 34). 

Middlesex Canal. Rules, Regulations, and By-Laws, adopted by 

the Proprietors, pp. 19. Boston, 1804 Reports on the Canal 

were made and printed. That of 1809, pp. 8, contains some ac- 
count of it from 1794; of 1810, pp. 14, an interesting one for that 
year, continued in 1811, pp. 15, and 1812, pp. 10, all by J. L. Sulli- 
van, who also wrote Remarks on the importance of Inland Naviga- 
tion from Boston by this Canal, pp. 22, 1813, and Letters in Answer 
to Inquiries about it, pp. 12, Boston, 1818, first published in the B. 
Daily Advertiser. — Report to the Board of Directors, by a Commit- 
tee, April, 1817, pp. 20. [Proposals by the Proprietors of the Locks 
and Canals on Merrimac River, for the Sale of their Mill Power and 
Land at Lowell, pp. 18, Boston, 1826. Report of the Com. on the 
Subject of A New Canal to the same, pp. 20, do., 1840.] 

Catalogues of %ihxAnt$. 

Catalogue of the Charlestown Cii'culating Library (T. M. Baker's), 
No. 24 Main Street. Containing History, Biography, Voyages, 
Travels, Miscellanies, Magazines and Reviews, Novels, Tales, Ro- 
mances, and Plays. Price 12^ cents. 8°. pp. 76, Boston, 1819. 

Charlestown Union Library, 1821-42. Catalogue n. d. 8°. pp. 31. 
(2,500 vols, in 1828.) (Bib., p. 50.) 

Public Library. Catalogue, Rules, etc., 8°, pp. 200, C, 1862; first 

Supplement to Aug. 1, 1863, pp. 12 ; second do., pp. 27, 1865. Cat., 
Oct. 1, 1862, to July 1, 1872, pp. 186, consolidating all Supplements. 
Cat. of the C " Branch " of the Boston Public Library to May, 1880. 
Imp. 8°. pp. 4 + 395. Boston, 1880. (For all these see Bib.) 
Subsequent additions are shown in the Bulletins of the B. P. L. 

Mishawam Literary Association. Catalogue and By-Laws, pp. 24, C, 
1853; do., pp. 46, Boston, 1857. (See Bib., 1858, also.) 



272 A BIBLIOGKAPHY. 

Pkatt, S. B. Catalogue of 100 Bibles, and parts of Bibles, with other 
Sacred Books and MSS. from his library exhibited at Berkeley St. 
Chh., Oct. 4, 1881. 8°, eight leaves printed on one side, tied by 
ribbon. 
Mr. Pratt was for several years a resident of C, and a member of the 1st church. 

Sunday Schools. Catalogues, quite numerous, are generally small 
fugitive tracts. In addition to those in Bib. are. First Church, 18°, 
pp. 16, C, 1881. — Harvard Ch., 1840, 46, 49, 1853, 54, 56, 1870, 
73 (12°, pp. 12). — Winthrop Ch., 16°, pp. 32, 1854. — Universalist 
Ch., 24°, pp. 24, 1849 (Report, pp. 12, 1851). 

Ci)Urcl)Cg. First Church and Parish. 

The Commemoration of the Two Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary 
of the First Church, Charlestown, Mass., November 12, 1882. 8°. 
pp. 60. [For the Contents, and a Historical Sketch, see p. 175.] 
Privately Printed, 1882. 

The Young Men's Christian Association of the First Church and 
Congregation, Charlestown, Mass. Organized Jan. 1, 1852. Con- 
stitution and By-Laws. C. : Rooms, Basement of Church of the 
First Parish, Harvard Hill, 1852. 12°. pp. 24. 

First Parish Mementos, 1632-1886, by Mary D. Balfour. 16°. pp. 13. 
n. p. [Charlestown, 1886]. 

Universalist Church. 

Articles of Faith, Covenant, Form of Government, and Historical 
Sketch. 16° size, pp.12. Boston, 1867. — Catalogue of Library. 
24° size, pp. 24, 1819. — Report of Sab. School, pp. 12, 1851. 
— Fiftieth Anniversary of the S. School, May 11, 1879; prayer, 
poems, historical notes, 1806-79, etc. Sm. 4°. pp. 28. n. p. 

Turner, Rev. E. Minutes of Proceedings, Univ. Convention in Charl- 
ton, Mass., Sep., 1817, signed by him as Moderator. (Also Circular 
Letter by Streeter.) 8°. pp. 8. n. t., p., or d. 

Ballou, Rev. H. Ser. at the Ordination of the Rev. John Samuel 
Thompson as Pastor of the 1st Univ. Soc. in C, Wed,, July 11, 
1827. 8°. pp. 16. Boston, 1827. 

Thompson, Rev. J. S. The Pastoral Care; a Discourse, eve. of his 
Installation, July 11, 1827. 8°. pp. 16, no title. 

St. John's Church. 
By-Laws. 12 Articles. 12° size. pp. 3, no title or date. 
The Convert of Massachusetts. Published by the Parish of St. John's 
Church, Charlestown, Mass. 16°. pp. 172. Wood-cut of the 
church. Gen. Prot. Epis. S. School Union, and Ch. Book Soc. 
N. York, 1860. 
Harvard Church. See Memorials (Walker, p. 276). 
Winthrop Church. (See Bib., 1833-72.) 



i 



DOCUMENTS. — COMPANIES. — CONVENT. — MASONIC. 273 

Articles of Faith and Covenant, with List of Members, 16°, pp. 30, Bos- 
ton, 1849, also Articles (12°?), pp. 8, do., 1866. — Catalogue of 
Present Members, 8°, pp. 10, do., 1881. — Semi-Centennial Manual, 
with Historical Sketch and List of Members, Jan. 9, 18;>3, to Jan. 9, 
1883, (12°?), pp. 77, Boston, 1883. With some copies was bound, 
Rev. A. S. Twornhhj, D.D., Semi-Centennial Discourse, History of 
the Winthrop Church for fifty years, preached Sunday, Jan. 7, 
1883, (12°?), pp. 32, hf. title only [n. p., 1883]. 

The 50tli anniversary of this church was also commemorated, Jan. 9, by a 
social meeting, p. M., and a large public meeting in the evening, when there 
were several addresses. Newspapers contain the printed accounts, some of 
them imperfect. 

(litg pocumcnts. (See Bib. 1847-73.) 

Report of the City Treasurer, pp. 2, and a long folding leaf (100 copies), 
Dec. 22, ISIS. Communication from the Mayor, Dec. 13, 18i8, 
pp. 4. — Municipal Register for 1819, pp. 18. 

CTompantcss. 
Brief Statement of Facts as to the proposed extension of tbe C. 
Branch Rail Road to Fresh Pond. 8°. pp. 8. n. p. or d. 

dontient. See Bib. for many titles. 

A FEW Chapters to Brother Jonathan, concerning " Infallability, &c."; 
or. Strictures on Nathan L. Rice's " Defence of Protestantism," &c., 
&c., &c. By Philemon Scant. 12°. pp.145. Published for the 
Author, Louisville, Ky., 1835. Added is "The Ursulixe Con- 
vent, A Poem," 1835, pp. 34, with a preface by the same author, 
and references to C. in the poem. 

Entry in Bib., p. 58 (from a catalogue), corrected by the author's copy, in 
which is a MS. letter of the Archbishop of Baltimoi'e, who says that the 
author of the "Chapters" was the Rev. Geo. A. M. Elder, President and 
Founder of St. Joseph's College, Bardstown, Ky. 
CoRRY, Peter Mc. Mount Benedict; or The Violated Tomb. A Tale 
of the Charlestown Convent. 16°. pp. x -f- 239. Boston, 1871. 
lEaSOttic. King Solomon's Lodge (chartered, 1783). 

Stillman, Rev. Sam'. Charity Considered, in a Sermon before the 
Society of Freemasons in C, June 24, 1785. pp. 19. 

"120 copies printed for the use of the Lodge [King Solomon's] by Mr. Fleet, 
at sixpence each." (Records, 1867, p. 50; 1885, p. 74.) This pamphlet is 
now so rare that a copy is worth twenty times the original price. 
King Solomon's Lodge, C. By-Laws, Records, List of Members, etc. 
pp. 198. Boston, 1885. An enlarged reissue of the book of 1867, 
with an account of the centennial of the Lodge. 

The Rev. Sam' Parker, June 24, 1788, preached a sermon to the Lodge at 
the meeting-house, when there was an Episcopal service, and a cop)' was asked 
for the press, but the writer has not found it printed. Dr. Bartlett's dis- 

18 



274 A BIBLIOGRAPHY. 

course, 1793 (Bib., p. 34), received a vote of thanks, and a copy was asked 
for publication ; tliis printed work is now very rare. His Oration, 1794 
(Bib., p. 34), at the dedication of the monument on Breed's Hill was a Eulogy 
on Gen. Warren, of which the writer has not found a printed copy. R. W. 
M. Jolin Soley, Jr.'s, address is jmuted with the Records of tlie Lodge (1867, 
pp. 56-57). June 24, 1845, there was a celebration with addresses on placing 
a model of the monument erected by the Lodge in 1794 in the present mon- 
ument ("Freemason's Monthly Mag.," Aug., 1845, and Records of the Lodge 
(ed. 1867), pp. 6.3-70). 

Joseph Warben Commandery, Knights Templars. By-Laws of the, 
revised May, 1880. 16° size. pp. 19. Boston, 1880. 

Monument Council No. 35, Koyal Arcanum. By-Laws of the. 12°. 
pp. 11. Charlealown, 1880. 

JEcl^ean ^jSgltim. See p. 85, and Bibliography, p. 48. 

Wyman, Morrill (M. D.). The Early History of the IMcLean Asylum 
for the Insane. A Criticism of the Report of the Mass. State Board 
of Health for 1877. (Reprinted from Boston Med. and Sur. Journal, 
Dec. 13, 1877.) Portrait of Dr. Rufus Wyman. 5 plans. 8°. 
pp. 15 -f- 1 -j- slip. Cambridge, 1877. 

Oakes, Josiah, Sr. " Four Years wrongfully imprisoned in the IM'^Lean 
Asylum, through an illegal Guardianship." 8°. Boston, 1850. 

l^emorialjS anb ILioejS. (For about eighty others see Bib.) 

Adams, James. Sermon on, Nov. 28, 1880, in the Winthrop Ch., by 
Rev. A. S. Twombly, pastor. 8°. pp. 24. Boston, 1880. 

Baldwin, Loammi. Sketch of his Life and Works, by Geo. L. Vose. 
Heliotype portrait. 8°. pp. 28. (200 copies privately printed.) 

Boston, 1885. 
For an account of the house where he lived in C, .see p. 97, and for his 
works. Bibliography, and Authors lierein. 

Balfour, Walter. Biographical Sketch of, by E. G. Brooks, D.D. 
14 pages in the " Universalist Quarterly" for April, 1875. 

BuRRAGE, A. A. A Genealogical History of the Descendants of John 
Burrage, who settled in Charlestown, Mass., in 1G37. 8°. pp. 265. 

Boston, 1877. 

Chapin, Edwin Hubbell (D.D.). In Memoriam. Services Jan. 2, 
1881, in the First Universalist Ch., C, including a Sermon by Rev. 
Chas. F. Lee, and remarks by Hon. T. T. Sawyer. Portrait, wood- 
cut. 8°. pp.25. Printed by Caleb Rand. Charlestown, 1881. 

Lifeof, by Sumner Ellis, D.D. Portrait. Large 16°. pp.332. Univer- 
sali.st Publi.sliing House, Boston, 1882. — Memoir by the Rev. Anson Titus, 
pp. 13, Boston, 1884 (from the N. E. Hist. Gen. Register, April, 1884). — 
For his family, see The Chapin Genealogy, pp. 367, by 0. Chapin, North- 
ampton, 1866 ; for his Library, see Catalogue, pp. 268, and 4,157 nos. sold 
in New York, April, 1881; and for his works to 1846, see l^ibliograph)'. 
He was minister of the Univ. Ch., C, 1840-46 (b. 1814, d. N. York, Dec. 
26, 1880). No pamphlet memorial of him in N, Y. 



MEMORIALS AND LIVES. 275 

Cheever, Ezekiel, and some of his Descendants. Part II. By J. T. 
Hassam. (Reprinted from N. E. Hist. -Gen. Register, April, 1884.) 
8°. pp. 26. (See Bib., p. 88.) Boston, 1884. 

Curtis, Mrs. M. E. Discourse in Memory of, who d. Feb. 15, 1885, 
in Winthrop Ch., Mch. 15, by the pastor, Rev. A. S. Twombly, D.D. 
16° size. pp. 21. Charlestow7i, 1885. 

Dana. Memoir of the late Hon. Samuel, by his son, James Dana. 
Also of Capt. Luther, and his sons, James F., Sam. L., and Nath. 
G., by Mrs. James Freeman Dana, and Notes of Dr. Sam. L., by 
his friend. Dr. A. A. Hayes. 8°. pp. 46. (Only 50 copies printed 
for private distribution.) Cambridge, 1877. 

Foster, Dea. Gideon. Ser. on his death by Rev. Geo. W. Gardner, in 
the 1st Baptist Ch., C, May 7, 1865. 8°. pp. 18. Boston, 1865. 
Born in Andover, Mass., May 23, 1779 ; came to C. about 1804. 

Frothingham, Hon. Richard (LL. D.). Memoir of, by Charles 
Deane (LL. D.). Portrait, and pp. 17. Reprinted from the Pro- 
ceedings of the Mass. Hist. Soc, Feb., 1885. 8°. Cambridge, 1885. 
A list of the works by Mr. F. contains only one title (Alarm, April 18, 
1775, pp. 12, n. t. ) not given in the Bibliography in 1880. See Authors. 

Harvard, (Rev.) John. Memorial of. The Gift to Harvard Univer- 
sity of Samuel James Bridge. Ceremonies at the Unveiling of the 
Statue, Oct. 14, 1884. AVith an Address by Geo. Ed. Ellis (D.D.). 
Heliotype of the statue, and pp. 19. 8° Cambridge, 1884. 

The Eev. J. H. was minister in Charlestown, 1637-38, and Dr. Ellis was 
pastor of the Harvard Church there 1840-70. The bronze sitting figure 
placed west of Memorial Hall, was designed by Danl C. French, of Concord, 
cast by The Henry-Bonnard Bronze Co., N. Y., and given by S. J. Bridge, 
who was born in Charlestown. 

Hall, Dea. Moses. Speech of the Dead. A Sermon occasioned by the 
death of, delivered in the Universalist Meeting-House in C. on the 
morning of the first Sabbath in Aug., 1826. By Hosea Ballou. 
8°. pp. 15. Boston, 1826. 

Lawrence, Edward. In Memoriam. Discourse by Rev. Chas. F. Lee 
at the Memorial Service, 1st Univ. Ch., C, Nov. 8, 1885, and other 
tributes. 8°. pp. 29. Boston, 1886. 

[Marshall, Mrs. Sophia (Kendal)]. Spirits in Prison: A Discourse 
delivered in Weston, Sep. 24, 1882, on a special occasion, by George 
E. Ellis [D.D.]. Privately printed. With a short Memoir. 8°. 
pp. 27. Cambridge, 1882. 

Pierce, Record of the Posterity of Thomas Pierce, an Early Inhabitant 
of C. , with Wills, Inventories, etc. (F. C. Pierce, Ed.) Worcester, 1882. 

Sketches of the Lives of John L, Sullivan and Thomas Russell. Orig- 
inally prepared for the new American Encyclopaedia, N. Y. By T. 
Russell Sullivan. 16°. pp. 23. Boston, 1861. 



276 A BIBLIOGRAPHY. 

Spkague Family, Memorial of, etc. By Eichard Soule, Jr. (The 
Spragues of C. pp. G4 — US). 12°. pp. xii -f 191, 5 plates. 

Boston, 1817. 
Symmes Memorial. Biography of Rev. Zechariah S., minister of C, 
1631-71, and a Genealogy, etc., of some of his Descendants. By 
John A. Viutou. 8°. pp. (2) -|- xvi -f 181. (Author's portrait.) 

Boston, 1873. 
Stevens, Benj. (D.D.). A Funeral Discourse at the interment of, 
who departed this life May 18, 1791. By Sam! Haven, D.D., Pas- 
tor of the South Church in Portsmouth. 10°. pp. 32. Dover, 1791. 
Son of the Eev, Joseph S., minister of C, who died in C, 1721. 

Thompson, Mrs. Nancy (wife of Hon. Charles T.), A Memorial of. 
[By her Son, Mr. Edwin T.] C, May 6, 1798-Nov. 19, 18S0. 8°. 
pp. 15. [Printed by C. Rand, C, 1881.] 

Walker, Jas., D.D., LL. D. Services at the Dedication of a Mural 
Monument to [erected at the expense of ]\Iiss M. R. Hunt. See 
p. 57], in the Harvard Church in C, in the City of Boston, Jan. 14, 
1883. Ileliotype, and pp. 64. 8°. Cambridge, 1884. 

Warren, Geo. Washington. Class Memoir of, with English and 
American Ancestry. By his classmate, Thos. C. Amory. Together 
with Letters, A'^aledictory Poem, Odes, etc. 8°. pp. 120. Portrait. 

Boston, 1886. 
Judge Warren held almost every office that could he voted to him iu his 
native C, where for over 30 years he was exceptionally prominent. 

Wilder, Sampson Vryling Stoddard. Life. Portrait. 12°. pp. 404. 

New York, 18C5. 
Clerk with Col. Henley (1797-1802); agent of "\Vm. Gray; merchant; 
accounts of C. 
York, !Mrs. Sarah Emily, formerly iMiss S. E. Waldo, missionary to 
Greece. Memoir of. By Mrs. R. B. Medbery. Phillips, Sampson, 
& Co. Boston, 1853. 

Mrs. Y. was h. in C. Nov. 30, 1819, d. in C. Jan. 9, 1851. (Dr. F.) 

IHilitani. 

Prescott Light Guard, Co. A, 1st Reg. Mass. Cavalry. Constitution 
and By-Laws of the. 16° size. pp. 23. Charlestown, 1863. 

Fifth Regiment, M. V. M. History of, by Frank T. Robinson, ex- 
member of Co. H, and A, and Regimental Historian. Fifth M. V. 
M. Headquarters, No. 82 Main Street, C, Mass. 8°. pp. (7) -|- 
237 + (1), 5 plates. Boston, 1879. 

Companies A, D, and H were from Charlestown. 

Thirty-Sixth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers. History of, 1862- 
1865. By a Committee of the Reg. 8°. pp. xiii + 405. 

Boston, 1884. 



NEWSPAPERS. 277 

Co. B was, witli a few exceptions, from C, Of 28 chapters in the ahove, 
5 are by Adj! S. Alonzo Ranlett, 3 by Lt. E. "W. Noyes, and 13 (besides the 
roster and much editorial work) by Maj. Wm. H. Hodgkins, all of C, who 
honorably lielped to hold up the old flag, and represent the Bunker Hill town. 

Thikty-Seooxd Regiment Massachusetts Infantry. The Story of, 
whence it came ; where it went ; what it saw ; and what it did. By 
Col. Francis J. Parker. 16°. pp. xi + 260. Boston, 1880. (Co. 
I was from C.) 

Forty-Seventh Regiment (Co. E, Putnam Blues, from C). No his- 
tory found. 

An Narrative of Events, as they occurred from time to time, in the 
Revolutionary War; with an Account of the Battles of Trenton, 
Trenton-Bridge, and Princeton. By J[oseph] White, who was an 
Orderly Sergeant in the Regt. of Artillery. Published at the ear- 
nest request of many Young Men. Dated C, Oct., 1833. 8° (51 X 
4 in.) pp. 30. Sold at No. 206 Main-Street [corner of Frankhn]. 
This is not "a sketch of his own life" (G. and E., 1017), but of his ser- 
vices May, 1775, to March, 1777. 

The American Recorder, the first, 1785-87, see, p. 18, and Bib., 31. 

The writer's copy of this now rare paper is incomplete, yet it is the only 

one known to him now in C, owned in the family of one who originally 

took it, — it was his grandfather's copy. Complete files are in the libraries 

of the American Antiquarian and Mass. Historical Societies. 

The Toilet : A Weekly Collection of Literary Pieces, principally de- 
signed for the Amusement of the Ladies. Vol. I. No. 1. Satur- 
day, January 17, 1801. Printed by Samuel Etheridge For the 
Editor, 1801. Each 8°. pp. 8. Nos. 1-5 (or more?). 

Franklin Monitor and Charlestown Advertiser. Published every 
Saturday by Bellamy and Green, over the Post-Office, C. $2 per 
annum. 1818. 

Franklin Monitor and Middlesex Republican. Published every 
Saturday evening by Geo. Clark & Co., South side of the Square. 
David Wilson, printer. January, 1820. 

Bunker Hill Sentinel and Middlesex Republican. By Geo. Clark & 
Co. David Wilson, printer. July, 1820. 

The Tickler. Weekly. The second no. of Vol. L was pubhshed 
Saturday, March 25, 1820. pp. 4 (8 x 10, two columns). 1820. 

All the above four papers were probably issued for a short time only ; no 
complete file of either is known to the writer, but he has nos. 1-8, Vol. II. 
of the "Monitor," dated Jan. 1 to March 25, 1820. It was a four-paged 
paper, 11 X 18 inches, and apparently Republican (or as now expressed, 
Democratic) in politics. 

Bunker Hill Aurora, 1827-70. See Bib., pp. 53, 60, 77, and 81 
(Bridges). This was the first permanent paper. 



\ 



278 A BIBLIOGRAPHY. 

Charlestown Chronicle, 1841-44 (Bib., p. 62). — Do. City Adver- 
tiser, 1852-76 (Bib., p. 69), since, and (1887) still continued as the 
C, and then Bunker Hill Times. — Do. Chronicle, 18b8-70 
(Bib., p. 80). — Do. News, 1878, consolidated with the C. Enter- 
prise, Feb. 27, 1886. 

The New Enterprise. Published every Saturday morning by Samuel 
C. Hunt & Co. Vols. I., XL, 1882; HI., IV., 188-3; V., VI., 1884; 
then Charlestown Enterprise and C. News, VII., VIII., 1885; 
IX., nos. 1-8, Jan. 2 to Feb. 20, 1886; then Vol. XVI., no. 9, 
Feb. 27, 1886. (Continued, 1887.) 

Charlestown Tribune. Nov. 13, 1886, to April 30, 1887 (I., no. 25). 
Published by the Tribune Publishing Co., 134 Main Street. 

Weekly Journal of the C. Young Men's Christian Association, 
Dec. 18, 1880, Vol. I., no. 1, each no. 8°, pp. 4, until (?) Nov. 20, 
1886, then sm. 4°, pp. 8 or 4. (Continued, 1887.) 

St. John's Parish Gleaner. Published monthly in the interest of that 
church. 4°. pp. 4. Vol. I., no. 1, Dec. 1885. (Continued, 1887.) 

Miscellaneous. The Amateurs, sundry members at Theatricals in 
Monument Hall by this Co. — Bunker Hill Teller, at B. H. Baptist 
Fair, Nov. 18, 19, 1884. — The Munroe Memorial, for the M. Meth- 
odist Ch., C, 1881. — The News, Dec. 2, 3, " 1985," nos. "48,720, 
48,721;" for [Winthrop] Ch. Fair. — On The Square, Vol. I., 
1881. — The Spice Box, for Fair at St. John's Church. — The Trin- 
ity Bazaar, Dec. 17, 18, 1879, at Fair for that church. 

j^cl)00lj5. (C. Free, Expenses, etc., 1812-22, see Bib., p. 44; Re- 
ports, do., 1825-73.) 

Reports since 1873 are with those of the School Committee of Boston. 
Report, 1838, pp. 4 (not 1835, as in Bib.). 

C. High School. Historical Sketches of it, the Association, and the 
Cadets, together with Lists of Teachers and Pupils, and other mat- 
ters of interest. Published by the Association to Commemorate its 
25th Anniversary. 3 heliotypes. 8°. pp. 106. Boston, 1881. 

Seminary (C. Female). Catalogue. Third annual, with Lists of Offi- 
cers, Teachers, and Pupils. 8°. pp. 12. Boston, 1834. — Plan of, 
and Cat., Oct., 1839, to Oct., 1840. 8°. pp. 16. View of Semi- 
nary. Boston, 1840. — Do. 12°. pp. 12 (no view), do., 1844. 
See Addresses (Beecher), and Bib., 1831-58, and p. 88. 

^ocieticis. 

Washington Fire Society. Instituted at C. Feb. 22, 1800. Con- 
stitution of the. Proesidium Discrimine. 16° size. pp. 13. (See 
p. 65.) C, 1800. — The Same, pp. 12. Printed by Sam. T. Arm- 
strong, Boston, 1811. 

A copy of the latter ed., and two copies of the first, owned by the writer, 
contain in MS. the names, occupations, residences, and removals of members. 



SOCIETIES. — STATE PRISON. 279 

Charlestown Debating Society (ins. Jan. 1, 1829). Constitution and 

By-Laws. With the Names of Members. ltj° size. pp. 14. [See 

Bib., 1839.] C, 1829. 

Young Men's Charitable Association of C. Constitution of the (and 

List of Officers and (142) IMembers). 12° size. pp. 11. Printed at 

the Bunker Hill Aurora Office, 1839. 

Pres't, Benj. Thompson; V. P., Geo. W. Warren ; Treas., Jas. Gould; 

Sec, Jas. Adams. Preamble written by R. Frothingham, Jr. 
Ladies New England Art- Union of Needlework. 9 Bow St., C. 

" Beauties of Sacred Litei'ature. Illustrated by 8 steel engravings. 

Edited by Thos. AVyatt." 8°. pp. viii -|- 220. 1852. Copyright 

by Jas. Munroe & Co., 1848. A work with the above title bears the 

name of the Society as above. 
Naval Library and Institute (formed May 27, 1842). By-Laws, with 

a List of Members, pp. 12. C, 18(J0. — Do., and Annual Re- 
port. 12°, pp. 12 -{- 1. Boston, 1868. 
Charlestown Infant School Soc. Constitution and By-Laws. 16'^ 

size. pp. 7. Printed by Caleb Eand, Charlestown, 1856. — The 

Same, pp. 12, Boston, 1870. (See Bib., 1870, and p. 62 herein.) 
Devens Benevolent Soc. Constitution, Names of Members, etc. 

Charlestown, 1874. — The Same, 12° size, pp, 19, do., 1857. (See 

Bib., 1856, and p. 63 herein.) 
St. Francis de Sales Church Debt Soc, Jan. 1, 1880, to Jan. 1, 1881, 

pp. 32; do., 1883, pp. 30, n. p. Both with Prefaces by the Rev. 

M. J. Supple. (See p. 64.) 
Charlestown Trade and Improvement Association, pp. 16. Boston, 

1881. (Established in 1879. it had a short existence.) 
^tatc f rison. 

Report of the Joint Standing Committee on Prisons, so far as relates 

to the enlargement of the State Prison at Charlestown. Also a 

Minority Report, An Act, Description and Specifications with Plan, 

etc., of the enlargement (2 pi., one of which is a large folding one). 

8°. pp. 36. House Doc, 140, April, 1850. 
State Prisons and the Penitentiary System Vindicated, etc. ; also 

Some Particular Remarks and Documents relating to the Mass. 

State Prison. By an Officer of this establishment at C. [Gam! 

Bradford]. 8°. pp. 63. C, 1821. 
Laws of the Commonwealth for the Government of, etc. , with details of 

the Police and Discipline adopted by the Warden on the completion 

of the New Prison, Oct., 1829. Plan and lithographic view. 8°. 

pp. 112. Press of the B. H. Aurora, C, 1830. 
Moxon ^ffairsi and pommentg. (See Bib., p. 43, and 1819-73.) 
Votes and Memoi'andum of an Agreement at a Town Meeting in C, 

Nov. 22, 1821, and an Adjournment, Monday, Dec. 27, 1824, in 



280 A BIBLIOGRAPHY. 

regard to " the petition of Samuel Tufts and others, now before the 
General Court, for a division of the town" of C, "at the Canal 
Bridge on the Neck." 8^ pp. 4. 

The Trial and Execution, for Petit Treason, of Mark and Phillis, 
Slaves of Capt. John Codman, who murdered their master at 
Charlestown, Mass., in 1755; for which the man was hanged and 
gibbeted, and the woman was burned to death. Including, also, 
some account of other punishments by burning in Massachusetts. 
By Abner Cheney Goodell, Jr. 8°. pp. 39. Cambridge, 1883. 
200 copies. Also in Proceedings of the Mass. Hist Soc, XX. 122-57. 

Documents relative to the Investigation, by Order of the Secretary of 
the Navy, of the Official Conduct of Ainos Binneij, U. S. Navy Agent, 
upon the charges made by Lt. Joel Abbot and others. Published 
by the Accused, 8°. pp. iv + 260. Boston, 1822. 

Minutes of Proceedings of the Court of Inquiry into the Official Con- 
duct of Capt. Isaac Hull, as Commandant of the U. S. Navy Yard 
at C, Aug., 1822. Printed by order of the Navy Dep. from the 
official Ptecord. 8°. pp. 244 + 64. Washington Citij, 1822. 

Trial of Lt. Joel Abbot by the Gen. Naval Court Martial, on U. S. Ship 
Independence, at the Navy Yard, C, Mass., on Allegations made 
against him by Capt. David Porter, and Appendix with Documents 
in relation to the management of Affairs on the Boston Station. 8°. 
pp. 164 + 73. Boston, 1822. — The Same, " printed from the Offi- 
cial Records on file in the Navy Department." 8°. pp. 152. 

Wasliington, 1822. 

Tkix-l oi Capt. John Shaw (Qih.,^.^\). 8°. pp.88. Washington, l%22. 

Harris Family versus J. D. Elliot (U. S. Com. at Navy Yard. 8°. 
pp. 25. 1834 (Bib., p. 88). This case was in regard to land in 
the Navy Yard, about which it introduces considerable historical 
information. 

Trial of Lt. E. B. Babbit on charges preferred by Com. Jesse D. Elliott 
before a Naval Court Martial, Navy Yard, C, Oct. 12, 1834. 8°. 
pp. 120. Boston, 1835. 

Cases of Hamilton Davidson, versus Abel Fitz and Others, Supreme 
Judicial Court, Middlesex, April Term, 1842. Same iu Equity vs. 
Same. And Abel Fitz and Others, versus Hamilton Davidson, Oct. 
Term. 1843. In a Plea of Land. Abstract of Fitz, Wesson, and 
Gary's Title. 8°. pp.52. Printed by Freeman & Bolles. Boston, 
1844. Relating to estates on and near Warren Avenue, with ab- 
stracts of titles from the earliest times. 

Record of Criminal Prosecutions in C, by "a citizen" of C, dated 
Sep. 3, 1847. Lists of fines imposed, March, 1840, to June 14, 
1847, by Wm. Sawyer (J. P.), and of casus before him, Oct. 2, 



PRINTING IN CHARLESTOWN. 1785-183G. 281 

1841, to June 15, 1847. 12°. pp. 44. Addressed To the Citizens of 
C. (no title-page V). 

Proceedings of a General Naval Court Martial, Navy Yard, Boston, 
June 16, 1857, by virtue of an order from the Sec. of the Navy for 
the Trial of Thus. M. Crassen, U. S. N. 8°. pp. 33. Printed by 
C. Rand & Co., 48 Main St., C, 1857. 

Peter Hubbell, in Equity, vs. G. W. Warren, Supreme Judicial 
Court, Middlesex ss., Oct., 1863. '"Twas all about building a 
house upon his own ground" [on Monument Square]. 8°. pp. 4 
_1_ 74 -j_ Points, etc., 13 + Opinion 10 (total, 101). Bill dismissed. 
This report contains many historical items about building on the 
east side of tliis Square. 

Union Sugar Refinery, complainant, vs. Francis 0. Matthiessen, respond- 
ent. In Equity, Circuit Court of the United States, Mass. District. 
Roy. 8°. pp. vii, 5 to 1025. Printed by Alfred Mudge & Son, Bos- 
ton, 1866. 



PRINTING IN CHARLESTOWN, 1785-1836, 

OR FOR FIFTY YEARS AFTER THE PRESS WAS INTRODUCED. 

1785-87. The Ainerican Recorder, the first newspaper (p. 18, and Bib., 
p. 31). _ 1786. JosiahBartlett's Oration. 12°. pp.12. The first 
pamphlet (Bib., p. 32). 
|ol)n f-am^Olt, "at his office near the Bridge." 

The I Works | of the late ] Dr. Benjamin Franklin | Consisting of his | 
Life, \ written by himself. | Together with | Essays, | Humourous, 
Moral, and Literary, | chiefly iu the manner of the | Spectator. | 
Portrait of Dr. F. Small 12°. 2 vols, in 1. pp. 300. The first 
hook? (Bib., p. 37). 1798. 

Universalism Vindicated: | Being the | Substance of some Observa- 
tions I on the I Revelation | of the Unbounded | Love of God, | niade 
to the I Patriarch, in the Field of Padanaram. j Genesis, xxviii. 14. | 
and confirmed by the Joint Suffrages | of the | Prophets and Apos- 
tles. I Delivered some time since to the people who | statedly wor- 
ship the I Only Wise God Our Saviour, 1 in the meeting house in 
Middle Street, | corner of Bennet Street. | By John Murray. | 
Published at the Request of the Congregation. | 3 Texts. 
Charlestown: \ Printed by J. Lamson, for the Author, 1 and 
sold by J. W. Folsom, in Union Street, Boston; ] J. White, in 
Court Street, and at various | other places in town and country. 1 8°. 
Preface, pp. xvi -f Universalism vindicated, pp. 96. No date. 
[Brinley, 6393, gives it 1799.] 



282 PRINTING IN CHARLESTOWN. 17S5-1836. 

Pamphlets. /. Bartlett's Address, Feb. 22, 1797, pp. 12, 1797. —Rev. 
T. Gary, Sermon at C, July 23, 1797, pp. 24 [1797]. —i2. Devens, 
Jr., Discourse at Princeton, N. J., in 1777, pp. 16, 1797. — /. M. 
Russell, Oration, July 4, 1797, at the Request of the Selectmen, 
Artillery Company, and Trustees of the School, pp. 16 (the first 
Fourth of July Oration in C. that was printed), 1797. For these 
four see Bib., p. 86. All the authors were natives of C. 

John Lamson, of Exeter, married, at C, Sally Townsend, of C, Oct. 6, 
1793 (Ch. Kecord), and printed in Exeter. (The writer has by him there, 
Dr. "NVatts's version of the Psalms, 16°, pp. 576, for Thomas and Andrews, 
and David "West, Booksellers, Boston, 1794.) 

•^ ^amucl (0tl)critligc. (Born 1771, d. 1817, says S. E., 3d.) He was at 
9 Newbury Street in 1796, and 22 Marlborough Street, Boston, in 
the summer of 1798. In the next year he came to C, and until 
1805 was the only printer there, his address being " next door to 
Warren Tavern," at the corner of Main and Pleasant streets. He 
then moved to a large building nearly opposite Wood Street (p. 149). 

1799. Devens, R. The Witness of the Spirit, a Discourse to the Stu- 
dents of N. J. College, 1703, pp. 16. (He was then a tutor in the 
Col.). — Harris, Rev. T. M. A Discourse to the Religious Soc. of 
Young Men in Dorchester on the termination of 100 years from the 
time of its establishment, pp. 24. — Morse, Rev. J. Sermon at the 
National Fast, April 25, 1799, with Notes in French and English, 
pp. 50, two wood-cuts, and Address to the Students of Phillips 
Academy, Andover, July 9, 1799, pp. 16. The latter was the one 
minister of C, and the former two were natives of the town. 

1800. A Prayer and Sermon by Rev. J. Morse, C, Dec. 31, 1799, on 
the Death of George Washington, etc., pp. 46 -\- 36, and added, W.'s 
Farewell Address, pp. 21, 1800. Printed at the expense of the 
town. — Bartlett, Hon. J. An Oration on the Death of Gen. Geo. 
Washington, in C, Feb. 22, 1800, at the request of the Selectmen 
and Parish Committee, pp. 15. 

Other Eulogies on Washington. At Dorchester, Feb. 22, 1800, by 
Oliver Everett, Esq., A. M., A. A. S., published at the request of 
the towTi, pp. 22 ; at Old York, Maine, by the Rev. Rosewell Mes- 
singer, pastor colleague of the First Church there, pp. 16 ; at Chel- 
sea, Jan. 14, by the Rev. Phillips Payson, pp. 15; at Dorchester, 
Jan. 7, by the Rev. T. M. Harris, A Fraternal Tribute to the Ma- 
sonic Character of Washington, pp. 15, and by him, Dec. 29, 1799, 
at do., a Discourse. — An Address in Latin by Pres' Joseph Willard, 
and a Discourse in English by David Tappan, Hollis Prof, of Divin- 
ity, before the University in Cambridge, Feb. 21, 1800, pp. 44 (also 
printed in 4°). 

Washington'' s Farewell Address (above), pp. 24, was separately 
issued. Also, Selections from his Correspondence with James 
Anderson, LL. D., pp. 76. 



SAMUEL ETHERIDGE. 283 

Nathl Emmons, D.D. (Franklin, Mass.). A Sermon before the 
Mass. Missionary Soc, Annual Meeting in Boston, May 27, 1800, 
■with an Account of the Soc, etc., pp. 44. — Rev. T. M. Harris. 
The Beauties of Nature Delineated [a 2"^ ed., 1801.] — Hannah 
Moore. Strictures on the Modei'n System of Female Education. 
2 vols, 12°. pp. 146, 13(3. For E. Larkin, No. 47 Cornhill, Boston. 

1801. Rev. T. M. Harris. Discourses | [12] Delivered on Public Occa- 
sions I Illustrating the Principles, Displaying | the Tendency, and 
Vindicating | the Design, | of | Free Masonry. | Engraved frontis- 
piece. 8°. pp. 328. This is the Jirst thick 8° volume printed in 
Charlestown (?). 

An Address by the ministers of the We/tminster AJ/ociation, to the 
Heads of Families in their respective Societies, on the Duty of Fam- 
ily Religion ; ■with several Forms of Prayer annexed. 16°. pp. 76. 
— C. R. Aikin. Concise View, Facts concerning Cow Pox. 3d ed. 
12°. pp. 143. — Wm. Austin. Oration before the Artillery Co., C, 
June 17, 1801. pp. 2^.— Robert Hall, A. M. Modern Infidelity 
considered with respect to its Influence on Society; in a Sermon 
preached at the Baptist Meeting, Cambridge. 8°. pp. 55. Sold 
by S. E., and also by the Booksellei-s in Boston. — Rev. T. M. 
Harris. Beauties of Nature Delineated ; or Philosophical and Pious 
Contemplations on the Works of Nature, and the Seasons of the 
Year. Selected from Sturm's Reflections. 16° size. pp. 237. 
2d ed. Printed and sold by S. E. — The Progress of the Pilgrim 
Good-Intent in Jacobinical Times. 2d American from the 5th Eng- 
lish ed. 12°. pp. 119. — The Toilet: A Weekly Collection of Lit- 
erary Pieces, principally designed for the Amusement of the Ladies. 
No. 1, Jan. 17, 1801. Nos. 12° size. pp. 8. — Rev. Phineas Whit- 
ney. Sermon at Lunenburg, March 4, at the Interment of the Rev. 
Zabdiel Adams, pp. 24. 

1802. An Address to Christians, recommending the distribution of cheap 
Religious Tracts. With an Extract from a Sermon by Bishop 
Porteus before the Yearly Meeting of the Charity Schools, London. 
Charlestown [12°. pp. 24] : Printed and Sold by Samuel Ether- 
IDGE, who keeps conftantly for fale an affortment of cheap Religious 
Tracts, for charitable diftribution. Orders (for ready money) ex- 
ecuted from any part of the United States. — Familiar Instructions 
for Young Children. By a Member of the Church of England. 
12°. pp. 24 [with same imprint and notice as above, but dated 
1803]. — The Real Christian Distinguished from Hypocrites, in a 
Discourse, from Revelations, chap. iii. 1. By Rev. Thomas David- 
son, A. M., minister of Braintree, England. Published in Scotland 
[in 1798] by a Society [instituted July, 1793] for Disseminating Re- 
ligious Tracts [imprint, etc., as above]. 12°. pp. 24. — The same, 
different type, 12°, pp. 24, without the above notice, but with 
" Charlestown : Printed and Sold by Samuel Etheridge, 1802." 



284 PKIXTING IN CHAELESTOWN. 1785-1836. 

On p. 14 of the above Address it is stated that " a Society is about to be 
instituted ; whose object will be to collect, compose, print, and distribute 
small religious tracts," and until its organization "the charitable and pious 
may be furnished at the Bookstore of Mr. Samuel Etheridge of Charlestown, 
on very reasonable terms." Besides this tract (and one below by Davidson) 
the titles of twelve are given on its blue covers, and they seem to be 14 of 
the 19 distributed by the pastor and people of the First Parish, C, to a 
greater extent than by any other persons in N. E. up to that time, 32,600 
copies having been circulated by them (Bib., p. 39). "A Church," and 
"Short Sermons," 1804, seem to have been two more of them. 

The Coquette; or the History of Eliza Wharton: A Novel; 
Founded on Fact. By a Lady of Massachusetts [Hannah Foster, 
wife of Rev. John Foster, of Brighton]. 12°. pp. 262. Printed 
for E. & S. Larkin, No. 47 Cornhill, Boston. 

This once popular novel (first published in 1798 ?) seems to have been the 
first novel, and one of the few, printed in C. 

Carver, Capt. Jon"} Three Years Travels throughout the Interior 
Parts of Noi'th America, for more than .5,000 miles, etc., and an 
Appendix, describing tlie uncultivated parts of America, that are 
the most proper for forming settlements. 4th Am. from the last 
London ed. For West and Greenleaf , No. 56 Cornhill, Boston. 12°. 
pp. xvi + 5 — 312. 

Payson, SelJi. Proofs of the Existence, and Dangerous Tendency, 
of Illuminism; abstracts from Dr. Robison and the Abbe Barruel. 
12°. pp. vi + 5 — 290. Printed for the Author. 
1803. The | HOLY BIBLE | containing the | Old and Nciu Testa- 
ment : I Together with the | Apocrypha : | etc. A second title to 
the New Testament. Large, thick 4°. 7 plates " Engraved by 
James Hill. Charlestown (Massachusetts) : Published by S. Ether- 
idge," 1 plate, " Doolittle, Sc.," and 1 " Engraved by E. G. Grid- 
ley," also a map of Palestine. "Charlestown (INIassachusetts). | 
Printed by and for Samuel Etheridge ; | and for J. White & Co. ; 
Thomas & Andrews; West & Greenleaf; | E. Larkin; and J, West, 
Boston. I 1803." 

In a Preface, dated Sep. 15, 1803, it is stated that "Beside the many 
thousands of Bibles, of several sizes, which are annually imported, many 
large editions have Ijeen printed and sold in the United States within the 
last twelve years. This call for the Bible induced the Editor to undertake 
[this] quarto edition of it." A full account of this ed. is in O'Callagan's 
American Bibles (Albany, 1861, pp. 69, 70). The following, however, 
seems to have been unnoticed : — 

Another, and later, edition (with the plates more worn) was 
issued with the same titlepage, except the addition of "Also, 
Brown's Concordance." This is added, with a tith'page, "A Brief 
Concordance to the Holy Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments: 
Bj which all, or most, of the principal Texts of Scripture may be 



SAMUEL ETHEEIDGE. 285 

easily found out. Revised and Corrected. By John Brown, late 
minister of the Gospel at Haddington, in Scotland. [Text, Acts 
xvii. 11.] Charlestown (Massachusetts): Printed and Sold by 
Samuel Etheridge, 1803." 

The writer has copies of both editions of this Bible, mention of which was, 
by accident, omitted in the Bibliography. 

The Constitution of the Mass. Society for promoting Christian 
Knowledge, pp. 16. — Rev. J. Morse. Mass. Artillery Election 
Sermon, June 6, with notes, pp. 32, and Ser. at the Ordination of 
Rev. Hezekiah May, Marblehead, June 23, pp. 32. — A Friendly 
Visit to the House of Mourning, 4th ed., 24° size, pp. 72, printed 
for the Rev. Jedidiah Morse, D.D. — Familiar Instruction to Young 
Children. By a member of the Church of England. 3d ed. 12°. 
pp. 24. — Lindley Murray. The English Reader; or. Pieces in 
Prose and Poetry ... to assist young Persons to Read with Propri- 
ety and Effect; . . . and to inculcate some of the most important 
principles of Piety and Virtue. 12°. pp. xxii -[- 254 -j- 8- Printed 
for E. Larkin, No. 47 Cornhill, Boston. 

1804. Wm. Austin. Letters [40] from London, 1802-03. 8°. pp.312. 
— A Church of God Described ; the Qualifications for Membership 
stated ; and Christian Fellowship illustrated; in Two Discourses. By 
Joseph Lathrop, D.D., Minister of a Congregational Church in West- 
Springfeld. 3ded. 12°. pp.56. Printed and Sold by S. E. — Rev. 
Levi Frishie. Discourse before the Soc. for Propagating the Gospel 
among the Indians of N. A., Nov. 1, pp. 38. — Mass. Medical So- 
ciety, Constitution, By-Laws, Members, etc., pp. 32. — Rev. J. 
Morse (and Rev. E. Parish). A Compendious History of New 
England designed for Schools and Private Families. Map of N. E. 
by Ashur Adams. 12°. pp. 388. 1st ed., printed and sold by S. E. 
(Bib., p. 40). — Rev. D. Osgood. Two Discourses at Maiden, in 
the beginning of 1804, on " Setting up of a Baptist Society in that 
place." 12°. pp. 83 (two editions in 1804). — The Religious 
Tradesman ; or, Plain and Serious Hints of Advice for the Trades- 
man's i^rudent and pious conduct; from his entrance into business, 
to his leaving it off. 12°. pp. 238, and pp. 2 of advertisements, 
etc. Printed by S. E., and sold by him at the Washington Head 
Bookstore, near the Square in C, 1804. — Shoi-t Sermons designed 
for the Use of those, who have Little Time to read Longer Dis- 
courses (Text). 12°. pp. 24. Printed and Sold by S. E. (Price 
6 cents single, 4 dolls. 50 cents 100.) 

1805. J. Milton. Poetical Works; text of Dr. Newton; Essay by J. 
Aikin. 2 vols., Pocket ed., by S. Etheridge and C. Stebbins. — Rev. 
J. Morse. The True Reasons on which the Election of a Hollis 
Professor of Divinity in Harvard College was opposed, Feb. 14, 
1805. pp. 28. "Printed for the Author," probably by S. E. — 



286 PRINTING IN CHAELESTOWN. 1786-1836. 

Rev. Jul Orion. A Short Exposition of the Old Testament, etc. 
First American from the 2d London ed. 6 vols., thick 8°. pp.428, 
416, 523 (-f 1), 492, 464, 404, or in all, 2,728 pages, or several fold 
the largest work yet printed in the town. Printed and sold by S. E. 
(Vol. VI. is March 1, 1806.) — ^. H. Putnam. Oration July 1, at 
the request of the Federal Republicans of C, pp. 18. (The orator 
was a resident.) — Watts's Psalms and Hymns "in miniature, 
printed on writing paper." — The Westminster Assembly's Shorter 
Catechism. 18° size. pp. 18 (?) Printed and sold by S. E. 

1806. Rev. Tho.'i. Barnard. Discourse, Xov. 6, before the Soc. for Prop- 
agating the Gospel among the Indians and others in N. A. pp. 47. 
— Rev. R. Fleming. The Fulfilling of the Scriptures delineated. — 
Mrs. Eliz^ Rowe. Devout Exercises, edited by Dr. I. AVatts. Sm. 
18°. pp. 189. — State Prison, account of, with a Plan, Rules, etc. 
(Bib., p. 41). pp. 48. 

1807. Rev. Mr. Corbel. Self Employment in Secret, pp. 96. 4| X 
2^ inches. — A Correct Statement of the Controversy between T. O. 
Self ridge and B. Austin. Plan. pp. 52. — Rev. P. Doddridge. 
Family Expositor. 6 vols., 8°, a work similar in size to the Orton, 
1805. — Walter Scott, Esq. The Lay of the Last Minstrel, a Poem. 
16°. pp. 252. Published by Etheridge and Bliss, No. 12 Cornhill, 
Boston. Sold also [as well as printed] by said E. in C. The Lay 
was published at Edinburgh in 1805. (See Falconer, below.) — 
''Mr. Rollin." Ancient History. 12th ed. 8 vols. 8°. Vol. I. 
(with map and portrait), 1807, published and sold by Etheridge 
and Bliss, 12 Cornhill, and by said Etheridge, Washington Head, 
C. Vol. VIII. is 1809, C. Mass., printed by Hastings, Etheridge, 
and Bliss, and pub. and sold by them, 8 State St., Boston. 

1808. Rev. J. Allcin. An Alarm to Unconverted Sinners. — Rev. J. 
Scott. Discourse, March 9, 1807, at the Funeral of Rev. S. Fox- 
croft, New Gloucester. 8°. pp. 44. 

Rev. JFm. CoZZicr, Evangelicana ; or Gospel Treasury (Bib., p. 42), 4 vols., 
12°; and Rev. James Saurin, Eleven Sermons on Various Important Sub- 
jects, 12°, pp. xii 4- 279 + (1), were pub<> by H. E. and B. (see 1807), and 
S. Etheridge, C, 1808. On the last page of the last-named work the same 
publishers announce that they are publishing by subscription "Select Mis- 
cellaneous Classics," in 60 vols., 12°, "to be ornamented with Plates, en- 
graved by the first American Artists, comprising tlie entire works of Pope, 
Sivift, Smollet, Addison, Goldsmith, Johnson, Sterne, and Fielding." Price, 
$1 per vol., and if hot pressed, $1.25. The writer does not know to what 
extent these books were issued. Like nearly all those mentioned in this list 
of works printed in C., they have become very scarce. Rev. J. Chickering's 
Dedication Sermon, "Woburn, June 28, was printed by H. E. & B., Boston, 
1809, as were several works. S. J. Armstrong (1809) and J. Howe (1806) 
had appeared as competitors in C., and S. E., Sr., seems to have ceased work 
there and to have been succeeded by his son, Samuel, Jr. Without date is 
the following : — 



GREENOUGH. — HOWE. — ARMSTRONG. 287 

*■ 
Langley, B. and T. The Builder's Jewel; or the Youth's Instructor, 
and Workman's Remembrancer, . . . explaining Drawmg and Work- 
ing [in the five Orders, Carpentry, etc.], " The whole illustrated by 
upwards of 200 Examples, engraved on 100 Copper Plates." 1st 
American ed. Sm. 4°. pp. 46 -(- 100 leaves of plates. C. : Printed 
by S. Etheridge for Samuel Hall, Engraver, No. 2 Cornhill, Boston, 
It contains details of the classic orders, good models for framing 
roofs, and examples of windows, etc., in debased Italian. 

1802. Win. Falconer. The Shipwreck. A Poem. The ninth edition, 
corrected. 1G°. pp. 115. Printed for the Booksellers by Wm. 
Greenough, C, 1802. 

The writer's copy bears in MS. the name of Emily Etheridge. The printer 
may have worked in S. E. 's office, and this book may have been the begin- 
ning o/ several reprints of English poems in C. 

^onatl);ttt "^Otx»e. Born in New Ipswich, N. H.; Deacon in the Bap- 
tist Church; died July 19, 1856. 
1806. Rev. /. Morse. Sermon on Miss Mary Russell, who died July 24, 
1806. pp. 18. n. p., 1806. — 1807. Archibald Bonar. Genuine 
Religion, the Best Friend of the People. 12''. pp. 48. — 1808. 
The Great Question answered, etc., with the Sentiments of Fenelon. 
— 1810. Rev. W. Balfour. Some Observations on Searching the 
Scriptures. 12^ size. pp. 72. — 1813. Rev. W. Balfour. Support 
of Religious Teachers considered. 8°. pp. 96. — 1814. Rev. E. 
Turner. Two Discourses, May 22, at Salem. 8°. pp. 24. — 1815. 
Do. Thanksgiving Sermon, April 13, for the Return of Peace. 8°. 
pp. 23. — 1818. Do. Discourse, Thanksgiving Day, Dec. 3. pp. 12. 
— 1822. Do. Discourse at Roxbury, Jan. 4. 8°. pp. 15. — [1823. 
Do. A Discourse at the Universalist Meeting House in C, Feb. 23. 
pp. 16. Printed in Boston, whither Mr. Howe removed his business, 
in which he became a veteran.] 

^amucl S. ^rmjstrong. 

1809. Rev. Noah Worcester (of Thornton). Solemn Reasons for declin- 
ing to adopt the Baptist Theory and Practise : in a Series of Letters 
to a Baptist minister. 2d ed. 12°. pp.39. — B.Gleason. Oration 
at C, July 5. — Rev. Wm. Collier. Evangelicana. 4 vols, (see 
Etheridge, 1809). — A Child^s Memorial : Containing an Account of 
the early piety and happy death of Miss Dinah Doudney, of Portsea, 
Aged 9 Years, Delivered to a Congregation of Children, in Orange 
Street Chapel, on New Year's Day, 1805. To which is added, an 
Account of Miss Sarah Barrow, who was burnt to death, April the 
4th, 1805. 1st American from the 7th English edition. By John 
Griffin. 16°. pp. 54. Printed for Rev. Daniel Oliver. — Sam\ 
Thompson. Universal Restoration Vindicated. Reply to Rev. Jacob 
Norton, pp. 32. 



288 PRINTING IN CHAELESTOWN. 1785-1836. 

1810. Hymm, composed by different authors, at the request of the Gen- 
eral Convention of Universahsts of the N. E. States and others. 
2d ed. Printed for the Committee, and sold by A. Brown and W. 
Hovey, C. 12°, pp. 3G0. — The Poetical Works of Doctors Smol- 
lett, Johnson, and Goldsmith, in 1 vol., sm. l:j°; Smollett, pp. (4), 
101 ; Johnson, with an Account of the Author's Life, pp (4), 133; 
Goldsmith, do., pp. (4, and 4 blank), 102. I'rinted for Asahel 
Brown. — Rev. ./. Morse. Signs of the Times. Ser. at Boston, 
Nov. 1, before the Soc. for Propagating the Gospel among the Indi- 
ans and others, pp. 72. 

1811. Richard Baxter. The Saint's Everlasting Rest, abridged by Benj. 
Fawcett. 12°. pp. 319. — Rev. Wm. Collier. The Evangelical 
Instructor. 12°. — Rev. E. Smith (Hopkinton, N. II.). A Disser- 
tation on the Prophecies. — [/.'jaac Watts, D.D. The Terms of 
Christian Communion. 1st American ed. Sm. 12°. pp. 172. 
Printed and sold by S. T. A., No. 50 Coruhill, Boston. With a list, 
pp. 8, of 22 books lately from his presses there.] 

Mr. Armstrong printed in the second story of the brick building on Main 
St. nearly opposite Union St. (see p. 143). Oct. 1, 1812, he married Abi- 
gail, daughter of Timothy Walker, of C. Subsequently he became Lt.- 
Gov. of Mass., a prominent and wealthy man, and lived on the slope of 
Beacon Street. The writer was kindly enabled to examine the Ubrary that 
he left, but found extremely little there relating to C. 

1811. The Pious Mother: or. Evidences for Heaven. Written in the 
year 1650. By Mrs. Thomasen Head, for the Benefit of Her Chil- 
dren. Published from the original MS. by James Franks, A. M., 
and Curate of Halifax. 12°. pp. 39. 

On the back of the title is an Address by " The Trustees of Philips [sic] 
Academy" who "have caused a new edition of" the work to be printed for 
gratuitous circulation. 

Rev. Dr. Edward Young. Works of, revised and corrected by 
himself. 1st Am. ed. 3 vols., 12°. pp. 288, 288, 300 -f- 9. Pub- 
lished by C. W. S. and H. Spear. [In a list of 2G2 subscribers only 
7 are in C, Mass.] — 1812. Ahner Kneeland {Vnvf.C\i., C). Child's 
Scriptural Catechism, pp. 36 -|- 4. Printed for the author, with a 
List of Books sold by him. 

Solomon ^. lircga. 

1812. The Freeman's Guide; containing the Federal Constitution, and 
the Constitutions of the Different States of the U. S. A. ; with the 
latest amendments; also the Declaration of Independence, and 
AVashington's Farewell Address. 12°. pp. 294. Printed and pub- 
lished by S. B. B. 

Hanjs ILunt). 

1812. Gen. Geo. Washington's Farewell Address to the Citizens of the 



SAMUEL ETHERIDGE, JR. 289 

U. S. A. 8°. pp. 8, very small type. " Printed and sold by Hans 
Lund," and another title printed by him, and "Sold by Charles 
Williams, Boston." 

Note. — The writer has been unable to obtain information about these 
last four printers. 

^amucl (l^tljcriilgc, |r. (Died in C, Nov. 23, 1847, aged 56.) 

1810. Dr. Sam{ Johnson. The Lives of the most eminent English Poets; 
■with critical observations on their Works. 2 vols., 8°. pp. 432 + 
pp. 2 of advertisements, and 448. — J. L. Mosheim. Ecclesiastical 
History, Ancient and Modern, translated from Latin by A. Maclaine, 
D.D. 8°. 6 vols., pp. XV -j- 420 (2); 571 (2); (2) 456 (2); (2) 
510; (2) 496 (2) ; (2) 418, or in all 2,902 pages; vol. iii. and others, 
1811. This, the largest loork ijet printed in the town (see Orton, S. E., 
1805) was published by subscription by S. E., Jr. — Wm. Newcome. 
Our Lord's Conduct as a Divine Instructor, pp. 12 + 516. 

1812. J. Evarts. Oration at C, July 4. pp. 32. —Rev. /. Morse. A 
Sermon at C, State Fast at Declaration of War with Great Britain. 
In Two Parts, pp. 32. — Aug. Calmet. Great Dictionary of the 
Holy Bible, Taylor's ed. 4 vols. , 4°. 176 plates and 6 maps (1812- 
14). The largest andjinest work from the press in C, published at 
$9 a volume (see Bib. p. 91). — D. Ramsay. Life of Martha Lau- 
rens Ramsay (d. Charleston, S. C, June 10, 1811). 2d ed. 16°. 
pp. 266 + 4. 

1813. Hon. J. Bartlett. Address, C, Feb. 22 (Bib., p. 44). pp. 15.— 
New Testament (4^ X 2f inches). — Thoma.<s Keid, D.D., F. R. S., 
Works, with an Account of his life and writings by Dugald Stewart, 
and notes by the American editors. 4 vols., 8°. pp, vii -(- 3 — 444; 
XV + 462 (ii) (1814); 406 + viii (1815); 429 -f xxv (1815).— 
Walter Scott, Esci. Rokeby; a Poem. 24°. pp. 180 + 83. Pub- 
lished by S. E., Jr. — Rules and Regulations for the Army of the 
U. S. 12°. pp. 48. 

1814. J. Morse, D.D. An Appeal to the Public, on the Controversy 
respecting the Revolution in Harvard College, etc. 8°. pp. xii -j- 
5 — 190 + (2). C. : " Printed for the Author " (by S. E., Jr.?). — 
Jos. Tufts, Jr.. Oration, July 4, at C. pp. 16 (Bib., p. 46). 

1816. G. Bradford. Description of the Mass. State Prison. 8°. pp. 
33 -}- 2 sheets of Statistics (Bib., p. 47). — Sermons, Addresses, and 
Letters selected from the Writings of the late Rev. Isaac Stockton 
Keith, D.D. (Independent Congregational Church, Charleston, S.C.), 
Memoir, etc. 8°. pp. 448. (See p. 300.) 

1817. Rev. H. Ware. Sermon at the Interment of Rev. Tlios. Prentiss, 
pp. 16 (Bib., p. 4:8). — Edward Wells, D.D. Sacred Geography, 
etc., revised, published under direction of the Editor of Calmet's 
Dictionary (5th vol., see S. E., Jr., 1812, and Bib., p. 91). 4°. 



pp. 496, 31 plates, 12 maps. 



19 



290 PRINTING IN CHAELESTOWN. 1785-1836. 

1818. J. Ryland, D.D. The "Work of Faith, the Labour of Love, and 
the Patience of Hope, illustrated; in the Life and Death of Rev. 
Andrew Fuller (Baptist Ch., Kettering, Eng.) 12°. pp. xii + 326 
-\- (2). Copyright to Wm. Collier. 

1819. /. Morse, D.D. The American Universal Geography. 7th ed. 
2 vols., 8°. pp. iv + 9 — 898 + (2), and (2) + 13 — 859, 5 maps, 
and an Atlas of the World. 4°, with 63 maps by Arrowsmith and 
Lewis (issued also with the earlier editions). — The Christian Ora- 
tor; or a Collection of Speeches before Religious Benevolent Soci- 
eties. 3d ed. 18°. pp. 298. Three editions were "printed in 
about 15 months." — Extracts from the Minutes of the Gen. Asso- 
ciation and Domestic Missionary Soc. of Mass. Proper, assembled 
at Pittsfield, June 22, 1819. 8°. pp. 34. 

1820. /. Morse, D.D., and E. Parish, D.D. A Compendious History of 
N. E., to which is added, a short abstract of the History of N. York 
and N. Jersey. 3d ed., Enlarged and Improved. 12°. pp. 324. 
(Bib., p. 40, and S. E., 1804, above.) "The net profits of which, 
and of all future editions, are consecrated by the propi'ietor of the 
work, to the aid of pious young men of good talents, in obtaining 
an education for the ministry." 

1821. ^^ State Prisons and the Penitentiary System Vindicated," etc., also 
remarks and documents relating to the Mass. S. P. " By an Officer 
of this Establishment" at C. 8°. pp. 63. — Aiinual Report {5th) 
of the Boston Soc. for the Religious and Moral Instruction of the 
Poor, Oct. 17. 8°. pp. 32. (On p. 4 of the cover S. E. announces 
(Dec. 3) in press. Illustrations of Scripture, 3 vols., 4°, 234 engrav- 
ings, to be in 30 nos. at SI each to subscribers.) 

2. £SLc ^OtDtt. 

1815. Cotton Mather, D.D., F. R. S. The Christian Philosopher; a 
Collection of the Best Discoveries in Nature with Religious Improve- 
ments. The style made easy and familiar. 16°. pp. 324. Copy- 
right to Wm. Collier. Published at the Middlesex Bookstore (Aug.). 

ST. Circm, and ^cllantji ^ 6recn. 

1818. The Franklin Monitor, a newspaper (see p. 277). — 1819. B, 
Gleason. Oration at C, July 5. pp. 16. Printed and published 
by T. Green. — Rev. E. Turner. (2) Discourses on Doctrinal and 
Practical Subjects, pp. 25, and Discourse, Fast Day, April 1, 1819, 
pp. 13; also a School Report, a Broadside; all by these printers. 

1820. Rev. J. Walker. A Sermon, March 6, on the Death of Miss 
Mercy Tufts, who died Feb. 12, 1820, aged 22. 8°. pp. 8. 

This extremely rare tract (the writer's copy the only one known to him) 
is said to relate to an intimate friend of the preacher, and was probably 
printed by one of what were called the Winter-Hill Tuftses, a piiuter. 



WILSON. — CLARK. — BADGER. — DAVIDSON, ETC. 291 

PaDib WiU&on. 

1820. First Church. Sermon, Charge, etc., Feb. 23, at the Installation 
of the Rev. Warren Fay. 8°. pp. 41 (Bib., p. 49). Tublished by 
G. Clark & Co. — Town Repoi-ts, Expenses, and Schools, two Broad- 
sides. — The Middlesex Republican (Jan.), and the B. H. Sentinel 
(July), two newspapers (see p. 277). 

Cgeo. (Sladi & €o. (Booksellers). 
1820. The Hieroghjphick Bible, etc., 3d ed., woodcuts, 12°, pp. 144, pub- 
lished by Joseph Avery, Plymouth, printed at Geo. Clark & Co.'s 
office, C. 2, [New Town-House, C. Square]. They published the 
two newspapers printed by D. Wilson, also the following book. 

S;i)oma!S l^abgcr, ^r. 

1820. M. Waddell, D.D. (Abbeville, S. C). Memoirs of Miss Caroline 

E. Smelt, who died Sep. 24, 1817, at Augusta, Ga. 3d ed. from the 

2d N. York ed. 12°. pp. 180. 
Note. —From 1820 to 1821 the printing business in C. seems to have been small 

and poor. 

C^COrgc paniDSon (says Mr. Stowell, born 1798, d. 1845, gr. son of Alex- 
ander D., of Aberdeen, Scotland, and successor of S. Etheridge, and 
printed at 13, p. 120). 
1824. Rev. W. Balfour. An Inquiry into the Scriptural Import of the 
Words, Sheol, Hades, Tartarus, and Gehenna; all translated Hell 
in the Common English Version. 8°. pp. 8 -|- 418. — Do. 2d ed., 
12°. pp. 348 (1824). — Thos. Paine. Political Writings. 2 vols. 
— 1825-27. Town Reports. (Most of the local matter, 1821-27, 
was printed in Boston.) — 1828. Rev. W. Balfour. Letter to Dr. 
Allen, pp. 72, and Three Essays on the Immortality of the Soul, the 
Intermediate State of the Dead, and a Future Retribution. 12°. 
pp. 3G0. (Also, 1829?) — 1829. Warren Ins. for Savings, Plan, 
By-Laws, etc. 12°. pp. 12. — Town Reports. — The Laivyer, or 
Man as he ought not to be. A Tale. 12°. pp. 180. (Worked in 
C, in 1835. See p. 300.) 

5HilUam Wi. SfiSI)cilbon (born in Boston, Oct. 17, 1805; came to C. 
1827; now (1887) of Concord). 
1827. Bunker Hill Aurora, No. 1, July 12 (continued until Sep. 24, 1870, 
see Bib., pp. 53, 60). -^ 1828. Edward Everett. Oration at C, 
July 4, 1828. pp. 43, C, Wheildou and Raymond. — 1830. Do. 
Address, June 28, 1830, Anniversary of the Arrival of Gov. Win- 
tbrop, delivered and pub. at the request of C. Lyceum, pp. 51. — E. 
Phinney. Address, Oct. 7, before Middlesex Soc. of Husbandmen 
and Manufacturers, pp. 28. C, both by W. W. W.; and Laws, 
etc., of the State Prison (Plan and litho. view), pp. 112. C, Press 
of the B. H. A. — 1831. T. G. Fessenden. Address, C, Jan. 31. 
pp. 46 ; and A General Circular to all persons of good character who 



292 AUTHORS. 

■wish to emigrate to the Oregon Territory. By order of the Am. 
Soc. for encouraging its settlement, instituted Boston, 1829. pp. 
28. (Of which W. W. W. was an agent.) — 1832. Wm. Sumner. 
Address, C, Nov. 23, 1831; and Proceedings against Mrs. Emily 
Richardson. 2d ed., pp. 38. — 1833. Proceedings of tlie Grand 
Lodge of iNIass. pp. 20. — 1834. Eulogy on Lafayette, Masonic 
Temple, Oct. 9. by Francis Baylies; also School Report. — 1835. 
E. Everett. Address at Lexington, April 19. pp. 36 (also pp. 66). 
— 1836. By-Laws, C. Wharf Co., 12°, pp. 29, and oi Engine Co. 
No. 4, 16°, pp. 8. For works by Mr. Wheildon (author) see Bib., 
and p. 300 herein. 



SiMOX RoDEXBURG published (no printer's name) "La Henriade Poeme, 
par Voltaire." Edited by Prof. C. L. Parmentier, N. York. 16°. 
pp. 171. This is the only volume the writer has seen following one 
by the same publisher beginning a series of works by eminent French 
authors, — " Paul et Yirginie," par J. H. B. de St. Pierre. 16°. pp. 
163. Both 1836. 

In the Bibliography (p. 92) the writer stated that the productions of 
the press in the town after 1836 were for many years occasional pam- 
phlets, and the B. H. Aurora. In later years there were other news- 
papers (see p. 278), and Mr. Caleb Rand printed several handsome 
volumes. Meanwhile, for a considerable period, the productions were 
so small that there does not appear reason for giving them. Those 
that relate to the town are mentioned in the Bibliography (1880). 

AUTHORS. 

Natives or Residents, including all those mentioned in the Bibliography 
(except those who prepared reports or made single addresses), together 
with corrections and additions : — 

Abbot, Rev. Hull. Seep. 265, and Bibliography, 1735-53. — Allex, 
Rev. Thos., p. 262, and Bib., 1659. — Austix, A. W., James W., 
and W. (natives) ; see Bib. 

Badger, Rev. Stephen (a native, p. 136). See p. 265, and Bib., 1774. 

Baldwix, Loammi. Report on introducing Pure Water into the City 
of Boston. 8°. pp. 78, dated C, Oct. 1,1831. Boston,lSU. Sec- 
ond ed., 3 folding maps, and Appendix. 8°. pp. 143, do., 1835. — 
Second Report to a Committee of the Boston Aqueduct Corporation, 
dated C, Jan. 19, 1835. 8°. pp. 12. Boston, 1835. — See p. 274, 
and Bib., 1834. 

Balfour, Rev. W. Letters to Rev. Moses Stuart, etc. (Universalist 
Mag., 1820-21), July 29, 1833. 16°. pp. 126. Boston, 1833.— 
See p. 274, and Bib., 1810-36. 



AIJTHOKS. 



293 



Barker, Prof. Geo. F. (a nath-e). A Text-book of Elementary Chemis- 
try, 'theoretical and inorganic. The 11th ed. was 12^ pp. vi + 342, 
illustrated. iVeiw Hami, 1874. —The Forces of Nature. Address 
before the Chemical Soc. of Union College, July 22, 1863. 8°. 
pp. 45. Albamj, 18G3. The author is distinguished in science, and 
is a Commander in the Legion of Honor, France. 
Bartlett, Hon. J. (M. D.) (a nalwe). Index, and Bib., 1786-1815. 
BowEN, Francis (a native, 1811, long Alford Professor, Harvard Coll.; 
Col. A., the founder, was of C). Critical Essays on the History 
and present Condition of Speculative Philosophy. 12°. 1842. — 
Lowell Lectures : Application of Metaphysical and Ethical Science 
to the Evidences of Religion. 8°, 1849 ; 12^ 1855. - Principles of 
Political Economy applied to the American people. 8°, 18o6. All 
Bosto7i. — Documents on the Constitution of England and America. 
8°. Cambridge, 1854. — Treatise on Logic. 12°., do., 1864.— 
Gleanings from a literary Life, 1838-80. 8°. N. York, 1880. - A 
Layman's study of the English Bible considered in its literary and 
secular aspect. 8°. N. York, 1886. - Tn Sparks's Amer. Biog., 
Life of SirW. Phips (vii., 1837); Steuben (ix., 1838); Jas. Otis 
(xii., 1844). — Articles in N. A. Review, Proc. Am. Acad. Arts 
and Sciences, etc. 
Bradford, G. See Bib. (State Prison), 1816.-Bradstreet, Anne, 
do p 1. — Rev. Simon, do., 1755.— Brown, Thomas (a native). 
See'p 265. -[Rev. Joseph (in C, 1673-77), date corrected, Bib., 
p. 95.] -BuDiNGTON, Rev. W. L (D.D.). See Index, and Bib., 
1842-80. 
Caldicott, Rev. T. F. See Bibliography, 1853. 
Cartee C. S. (M. D.). Questions adapted to the test of the New 
Testament, designed for Sunday Schools. 16°. Boston, 1845-46. 
-Questions adapted to the text of the Pentateuch, designed for 
Bible Classes and Sunday Schools. 16°, do., 1851. -Elements of 
Physical and Political Geography, designed as a text-book for 
Schools and Academies. 12°, do., 1855. - Elements of Map-draw- 
ing ; with plans for sketching maps by triangulation. Designed f or^ 
do., do., 1859. —Jesus and his Questioners. A Series of Sunday 
School Lessons drawn from the various inquiries found in the Gos- 
pels. 16°, do., 1868. The author was for many years a teacher in 
private and public schools, and Ubrarian of the Public Library. 
Gary, Rev. Thos. (a native). See Bib., 1768-1808. - Chapin, Rev. 
E H (D.D.). See p. 274, and Bib., 1841-46. — Cheever, E. 
See Bib., 1709, etc-CoBUim. E. N., do., ISJi. - Collier. 
Rev W., do., 1806-19 (also Index herein). — Crosby, Rev. D., 
do., 1834-43. — Cutler, Rev. Timothy (D.D.) (a native, H. C. 
1701), do., 1717-47. —Cutter, A. E., do., p. 1, and 1852-74. 



294 AUTHORS. 

Dana, Hon. J. See p. 275, and Bib., 1858-60. 

Devens, Hon. Charles (a native, born corner of Union and Lawrence 
sts. ; distinguished in many high positions, — General, Judge, At- 
torney-Gen. of the U. S., President B. H. M. Ass'n). Address at 
Faneuil Hall, July 27, 1885, printed in A Memorial of Ulysses S. 
Grant by the City of Boston, pp. 50-60, also a Commemorative Ad- 
dress on Gen. Grant, at Worcester, Aug. 8, 1885. — A Sketch of 
the Civil War, a lecture at the Lowell Institute, INIarch, 1886 (in 
newspapers). — Address commemorative of the 15th Reg. Mass., at 
the Dedication of a Monument at Gettysburg, June, 1886, printed 
by the Regiment (of which he was commander) . — Opening Address 
at the Celebration of the 250th Anniversary of Harvard College, as 
President of the Association of the Alumni (see the Memorial Vol.). 
— See also Proc. Mass. Hist. Soc, Memoir of Gov. Bullock, etc.; 
also B. H. M. Ass'n, p. 269 herein. Addresses as President, 1885-87; 
also Bib., p. 86. 

Devens, Samuel Adams (Rev.) (a native; H. C, 1829). "Sketches of 
Martha's Vineyard, and other Reminiscences of Travel at Home, etc. 
By an Inexperienced Clergyman." 12''. pp. viii -[- 208. Jas. 
Munroe & Co. Boston, 1838. 

Devens, Rev. Richard Miller (a native) . Commercial and Business 
Cyclopaedia. 2 vols. D. Appleton & Co., N. York, and Triibner 
& Co., London, 1861. — Incidents of the War of the Rebellion. 
Hartford (Conn.) Publishing Co., 1866. [Both pub'd under the 
name of " Fazerkirkland," and by subscription, as also was the 
following.] 

Our First Century, being a Popular Descriptive Portraiture of the 
One Hundred Great and Memorable Events of perpetual interest in 
the History of our Country, etc. 700 woodcuts. Imp. 8°. pp. 1004. 
Published by C. A. Kichols & Co., Springfield, Mass., and Hugh 
Heron, Chicago, 111., 1870, 1879, etc. 

The author was the son of Samuel Devens, who, with his family, was long 
at the First Church. Of the first-named work the sale has been about 
10,000 copies ; of the next, 40,000 ; and of the last, a very large volume, 
190,000, probably very far beyond the sale of any other one work by a 
Charlestown author; beyond even that of any one of the Geographies by 
the Morse family. The issue of the "First Century" would in bulk and 
weight have made a fair cargo for an old Liverpool "liner." 

Devens, Richard (a native). See p. 205, and Bib., 1795-97. 

Dillingham, Rev. Pitt. See Index, and Bib., 1880. 

Edes, H. H. (a native). Bibliographies of Rev. J. Walker, pp. 9, and 
Rev. G. E. Ellis, pp. 11, from Hist. Harvard Ch. (Bib., 1879).— 
Historical Sketch of Charlestown, in the Memorial History of Bos- 
ton (1880). 



AUTHORS. 295 

Ellis, Rev. Geo. E. (D.D.). See Bib., 1840-69. — John H., do., p. 1. 

EvARTS, J. See Index, and Bib., 1812, 1831, 1845, and p. 96. 

Everett, Hon. E. See Index, and Bib., 1826-30, 1859, 1865, and 
p. 96. — Rev. L. S., do., 1831. —Rev. O. C, do., 1851-73. 

Fat, Rev. W. (D.D.). See Index, and Bib., 1820-35. 

FoRSTER, E. J. (M. D.) (a native). The Cause and Treatment of 
Mange in the Dog. pp. 10. Chicago, 1881. — The Necessity of 
using the Long Nozzle, etc. pp. 8. Improved and new Powder 
Insufflators, pp. 4, both Cambridge, 1881. — Premature Birth (from 
Boston Med. and Sur. Journal, Mch. 19, 1885). pp. 5. 

FowLE, D. (a native). See p. 265, and Bibliography, 1755. 

Frothingham, Hon. R. (a. native). Preamble to the Constitution of 
the Young Men's Charitable Association, 1839. — " Being Dead he 
yet speaketh. An Address delivered before the Sunday School at- 
tached to the C. Universalist Soc. on the Sabbath succeeding the 
interment of its late Pastor, Rev. Thos. F. King." (Mr. F, -was 
then Superintendent of the S. S.) Pub'd by the Univ. and Ladies 
Repository, Mch. 15, 1840, Boston. — Address, May 3, 1852, to 
Louis Kossuth at Bunker Hill. Pub? in "Kossuth in New Eng- 
land." 8°. Boston, 1852. pp. 130-31. — The Alarm on the Night 
of April 18, 1775. 8°. pp. 12, n. t. (A letter to the Mayor and 
Council of Boston, dated Boston, Dec. 28, 1876, pi-inted but not 
published). — See p. 275, and Bib., 1840-74. — C. W., do., 1854-55. 

Gardner, Rev. C. See Bib., 1827. —Rev. G. W., do., 1862. — Good- 
win, Mrs. H. B., do., 1863-68. — Goose, Elizabeth (a native), do., 
1719. — Greenleaf, Rev. P., do., 1843. — Grinnell, Rev. C. E., 
do., 1869-74. — Gunnison, E. N. (a native), do., 1880. 

[Griffin, J. Q. A.] A Portrait of Benj. F. Butler, by a House Painter. 
8°. pp. 8, n. p., n. d. From the "City Advertiser," C, Sep. 7, 
1859. — See p. 269. 

Hale, Rev. John (a native). See Bib., 1702. — Harris, Rev. T. M. 
(D.D.) (a native), do., 1796, 1801, 1842. (There is a large litho- 
graphic portrait of him by Pendleton; C. Harding Pinx') — 
Haynes, G., do., 1869. — Hilton, W., see p. 263. — Holden, O., 
Bib., 1792-1800, and Index herein. 

Hodgkins, Maj. Wm. H. (a native). Address delivered before Theo- 
dore Winthrop Encampment, Post 35, G. A. R., at Chelsea, May 
30, 1873. 8^. pp. 22. Boston, 1873. See p. 277. 

Hunnewell, James (o native). See Index, and Bib., 1809, 1880, p. 88. 

James F. (a native. See Index, and Bib.). A Sketch of the 

History of the First Church, C, in The Commemoration of its 
250th Anniversary, Nov. 12, 1882. 8". pp. 60. Privately printed 
[by him], 1882. 



296 AUTHOES. 

The Historical Monuments of France. Koy. 8°. pp. xiv -\- 336, 

•with 22 illustrations (equal to 25 full-paged). Boston, James R. 
Osgood & Co., 1S84. 

The Imperial Island, England's Chronicle in Stone. Koy. 8°. 

pp. xii -\- 13-445. 65 Illustrations. Boston, Ticknor & Co., 1886. 

England's Chronicle in Stone, derived from personal observation 

of Cathedrals, Churches, Abbeys, Monasteries, Castles, and Palaces, 
made during Journies in the Imperial Island. With Sixty Illustra- 
tions. Royal 8^. (pp. 447). John Murray, Albemarle Street, 
London, 1886. 

" All Aboard for San Francisco." First article, or "leader," 

in No. 1 of the " Transcontinental," May 24, 1870. 

Twelve numbers of this paper were printed in the Boston Board of Trade 
train to and from San Francisco, said to have been the tirst paper printed, 
at least to this extent, on a railroad train. By request the writer, who was 
of the party, furnished the above. Original copies of any of the numbers of 
this paper are very rare ; those bound and in circulation were subsequently 
printed in Chicago. The writer has an original file, with the proofs. 

Historical Sketch of the Society for Propagating the Gospel 

among the Indians and otliers in North America, 1787-1887, in the 
Centennial publication by the Society. 4°. Boston, 1887. 

This book also contains reprints of early publications b}' the Soc, also 
lists of all its members, missionaries, and its chief officers, prepared by J. F. H. 
of a Com? on publication. 

Relation of Virginia by Henry Spelman, 1609. First printed 

from the original MS., with an Introduction. Very small 4°. pp. 59 
(100 copies, and 50 larger, with double columns for Libraries). 
Privately jjriuted for J. F. H. Chiswick Press, London, 1872. 

A correct statement about this little book should be made, as it was re- 
printed (without the knowledge of J. F. H. ) by E. Arber, Birmingham, 
Eng., in his "Works of Capt. John Smith," 1884; present ownership only 
being there credited (p. xviii) to J. F. H., and the editorshiji, etc. (p. ci), 
to H. Stevens, London. The book is entirely the private property of the 
writer. He bought the ^IS., and Jlr. S. offered to look after it if he would 
have it printed at the Chiswick Press, as he could not remain in London. 
On his return home he wrote the Introduction and sent it to Mr. S., and it 
and the MS. were printed as proposed, Mr. S. altering, but in no material 
fact, the fu-st few pages of the Introduction, about the former history of the 
MS. The writer paid all bills, received all copies, never sold one, and gave 
copies chiefly to libraries ; and his experience shows the encouragement one 
may have to buy and print early MSS. in London. 

The Lands of Scott. Large 16°. pp. xi -|- 11-508. Portrait of 

Sir Walter Scott, and 4 folding maps. Houghton, Osgood, and 
Company. Boston, 1880. 

Now published by Houghton, Mifllin, & Co., uniform with their edition of 
Scott's Works, as have beeu the other editions of this book by James K. 



i 
1 



AUTHOES. 297 

Osgood & Co., and successors. Although the several issues have not been 
numbered, this is practically the fifth edition, the first having been in 1871. 
(See Preface of the present volume. ) 

Jackson, Rev. H. See Bib., 1830. — Johnson, Capt. Edward, do., 
pp. 1-2, and (herein). 

King, Rev. T. F. See p. 295, and Bib., 1836. —Rev. T. S., do., 1864. 

Lambert, Rev. T. R. (D.D.). See Bib., 18G1-71. — Lord, Rev. J. (a 
native), do., 1748, and p. 263 (herein). 

LovERiNG, Joseph (« native, 1811 ; Prof. Harvard Col.). Electricity, 
Magnetism, etc. Part I. of a Course of Physics. Boston, 1842, and 
II. of do. of jSTat. Phil., by J. Farrar. — Address before the Am. 
Ass'n for the Advancement of Science at Hartford, Aug. 14, 1874. 
8°. pp. 36. Salem, 1874. — Articles in its Proceedings, and those 
of Am. Acad. Arts and Sciences; also in N. A. Review, Christian 
Examiner, Am. Journal of Science, etc. ; and " Boston and Science " 
in Mem. Hist., IV. 

Lyon, II. W. (Lt. U. S. N.) (a native). Our Rifled Ordnance, a paper 
before the U. S. Naval Institute, Jan. 31, 1880. pp. 15. Clare- 
mont, N. H. [1880]. From vi., no. xi., Proc. of U. S. N. Institute. 

Marshall, Gen. J. F. B. (a native; see Bib., 1840, 1857). Report to 
the Legislature on the Flats of the Commonwealth, 1862. — Final 
do. of the Paymaster- General of the Com. of Mass., Dec. 15, 1866. 
Senate Doc. 4, pp. 16. — Indian and Southern Educational Work 
(Am. Unit. Ass'n), 1st Rep., Jan. 1887. pp. 16. — Does it pay to 
Educate the iSTegro? pp.5. Tuskegee, Ala., ISSQ. 

Miles, Rev. J. B. (D.D.) See Bib., 1857-76. 

Morse, Rev. J. (D.D.). The most voluminous author in Charlestown 
(See pp. 20-21). Besides pamphlets, histories, edited books, etc. 
(Bib., 1789-1819), his geographical works in all editions (no com- 
plete collection of which is known to the writer) are, — 

Geography Made Ea-iy. 16°. 2 maps. pp. 215. New Haven, 
Oct., 1784. —M ed., pp. 322, Boston, 1790. —3d, 12°, pp. 322, 1791. 
— 4th, pp. 428, May, 1794. —5/7i, pp. 432, May, 1796. — 6^A, pp. 
420, 1798. —7/A, pp. 432, Oct., ISOO.— 8th, Dec, 1802.— 10th, 
Mch., 1806. —14th, pp. 362, 1811. — I5lh, pp. 360, Aug., 1812. — 
16lh (also from this ed., pp. 360, Troy, 18U). — 19th, 1818.— 
SOth, Utica, 1819. —22d, pp. 3G8, 1820. —23d, 1822. — 2MK PP- 
360, 1824, as " A New System of Geography, Ancient and Modern, 
for the Use of Schools." By the Rev. J. and (his son) Sidney E. — 
All editions after the 1st (except 1814 and 1819) Boston. 

The American Geography. 8°. pp. xii -f- 534 -\- (1). Elizabeth' 
town, 1789. — [^d, English, 8°, pp. xvi -f- 530 + (table), 2 large 
maps, J. Stockdale, London, 1792, — "A New and Corrected " ed., 
8°, pp. 531 -j- (table), 7 maps. Edinburgh, 1795.] —2d ed., Ameri- 



y 



298 AUTHOES. 

cati, " being a new edition of the " above, as the American Universal 
Geography, 2 vols., 8° (I. Western Continent; II. Eastern do.), 11 
maps, pp. 1250, Boston, 1793. ["A New Edition, greatly enlarged 
by the Author," 25 maps, 4^, pp. (10) + 716. Stockdale, Lon- 
don, 1794.] — M pp. 15U0, 28 maps, do., 1796. —4th (3,000 copies), 
do., 1801-2. — 5lh (5,000 copies), 6 maps, atlas of 63 maps, do., 
1805. — 6lh, pp. 872 + 832 = 1704 (5,000), do., 1812. —7th, do., 
and C, 1819. 

The American Geography Abridged. There are said to have been 
15 editions, the 1st, Boston, 1790. 

Elements of Geography, 12°, pp. 143, Dec, 1795. — 2d ed, pp. 142, 
Feb., 1796.— 3d, pp. 144, Feb., 1798. —5th, 1804, all 2 maps, Boston. 

The American Gazetteer, 8°, pp. 600, 7 maps, 1797. —2d ed., 1804. 
— 3d, 1810. — Abridgement, 16°, pp. 388, June, 1798, — all Boston. 

New Gazetteer of the Eastern Continent, designed as a second vol. 
to the above, 8°, 18 maps, C., 1802. — 2d ed., mipaged, 1808. 

A New Unicersal Gazetteer (J. and his son E-. C), 3d ed., Aug., 
1821. — .4'/i, 8°, pp. 850, N. Haven, 1823. 

Compendious and Complete System of Modern Geography, an 
abridgement of the Am. Univ. G. pp. 670. Boston, 1814. 

Compendious History of New England (with Rev. E. Parish), map. 
12°. pp. 388. C, 1804. —^r/ ed., pp. 336, printed at Amherst, 
N. H., and published at Nemhuryport, 1808, 1809. —3d, pp. 324, C, 
1820, — also, pp. (2) vi (2) + 207, London, 1808. 

The Traveller's Guide; or Pocket Gazetteer of the U. S. With 
Appendix. 18°. 1823. —^(/ ed., map, 24°, pp. 330. Both New 
Haven; J. and R. C. Morse. 

A Geographical and Historical View of the World. By John 
Bigland. 5 vols. 8°. Boston, 1811. iJc/iVer/ by Rev. Jed. Morse. 
Sermon, Nov. 29, 1798. 8°. pp. 79. 2d ed. Printed by Sam- 
uel Hall, No. 53 Cornhill, Boston, 1799. — Do., April 25, 1799. 
Hartford, reprinted 8°. pp. 42. 1799. (For 1st eds. see Bib.) 
R. C, S. E., and S. F. B. See Bib., 1819 (also p. xiii). 



MoRTOx, Rev. Charles. See Bib., 1693, and p. 97. [Both natives? 

NowKLL, Alexander. Bib., 1665, and Rev. Sam!, do., 1678, and p. 97. 

O'Reilly, Boyle. The King's Men, A Tale of To-Morrow. By Robert 
Grant, John Boyle O'Reilly, J. S. of Dale, and John T. Wheel- 
wright, pp. (2) 4- 270. C. Scribner's Sons, New York, 1884. — 
In Bohemia, Poems. Portrait, pp. 97. Pilot Publishing Co., 
Boston, [1886]. (See Bib., 1873.) 

Osgood, Rev. S. (D.D.) (r< native). See Bib., 1880; Allibone, 1465. 

Penhallow, Judge S. See Bib., 1726, and p. 98. 

Perry, Com. M. C. (U. S. N.), do., p. 98. 

Preble, Admiral G. H. (U. S. N ). The First Cruise of the U. 8. 
Frigate Essex, with a short account of her origin, and subsequent 



INDEX. 



305 



Dead man, 244. 

Dean, 233-3G, 242. 

Deane, 275. 

Deans, 244. 

Dearborn, 7-10, 30, 116. 

Deaths, 255-60. 

Debating Soc, 279. 

De Berniere, 11, 113. 

DeCosta, 212. 

Dedham, 203. 

Deeds, 112, 113, 115. 

Deland, 152, 153, 173. 

Delano, 251. 

Delany, 256. 

Democrats, 30, 31, 43, 277. 

Dennis, 235, 236. 
E Derby, 252, 271. 

Derry, 253. 
' Devens, 27.91,189; B., 257; 
Ben. Soc, 63, 279; C, 
175,207,232,262,269,294; 
D., 34, 37, 167, 207, 221, 
224, 226, 227, 229, 230, 232, 
245,255,256; E., 179, 207, 
224,242,254; G., 230; M., 
199; R., 37, 72, 88, 123, 
131, 142, 155-57, 187, 229, 
262, 265,282, 294; S., 22, 
171, 226,248,294; St., 59, 
- 141. 

m Devon, 177. 
r Dexter, 80, 93, 96, 106, 126, 
145, 160, 175, 194, 206, 208, 
209,210,212,242,248,255, 
257; Row, 93,97, 145. 

Dickson (or Dixon), 240, 243, 
244, 248, 254, 255. 

Dillingham, 42, 294. 

Directory, 35, 36. 

Dizer, 133, 155, 163, 167, 170. 

Doane, 57, 97, 98, 239, 254. 

Dock, 33, 48, 125, 126. 

Doddridge, 286. 

Dodge, 22, 242. 

Doggett, 245. 

Donations (Come), 174. 

Doolittle, 33. 

Doopy, 242. [253, 282. 

Dorchester, 175, 203, 242, 251, 

Dorrington, 264. 

Doudney, 287. 

Dover, 253, 276. 

Dow, 48, 124, 130, 141, 254. 

Downes, 92. 

Dowse, 75; A., 194, 246; E., 
142, 148, 159; J., 78, 120, 
161; N., 120,127,170,194, 
245; S., 65, 120; T., 148. 



Dracut, 251. 

Drake, 99, 149. 

Draper, 147, 240. 

Dresden, 246. 

Drew, 251, 266. 

Dudley, 176, 249. 

Dunklee, 195, 196, 208, 209, 

211,212,215,217,218,220, 

2-24, 242, 258. 
Dmilap, 89. 
Dunnels, 236, 237. 
Durrell, 250. 
Durrie, 250. 
Dutton, 198. 

Duty, 197, 211, 213, 215. 
D wight, 105, 239. 

Eagan, 66. 

Eames, 205. 

Easter, 41. 

Eastern R. R., 46, 48, 57, 
132. 

Eastman, 247. 

Easton, 250. 

Eaton, 150, 151, 159, 160, 
251-53. 

Eddy (or Edy), 32, 169. 

Eden St., 90," 110, 150, 151. 

Edes, 29, 151; A., 249, 256; 
B.,209; C, 203, 232; E., 
215, 222; H., 89, 103, 140, 
157, 260, 262, 294; I., 133, 
134,137,168; J., 213, 220; 
M., 202, 209, 228, 233, 241, 
249 ; P., 65, 133, 134, 138, 
158;R.,209, 23.3, 234, 250; 
S., 157, 234; T., 149, 211, 
213, 215, 220, 222, 256. 

Edgeworth St., 64. 

Edinburgh, 286. 

Edmands; A., 207, 231, 244; 
B., 229, 231; C, 226; D., 
76, 131, 162, 196, 207, 210, 
214,219,222,226,229,231, 
241; E., 76, 217, 2-31; G., 
217,229; H., 219, 222, 2-31; 
J., 125, 141, 165. 200, 214, 
215,217,219,22.3,242,245; 
M., 196, 200, 205, 210, 225, 
234,247,253; N.,207; R., 
223,229,245; S.,214; T., 
217, 243; W., 121,215. 

Edson, 253. 

Elasson, 75. 

Elder, 273. 

Elisabethtown, 297. 

Elisone, 76. 

Ellery, 14, 152, 172. 

20 



Ellingwood, 246. 
Elliot, 6, 7, II, 268, 280. 
Ellis, 42, 145, 175, 177, 189, 

249, 274, 275, 294, 295. 
Ells, 246, 268. 
Elm St., 57, 87. 
Emanuel Col., 179, 180. 
Emerson, 196, 214, 242. 
Emery, 253. 
Ernes, 244. 
Emmons, 237, 283. 
Engine Cos., 36, 292. 
England, xii, 188, 196. 
Episcopalians, 40, 272, 273. 

See Churches. 
Essex; bridge, 20; frigate, 

298; "Gazette," 5, 6, 7, 68; 

Institute, 267, 268, 269. 
Esty, 54, 189. 
Etheridgo, 149, 199, 220, 223, 

282-88, 289-91. 
Eustis, 30, 236, 237, 251. 
Evans, 253. 
Evarts, 29, 37, 188, 202, 229, 

231, 289, 295. 
Evelyn, 268. 
Everett, 25, 37, 42, 64, 88, 

104,129,262,282,291,292, 

295. 
Everton, 77. 
Ewing, 238. 
Exeter, 266, 282. 

Fair, B. H. M., 80, 81. 

Fairbanks, 145. 

Falconer, 287. 

Falkirk, 263. 

Farley, 66, 246. 

Farmer, 254. 

Farnsworth, 196, 210, 213, 
214,230,241,244,247,253, 
254. 

Farrar, 252. !w /" n 

Fasset, 23»s- A> ^ J , 

Fast daj', 179. 

Fav, 41, 53, 189, 201, 205, 
2,34,241,250,260,291,295. 

Federalists, .30, 31. 

Fellows, 268. 

Felt, 227, 229, 230, 248. 

Fenton, 123, 151, 160. 

Fernald, 231, 232, 246. 

Ferrell, 235. 

Ferrv, 17, 85, 243; Chas. 
Riv., 9, 16, 126, 179 ; Mai- 
den, 10, 1.52. 

Fessenden, 196, 202, 242, 250, 
291. 



306 



IXDEX. 



Fielding, 286. 

Fields, 249, 269. 

Filield, 238, 253. 

Fillebrown, 173, 243, 2-14. 

Filmore, 28. 

File (1775), 2-15, 23, 185; 
(1835), 120; Companies, 
36; Societies, 36, 64-65, 
100, 170, 278. 

First Pari;;!!, 25. See Church. 

Fislier, xiii, 250. 

Fisk, 28, 35, 250. 

Fitchburg R. K., 37, 123. 

Fitz, 280. 

Flanders, 252. 

Flagg, 242. 

Fleet, 204, 273. 

Fleming, 286. 

Fletcher, 246, 253, 255. 

Flint, 42, 200, 202, 221, 224, 
226, 228-31, 233, 236, 244, 
248, 249, 253. 

Floyd, 241, 248, 256. 

Flucker, 14, 65, 138, 158; 
Fowle &, 158. 

Folsom, 281. 

Fohver, 251. 

Foote, 184. 

Force, 6, 263. 

Ford, 41, 65. 127, 158, 223, 
238, 248, 252, 256. 

Forster, 37, 63, 65, 92, 107, 
140. 145, 146, 240, 248. 250, 
254, 202, 270, 284, 295. 

Forts, 191. 

Fosdick; A., 77, 222; D., 
195, 198, 209, 211, 214, 216, 
219, 222; E., 207, 240; J., 
77, 127, 152, 100, 207, 214, 
255; M., 77,170, 195,198, 
240,244; S., 211, 219; VV., 
161. 

Fosket, 68. 

Foss, 37, 72, 80. 

Foster, 13; A., 119; B.,208; 
C, 253; D., 255; E., 244; 
G., 275; I., 128, 156, 157, 
169,208; P., 255; R., 78, 
119, 132, 101; S., 78, 119, 
202, 246 ; W., 75. 

Fowle, 77, 1.18, 142, 158, 163, 
240. 246. 247, 250, 265, 295. 

Fowler, 253. 

Fownell, 76, 77. 

Fox, 241, 251, 270. 

Foxcroft. 286. 

Foye, 65, 68, 127, 167. 

Framingham, 248. 



France, xii, 296. 

Francis, 219, 231, 247. 

Franklin, 264, 281, 283 ; St., 
277. 

Franks, 288. 

Free Dispensary, 63, 118. 

Freeman, 175, 247, 280. 

French, 275. 

Fresh Pond, 46, 273. 

Frisbie, 285. 

Front St., 124. 

Frost, 128,153,172,173,204, 
241, 243, 248, 251. 

Frothingham, 13,27,77,150, 
151; Abigail, 150, 159, 210, 
249, 257; Ann, 77, 180; 
Benj., 2.3, 107, 150-51, 159, 
196,197; C, 295; D.,247; 
E., 196, 216, 242; H., 197, 
240; H. K., 89, 224; I., 
223,246; Jacob, 255; Jas., 
27, 72, 90, 130, 142, 151, 
162, 188, 197, 210, 212, 214, 
216, 219, 259; J. K., 62, 
224, 246 ; John, 147, 150, 
156, 158; Jos., 143, 151, 
159, 249; L., 214, 252; 
M. A., 223; Mary, 77, 
201, 207, 249; M. C, 212; 
Mercy, 150, 168; N., 77, 
151, 156, 160; P., 77; R., 
90, 97, 151, 201, 207, 212, 
246,247,255,259; Hon.R., 
ix, 44, 101, 103, 107, 180, 
275, 279, 295; (B. H. 
Cent.), 267; (Hist. C), 
ix, 52, 54,66, 109,111, 114, 
115,263; (Siege of B.), 5, 
8,12,81,206; library, 262; 
(memoir), 275; Sally, 196, 
248, 258; Sam., 151, 161, 
258; School, 72; S. K., 
212; Sarah, 77, 150, 159; 
197, 210, 243; Sus.innah, 
240; S. W., 243; T., 98. 
107,150,159,210,219,202; 
Wni., 77, 90, 151, 160, 180. 

Fuller, 242, 244, 248, 251-53, 
290. 

Furnell, 234. 

Furniture, 14, .38, 96, 98. 

Furz, 130, 163. 

G.vr.E, 4, 5, 7, 8, 147, 201, 
211,213,217,219, 221,225, 
228, 232, 245, 246, 249, 252, 
253, 258. 

Gahm, 139, 140. 



Gale, 243. 

Gahver, 250. 

Gammell, 239. 

Ganvin, 242. 

Gardens, 18, 38, 87, 92, 93, 
95, 96, 148. 

Gardner, 25, 42, 43, 66, 114, 
14.3,163,196,209,211,214, 
235-37, 243, 275, 295. 

Garfield, 300. 

Garrett, 111. 

Gary, 280. 

Gas' Co., 49, 145. 

Geddes, 251, 255, 258. 

Gen. & Estates, C, 109, 112- 
14, 122, 125, 132, 138-40, 
142, 149, 153, 260, 265. 

Geneva, 00, 190. 

George III., 182. 

Gerbi, 42. 

Gerrish, 75, 235, 238. 

Gerry, 30, 248. 

Gettysburg, 294. 

Gibbs, 203, 246, 255. 

Gibson, 253. 

Giles, 251. 

Gill,30, 75, 78, 126, 161,243, 
266. 

Gilman, 250. 

Gleason, 246, 287, 290. 

Glidden, 107. 

Gloucester, 266. 

Goddard, 172, 173, 223. 

Going, 247. 

Goldsmith, 286, 288. 

Goodell, 123, 280. 

Goodhue, 222, 252. 

Gooding, 126. 

Goodrich, 248, 252. 

Goodwin, 255; A., 162, 200, 
220, 225,228,240; B , 122, 
167; C, 199, 223; D., 32, 
66, 129-31, 141, 162, 240, 
256; E., 126, 167, 199,216, 
220,223,240,243; G.,231; 
H., 240, 295; J., 131, 162, 
220,221,225,228,231,240, 
258; M., 146, 220, 221, 241; 
N., 243; P., 199, 220. 257; 
R., 169; S., 243; T., 122, 
157; W., 169, 200; Bra- 
dish &, 168. 

Goose, 295. 

Gordon, 89. 

(lore, 30. 

Gorham, 27; A., 240; D., 
215; L.,243; M., 167.212, 
241; N.. 18,22,23,30,33, 



INDEX. 



307 



65, 106, 117, 121, 156, 157, 
212, 2U, 215,2-11,258; K., 
240; S., 27, 198. 

Gosnold, 176. 

Gould, 37, 279. 

Graham, 211, 

Grand Army, 67. 

Grant, 107, "298. 

Graves, 42,78,118,124, 161, 
183, 191. 

Gray, 7, 211, 213, 216, 276. 

Great House, 2, 110, 113-15, 
191. 

Green, 42, 76, 77, 125, 151, 
153,159,179,182,184,208, 
216,218,221,235,239,241, 
243, 248, 252, 255-57, 262, 
265,268,277,290; St., 10, 
11, 33, 58, 92-94, 145, 140. 

Greenleaf, 42, 168, 169, 238, 
284, 295. 

Greenough, 287. 

Gregory, 205, 224, 227, 246. 

Gridley, 267, 284. 

GiJffin,75, 259,269, 287, 295. 

Griffith, 257, 

Grinnell, 42, 63, 295. 

Grover, 218, 219, 243. 

Groton, 176, 2B9. 

Grubb, 134, 165. 

Guild, 262. 

Gunnison, 295. 

Gunton, 98. 

Gurney, 253. 

Haalilio, 107. 

Hacey, 236. 
Hackett, 253. 
Haddington, 285. 
Hadlev, 194, 202, 208, 210, 

214,"217, 225,248,251,252. 
Hagar, 249. 
Haggett, 198, 201, 226. 
Haines, 137, 203, 204, 233. 
Hale, 179, 295. 
Halej', 243. 
Halifax, 288, 
Hall, 151, 207, 244-46, 253, 

254, 259, 275, 283, 287, 298. 
Hamilton, 42, 241. 
Hammett, 243, 246. 
Hammond, 77. 
Hamson, 248, 250. 
Hancock, 18. 30, 185, 152, 

160. 
Hanker, 169. 
Hannon. 238. 
Hanscomb, 252, 



Hansel, 252. 

Hanson, 254. 

Harding, 125, 126, 136, 155, 
158, 167, 255, 295. 

Harper, 250. 

Harrington, 195, 242, 253. 

Harris, 13, 29, 130, 131, 280; 
A., 210, 225; C, 55, 72, 
189; E., 202, 229; J., 33, 
66, 124, 127, 101, 163. 200,. 
215-17, 222, 225, 242, 259, 
265; L.,244; M., 200, 216, 
217,237,250; P., 208; R., 
216,257; S., 154, 166, 194, 
237, 241 ; T., 33, 130, 132, 
133,167,282,283,295; W., 
146,158,210,237; & Bates, 
168. 

Harrison, 37, 88, 96. 

Harrod, 207. 

Hartford, 200, 294, 297, 298. 

Hartshorn, 249. 

Harvard; J., 74, 78, 110, 118 ; 
Chapel, 64; Church, 50-57, 
90, 105, 146, 260, 272, 275, 
276,294; College, 182,183, 
202, 275, 282, 285, 289, 293, 
294, 297; monument, 74, 
78: Row, 87, 97; School, 
72, 73; St., 37, 71. 113, 
116, 123, 129, 130, 132, 137. 

Haskell, 267. 

Hassam, 275. 

Hastings, 118, 254, 286. 

Haswell, 198, 218. 

Hatch, 240, 251. 

Hathorn, 10, 250. 

Haven, 176, 177, 198, 276. 

Haverhill, 252. 

Hawaiian Islands, 93, 101. 

Hawkins, 21, 191, 252. 

Hawry, 249. 

Haws, 267. 

Hay; A., 196, 211, 243,245; 
J., 32, 92, 144, 145, 147, 
148,159,211,219,247; M., 
241; P., 209, 214; R., 147, 
196,211; S.,217; W.,144, 
209, 212, 214, 217, 219. 

Hayden, 76, 253. 

Hayes, 275. 

Haj-man, 76. 

Haynes. 225, 226, 229, 241, 
253, 295. 

Hays, 194. 

H.nyward, 198, 270. 

Head, 288. 

Hearsey, 20C, 249. 



\^ 



Heaton, 144. 

Hender, 155, 159. 

Henley; C, 198; M., 119; 

P. &, 168; R., 198, 245; 

S., 11, 13, 23, 65, 78, 118, 

125,127,128,161,223,276; 

St., 16, 52, 110, 113, 118, 

125, 128, 140. 
Henry, 98, 238. 
Heroii, 294. 
Herrick, 235.-'^ 
Hersey, 243. 
Hibbs', 249. 
Hicks, 128, 172. 
Hide, 6, 7. 
High; School, 72, 73; St., 

33, 57, 58, 80, 90-94, 96, 

97, 98. 
Hildreth, 218, 219. 
Hill (or Hills), 75, 170, 171, 

239, 242-45, 252, 257, 285. 
Hilton, 118, 263, 295. 
Hingham, 244. 
Historical Mag., 5, 6. 
Hitchings, 254. 

Hobbey, 224, 225. 

Hockey, 75. 

Hodgkins, 277, 295. 

Hoit, 72. 

Holbrook, 22, 248, 

Holden, 33, 65, 57, 94, 97, 
132,145,187,196,240,241, 
244, 250, 253, 254, 295. 

Hollar, 262, 

Hollingsworth, 98. 

Hollis, 241, 285. 

Holman, 42, 199, 242, 243, 
250. 

Holmes, 116, 220, 221, 223, 
226, 227, 253, 267. 

Holt, 213, 237, 

Holton, 246. 

Holyoke, 2G8. 

Hood, 127, 1.57, 257. 

Hooper; A., 200; B., 256; 
D., 197; E., 214, 256; H., 
211, 249; J., 169,196,210, 
211,220,241; M.,218; N., 
200; R., 195, 209; S., 16, 
220, 240, 241 ; T., 135, 143. 
195,209,211,214,218,220, 

240, 244. 
Hoosac, 46, 50, 125, 
Hopkins, 123, 129, 155, 157, 

197. 
Hopkinton, 288, 
Hopper, 42. 
Hoppin, 126, 135, 148, 159, 



308 



INDEX. 



164,171,240,255,236; &S., 
133, IGO. 

Horr, 42. 

Hosea, 247. 

Himghtoii. 235, 244, 296. 

Homlies, 36, 47. 

Houses; (kiml) 9, 10,11,87; 
(no. of) 5, 7, 12, 17, 18; 
Baker, 116,129: Baldwin, 
96; Block, 15; Boylston, 
144; Breed, 92; Bridge, 
88, 12y ; Commodore's, 
91; Frothingliam, 90, 98; 
"Great," 2, 51, 110, ] IS- 
IS, 191; Gorham, 117; 
Henley, 118-19; Holden, 
97: Hunnewell, 86, 93-96; 
Hurd, 88, 138 ; Kettell,92, 
105; Lock wood. 93; Make- 
peace, 88; Old, 86-97; 
Parsonage, 87 ; Russell, 
88-90; Swift, 92; Tufts, 
91; Warren, 131; Wood, 
149. 

Hovev, 223, 227, 228, 231, 
233-35, 244-46, 254, 288. 

Howard, 199, 205, 219, 247. 

Howe, 200, 222, 226, 244, 251- 
54, 286, 287. 

Hovt, 239. 

Hubbard, 178. 

Hubbell, 49, 59, 98, 107, 281. 

Hudson, 77, 184, 250. 

Hull, 44, 204, 244, 251, 280. 

Hulton, 10. 

Hunnewell; C, 86 ; H.,202, 
249 ; James, 35, 37, 52, 53, 
65, 79, 86, 93, 94, 97, 101, 
107, 204, 209, 240, 250, 295 ; 
(his house) 1, 2, 83, 93-96 ; 
J. F., 1, 2, 49, 78, 93, 94, 
101, 102, 103, 107, 240; 
(his works) xii, xiii, 12, 
18, 175, 193, 261-02, 295- 
97; J. M., iii, 70; John, 
215; Jos.,79. 132, 163; R., 
141,162; S., 240; T., 79; 
W., 23, 86, 131, 163, 173, 
215. 

Hunt, 37, 199-201, 220, 225, 
228, 230, 232, 234, 241, 242, 
247, 255, 276, 278. 

Hunting, 66. 

Huntington, 97, 98. 

Huntoon, 267. 

Hurd; A., 210,256; B, 11, 
21, 23, 138, 156. 158, 195, 
206,208,210,212,256; C, 



207; 
101; 
103, 
248, 
37,7 
134, 
207, 
139, 
249; 
248; 
Hutch 
Hutch 
104, 
Hvde, 
221, 
233, 



E., 75, 209, 249; F., 

G., 194,211,255; H., 
195, 199, 206-08, 244, 

202; I., 201; J., 33, 
5, 83, 90, 107, 120, 132, 
138,139,199,201, 206, 

209, 211, 258; J. S., 
212; M., 202,206,208, 

P., 195, 200 ; R., 199, 

S., 75; W., 37. 
ins, 44, 251, 252, 255. 
inson, 75, 131, 136, 
178, 205, 235, 241. 
199,202,215,217,218, 
224, 226, 223, 230, 231, 
235, 243, 248, 254. 



Immigeation, 23, 256-58. 
Indian Chief, 146. 
Indians, 175, 184, 191, 192. 
Ingersol, 203, 2.33, 248. 
Ingols, 241, 250. 
Institutions, Benev., 61-64; 

State, 82-85. 
Insurance, 35. 
lona, 192. 
Ireland, 23, 153, 172-74, 252, 

255. 
Ireson, 28. 
Ivory, 125. 

Jackixs, 241. 

Jackson, 24, 25, 72, 107, 204, 

229,232,251,254,258,297; 

Guards, 66. 
Jacobs, 117, 254. 
Jaffrey, 250. 
Jail, 140. 

James; I., 176; T., 179. 
Jamison, 76. 
Janes (or Jane), 224, 227, 229, 

230, 232, 233, 251, 253, 255. 
Janeway, 204. 
Japanese minister, 107. 
Jaques, 98, 107, 132, 154, 204, 

217,219,221,223,226,228, 

243, 249. 
Jaquith, 27, 204, 205, 230. 
Jefferson, 05. 
Jenkins, 198, 199, 234, 243, 

246, 249. 
Jenks, 204. 
Jenner, 75, 78, 122, 129, 131, 

162, 163. 
Jennings, 128, 173. 
Jewett, 235, 237, 254. 
Johnson, 131, 255, 288; C, 

221 ; E., 128, 136, 142, 146, 



164,165,167,221,246,256, 
297; G., 224, 227; H.,202, 
221, 232, 244; I., 65, 77, 
142; J.,221, 227, 2.32; K., 
128, 164 ; L., 218, 221, 224, 
227,243,252; M., 171, 224, 
248; N., 77; S., 88, 148, 
204, 205, 230, 232, 246, 286, 
289 ; Widow, 120. 

Joiner St., 9, 121, 125. 

Jones, 06, 76, 166, 198, 213, 
215,217,218,226,228,235, 
236, 245, 249, 253. 

Jourdan, 244, 252. 

Joy, 214, 242. 

Kamehameha, 107. 

Kapiolani, 107. 

Kathrens, 223. 225, 227. 

Keating, 223, 245. 

Keeder, 77. 

Keene, 254. 

Kehew, 252. 

Keimer, 264. 

Keith, 215, 217,219,243,289. 

Kelley, 171, 213, 243, 251, 253. 

Kemble, 259. 

Kempt, 245. 

Kendall, 42, 201, 223, 234, 

245, 251-53, 257. 
Kennev, 150, 161. 
Kent, 22, 44, 133, 153, 164, 

174, 247. 
Kettell, 29, 91.105,153,166, 

168, 263; A., 76, 77, 132, 
134, 106, 169, 198, 202, 227 ; 
B., 132, 202; C, 257; E., 
200, 247 ; G., 92, 93, 107, 
227; H., 193, 202,206,207, 
225, 228, 249; I., 257; J., 
22, 76, 77, 135, 137, 169, 
19-3,202,206,207,210,212, 
216, 228,251,257; M., 76, 
20.3,204,210,254; P., 194; 
R., 76, 77, 134, 135, 137, 
164; S., 76, 77, 137, 169, 
194, 198, 228. 255; S. C, 
203, 212; T,, 27, 203, 204, 
225,227,228,247; W.,134, 

169, 206. 
Kcw, 225, 246. 

Keyes, 201, 243, 244, 247, 
2.57, 258. 

Kidder. 203; A., 196, 227; 
C, 231; D., 234; E., 233, 
2.35; H., 211,224, 2-32: I., 
150,161,196, 257: J., 141, 
162,207,209,211,227,228, 



INDEX. 



309 



232-35, 247,256,257; M., 
75, 207, 226; S., 27, 139, 
141, 202, 224, 226, 229, 231, 
233, 235. 

Killen, 76. 

Kilton, 244. 

Kimball, 196, 247, 251. 

King, 26, 42, 122, 163, 248, 
295, 297. 

King Sol. Lodge, 89, 135, 145, 
273. 

Kingston, 196, 202. 

Kittredge, 42. 

Klous, 143. 

Knapp, 268. 

Kneeland, 25, 264, 288. 

Knight, 254, 259. 

Knoepfel, 212, 258. 

Knowhor, 111. 

Knowles, 129, 229. 

Knowlton, 12. 

Kossuth, 295. 

Ladd, 202, 248, 249. 

Lafayette, 107, 267, 292. 

Lafleur, 248, 250. 

Lakeman, 249. 

Lamb, 205. 

Lambert, 42, 91, 247, 297. 

Lamson, 152, 160, 194, 196, 
202,204,209,210,216,239- 
41, 250-52, 255, 281, 282. 

Lancaster, 205, 247. 

Lane, 258. 

Langdon, 121, 201, 211-13, 
215, 224, 226, 230, 245. 

Langley, 250, 287. 

Langworthy, 269. 

Lapham, 199, 251. 

Larkin, 258; A., 197, 207, 
214,219,221,250,255; C, 
228,243; E., 147, 157,165, 
205, 207, 210, 216, 233, 242, 
244, 252, 283-85; G., 216; 
H., 241, 256, 258; L, 205, 
209,211,214,217,219,223, 
226, 228, 230, 233 ; J., 32, 
37, 92, 122, 124, 134, 156, 
163, 207,217, 219; L., 75; 
M., 207, 209, 230, 241 ; N., 
241; R., 200, 209, 211,240, 
241; S.,122, 129,157, 197, 
200,207,210,216,244,247, 
284; T., 75, 122,157, 219, 
221, 223, 224, 244; W,, 
224; Z., 162. 

Larrabee, 220. 

Lathrop, 285. 



Laurel St., 92. 

Laurie, 42. 

Lawrence, 34, 49, 76, 80, 93, 
94, 111, 123, 125, 131, 163, 
220,239,241,242,252,275; 
St., 56, 294. 

Leach; J , 112-15, 118-22, 
125, 126, 128, 129, 134-36, 
140,147,151,233; M.,205, 
233; R.,110; T., 205, 233. 

Learned, 210. 

Leathe, 201. 

Leathers, 126, 166, 240, 241, 
256, 259. 

Lee, 26, 42, 75, 98, 107, 131, 
163, 274, 275. 

LeFebre, 166, 242, 257. 

Legion of Honor, 293. 

Legislature, Acts, 16, 18, 44, 
49, 79, 83, 84. 

Leighton, 250. 

Leman, 198, 213, 215, 217, 
219, 221, 222, 242, 243, 253. 

Lemon, 78, 120, 126, 127, 134, 

Leominster, 201. [162. 

Leppington, 65. 

Levasseur, 267. 

Leveston, 242, 243. 

Lewis, 131, 163, 200, 214. 237, 
238, 242, 246, 253, 290. 

Lexington, 1, 33, 185, 249, 
292; St., 98. 

Libraries, 14, 98-103; Ba- 
ker's, 99, 271; Circulat- 
ing, 99-100; Dowse, 148; 
Frothingham, 103; High 
School, 102; Hunnewell, 
96, 103; Losses (1775), 
98-99 ; Mather, 98-100 ; 
Mishawum, 101, 271 ; Na- 
val, 279; Private, 103; 
Public, 71, 101-2, 271,293; 
S. School, 102; Union, 100, 
104, 132, 271 ; Library As- 
sociation, 104. 

Lidgett, 154. 

Liliuokalani, 107. 

Lilly, 246. 

Lincoln, 30, 93, 176, 247, 254, 
268, 269 ; -shire, 177. 

Lindsey, 242. 

Litch, 252 ; -field, 252. 

Little, 137. 

Liverpool, 294. 

Lloyd, 242. 

Loan Ass'n, 63. 

Locke, 218, 219, 221, 222, 226, 
227, 241, 244, 248, 254. 



Lockwood, 93, 117. 

Lombard, 248. 

London, xii, 4, 52, 186, 262, 

263, 266, 267, 283, 294, 

296-98. 
Long, 76, 78, 114, 115, 257. 
Lonnon, 247. 
Lopans, 207. 
Lord, 28, 75, 169, 184, 254, 

258, 263, 297. 
Loring, 299. 
Lothrop, 6, 7, 250. 
Lotter}-, 16, 22, 80. 
Louisburg, 66. 
Louisville, 273. 
Lovering, 222, 225, 227-30, 

245, 297. 
Low, 205, 233. 
Lowden, 68, 76. 
Lowell, 36, 47, 95, 198, 254; 

papers, 112. 
Loyd, 75. 
Lucas, 245. 
Ludkin, 76. 
Luke, 76. 
Lund, 288, 289. 
Lundberg, 252. 
Lunenburg, 283. 
Lyceum, 71, 104, 291. 
Lyman, 245. 
Lynch, 109, 259. 
Lvnde,76, 120, 131, 134, 147, 

'l48, 161. 
Lyndon, 42. 
Lynn, 175, 201, 246, 251, 253 ; 

-field, 197. 
Lyon, 107, 146, 297. 

Maclaine, 289. 

Macknay, 249. 

Magoun, 254. 

Mahon, 42. 

Main, 25'2. 

Maine, 175, 198. 

Main St., 1, 10, 11, 16, 32, 
33, 36, 37, 47, 80, 88, 90, 
92, 94-96, 108, 110, 113, 
118, 123, 132, 133, 135-39, 
142, 143-52, 155, 179, 277, 
281, 282, 288. 

Makepeace, 88. 

Malcolm, 266. 

Maiden, 19, 47, 196, 202, 242, 
245, 251, 253, 254, 285; 
bridge, 10, 19. 

Mallet, 21, 68, 151, 160, 194, 
206-9, 211, 213, 240, 244, 
245, 247, 256-59. 



310 



INDEX. 



Manly, 251. ' 

Maiiii, 242. 

Manning, 122, 165, 172, 174, 

193, 194, 198, 206-9, 211, 

213,215,217,242,246,247, 

255-57, 259, 299. 
Mansir, 162, 195, 209, 240, 

241, 247, 255, 257. 
Manufactures, 18, 34, 35, 37, 

48. 
Marblehead, 244, 245, 285. 
Marcy, 248. 
Mard"len, 127, 167. 
Mardling St., 155. 
Marlboro', 20. 
Marple, 249. 

^Marshall, 132, 262, 275, 297. 
Marshfiekl, 251. 
Martha's Vineyard, 294. 
Martin, 5, 59, 70, 204, 232. 
Mason, xiii, 65, 129, 131, 147, 

161, 247; St., 131. 
Masonic, 17, 135, 137, 273- 

74, 292. 
Massachusetts; Archives, 12, 

112, 113, 152-53; Bay, 

191, 265; "Gazette," 68; 

Hist. Soc, 107, 112, 266, 

268, 275, 277, 280, 294; 

Mag., 19; Kecords, 30, 

111. 
Mather, 66, 98-100, 182, 183, 

263, 264. 
Matiiiessen, 281. 
Matignon, 69. 
Maudlin, 8. 
Maverick, 175. 
Maxwell, 217, 219, 221, 224, 

227, 228, 243, 246. 
May, 285. 
May hew, 245. 
McAlvin, 252. 
McDonough, 247. 
McGibbon, 214. 
McGrath, 42. 
Mclntire, 204, 232, 237, 242, 

246, 247, 251. 
McKenzie, 175, 182. 
McKown, 290. 
McLean, 37, 45, 85, 274; 

Asvlum, 85, 274. 
McMnion, 250. 
McNeil, 33, 142. 
McVicker, 267. 
Mead, 196, 203, 204, 222, 226, 

227, 232, 245, 240, 251. 
Medberv, 276. 
Medford, 10, 32, 47, 67, 70, 



194,196,199,202,241,246- 
49, 253, 254; river, 1, 68; 
St., 30. 

Meeting-houses (newer), 53- 
59; (old) 6, 7, 9, 17, 52, 
115, 116, 140, 184-85, 188. 

Mellen, 239, 254. 

Memorials, 112, 274-76. 

Merriam, 240, 237. 

Merrifield, 229-31, 243. 

Merrill, 248. 

Merrimac, 31, 177. 

Messenger, 282. 

Methodists, 28, 29, 40, 57, 58. 

Mexican War, 66. 

Middlegate St., 142. 

Middletown, 28, 245. 

Middlesex ; Canal, 31-32, 
271; Co., 18, 174. 

Mifflin, 296. 

Miles, 42, 190, 297. 

Military, 65-67, 276-77,294. 

Milk Kow, 47. 

Mill, 151; St., 47, 150, 151; 
Village, 10, 12, 150-52. 

Miller, 127, 185; C, 218; 
E., 153, 171,173,197,208, 
210,252; H., 201, 212, 257; 
J., 153, 172, 201. 206-8, 210, 
213,218,251; M., 206, 207, 
211,248, 252; P. 206; R., 
128,148,150,161, 259; S., 
152,155,156,172,198,245, 
248, 255, 256 ; T., 27, 167, 
197, 207, 242, 256; W., 
211, 212, 241; Hill, 85; 
St., 90, 146. 

Millerick, 42. 

Millmore, 82. 

Milton, 95, 285. 

Minister; see Churches; 
tomb, 78. 

Ministrj' at Large, 64. 

Minot, 171. 

Mirick, 155, 171, 201, 202, 
206.208,216,238,240,244, 
245, 251, 254, 256, 258. 

Missions, City, 63-64. 

Mitchell, 151, 206, 212, 227, 
229, 231, 234, 235, 244, 246, 
259, 252. 

Mob, 69. 

Monument; Avenue, 80, 134; 
Bank, 49; B. Hill, 79-81, 
98; Hall, 73; Harvard, 74; 
K. S. Lodge, 82; Masonic, 
274; mural, 57, 61; Pres- 
cott, 82; Soldiers', 82; 



Square, 29, 58, 97, 98, 
281. 

Montgomery, 64, 184. 

Moody, 42. 

Moor (or Moore), 127, 170, 
196, 223, 230, 255, 267, 269, 

Morals, Reform, 63. [283. 

Morgan, 250. 

Morris, 249. 

Morse, 294 ; C, 235 ; E., 210, 
234. 235, 250; E. A., 193 
207, 214, 219, 234; E. M 
252; E. R., 252; J., 20. 
21, 24, 26, 27, 33, 63, 107 
135, 187-89, 193, 201, 205 
207,208,210,211,213,214 
217,219,224,226,234,250. 
259, 260, 282, 285, 287-90 
(his works) 187, 297-98 
J. B., 42; J. E., 208, 257 
J.R.,217; M.,224; R. C. 
204, 211, 298; S., 66 
S. E., 63, 188, 204, 297 
298; S. F. B., xiii, 21, 72 
149, 189,203,207.234,298 
S. R., 226 ; S. W., 234 
T. K., 213. 

Morton, 30, 42, 76, 183, 298. 

Mosely, 241. 

Mosheim, 289. 

Mould, 77. 

Moulton, 36, 111, 247. 

Mousall, 76, 77, 179. 

Mt. Vernon St., 92. 

Mudge, 281. 

Mullet, 205, 258. 

Mulliken, 251. 

Munday, 243, 247. 

Munro,' 127, 165, 169, 197, 
212, 213, 247, 248, 279, 294, 

Murray, 199-201, 240, 242, 
281,"285, 296. 

Mussenden, 252. 

Mvstic; Pond, 50; River, 
47, 48, 154, 270; Water 
AVorks, 49-50. 

Nancrede, 299. 
Nantucket, 241. 
Navy Yard, 8, 10, 36, 37, 43, 

46, 47, 73, 83-84, 88, 91, 

97, 106, 111, 120,123,126, 

188, 280, 281. 
Neal, 98. 
Neck, 8, 9, 19, 36, 47, 48, 

57, 280; village, 10, 110, 

152-53. 
Negles, 248. 



INDEX. 



311 



N. E. Hist. Gen. Register, 
53, 191. 193, 268, 274, 275. 

Nelson. 247, 248. 

Newcomb, 76, 249, 250, 254. 

Newcome, 289. 

Newell, 168; A., 127, 135, 
168; B., 203,204; C, 118, 
136; E., 135, 136, 164, 200, 
207-09, 212, 243, 257 ; H., 
76,199; J., 76, 130, 169, 203, 
209; M., 76, 127, 136, 142, 
158,168; N., 198. 256; S., 
136, 198, 203, 207, 208, 212, 
251; T., 121, 154. 165. 

Newburv, 205, 242; -port, 
240, 267, 298. 

Newhall, 208, 210, 212, 217, 
240, 243, 246, 247, 256. 

New; Hampshire, 23, 268; 
Haven, 193, 202, 205, 293, 
298; Ipswich, 287 ; Jersey, 
194; -port, 7, 203; York, 
6, 23, 33, 267, 268, 274, 290, 
292, 293. 

Newspapers, 5, 6, 18, 35, 188, 
267, 277-78, 281, 290, 291. 

Nichols, 76,89,152,198,213, 
225, 229, 230, 246, 294. 

Nicholson, 42. 

Niles, 235, 242, 244-46, 253, 
254, 258. 

Noble, 92. 

Noddle's Island, 83. 

No man's land, 128. 

Norcross, 154, 157, 242, 247. 

Northfield, 249. 

Norton, 44, 222, 248, 258, 287. 

Nourse, 248. 

Nowell, 110, 118, 176, 178, 
179, 263, 298. 

Noyes, 277. 

Nuonno, 42. 

Nutinff, 130, 163, 216, 242, 
247,249. 

Nutting, 134, 248. 

Oak, Charlestown, 178, 191. 
Oakes, 182, 200, 244, 246, 

251, 263, 274. 
Oakman, 238, 239, 254. 
O'Callagan, 284. 
Odin, 37, 121, 165. 
Oliver, 223, 242, 245, 250, 

252, 287. 
Olney, 246. 
Oregon, 292. 

O Reilly, 103, 262, 298. 
Orr, 127, 167. 



Orton,286. 

Osburn, 141, 163. 

Osgood, 27, 200. 205, 214, 
217, 220, 221, 224, 226, 228, 
229,231,234,2.36,252,261, 
266, 285, 296-98. 

Otheman, 28. 

Otis, 242, 293. 

Owebridge, 258. 

Paddock, 257. 

Page, 11, 42, 113, 171, 238, 

239, 254. 
Pain, 151, 153, 159. 
Paine, 6, 20, 76, 186, 196, 258, 

291. 
Paintings, xiii, 72, 266, 267. 
Palfrey^ 43, 177. 
Palmer, 111, 224, 225. 
Panorama, 73. 
Paris, 73, 267. 
Parish, 290, 298. 
Parish, First, 17, 25, 63, 

186-88, 284, 285; lands, 

110; Co., 97-98. 
Parker, 42, 76, 124, 163, 181, 

197, 199, 202, 207, 208, 210, 

213, 215-17, 219, 220, 222, 

225, 228, 242, 243, 245, 248- 

50, 252, 253, 255, 273, 277. 
Parks, 240. 
Parmentier, 292. 
Parsonage, 87, 95, 97. 
Parsons, 18. 
Passarow, 253. 
Patch, 246. 
Paterson, 245. 
Patten, 76, 201. 
Paul, 258. 
Pavson, 21, 22, 29, 196, 200, 

208-17, 220, 223, 241, 251, 

257, 282, 284, 
Peabody, 204, 232-34, 248. 
Pear, 251. 
Pearson, 251. 
Pease, 250. 
Peatfield, 77. 
Peck, 133, 167. 
Peirce (or Pierce), 28, 37, 77, 

89, 107, 150,161, 164, 169, 

173, 245. 251, 254, 259, 275. 
Pelham, 201, 246. 
Pendleton, 295. 
Penhallow, 184, 298. 
Penniman, 247, 253. 
Pennington, 255. 

Pennv, 76, 128, 159, IGO, 165, 

174, 243, 255. 



Pepperell, 33, 196, 241. 

Perkins, 245. 

Perry, 79, 94, 203, 204, 232, 
237, 251, 254, 257, 298. 

Peter, 258. 

Peterboro', 199, 245. 

Peterson, 248. 

Pettingal, 247, 251. 

Pharus, 77. 

Phelps, 33. 

Philadelphia, 29, 99, 188, 200, 
264, 266, 267, 270, 299. 

Philip's War, 66, 99, 179, 191. 

Phillips, 42, 76, 78, 79, 98, 
110,115,118,120,121,127, 
142, 145, 162, 169, 197, 217, 
218, 234, 235, 243, 264, 276, 
282 ; Acadeni}', 288. 

Phinnev, 199, 202, 229, 231, 
232, 248, 253, 291. 

Phipps, 256; A., 229, 2-32; 
B., 21.3, 243; E., 169, 209, 
229, 247,258; J., 144, 173, 
205,209,213,249,250,256; 
K., 143; L.,230; P., 243; 
S., 66, 77, 205, 240, 246, 
257; W., 229, 230, 232, 
293. 

Phoenix; Bank, 35; Fire 
Soc, 65, 100. 

Pidder, 251. 

Pierpont, 235. 

Pike, 243. 

Piles, 128, 167. 

Pilgrims (The), 177. 

Pilsbury, 242, 254. 

Piper, 244. 

Pitcairn, 266. 

Pitcher, 168. 

Pitt (or Pitts), 245, 250. 

Pittsfield, 290. 

Plans, xi, 2, 109, 112, 113. 

Pleasant St., 135, 282. 

Ploughed Hill, 69. 

Plvmouth, 175, 177, 192, 291. 

Pollard, 217, 220, 221, 224, 
227, 245. 

Polly, 242. 

•Ponifret. 198. 

Poole, 101, 143, 205, 223,226, 
229, 230, 233-38, 255. 

Poor, 245. 

Poor's Fund, 61. 

Pope, 72, 286. 

Poplar Grove, 85. 

Population, 45, 255-59; char- 
acter of, 14. 15, 2.3, 36-37; 
number, 18, 23, 24, 36, 36, 



312 



INDEX. 



45 ; immigration, 23, 256- 

58. 
Porter, 201, 224, 226, 228, 231, 

238, 248, 249, 252, 280. 
Portland, 188, 266. 
Portsmouth, 188, 199, 248, 

276. 
Possessions (Book), 109, 110, 

114, 124. 
Potter, 245. 
Poughkeepsie, 267. 
Powder House, 67-68. 
Powers, 42, 117, 126, 130, 

155,163,166,168,171,225, 

240, 247, 255, 266. 
Praddox, 210. 
Pratt, 110, 152, 201, 210, 217- 

19, 222, 225, 228, 238, 241, 

246, 254, 257, 258, 272. 
Pray, 252. 
Preble, 84, 262, 298. 
Prentice, 15, 20, 57, 115, 116, 

161, 183, 184, 299. 
Prentiss, 28, 78, 289. 
Prescott, 6, 82, 253, 276; 

Guards, 67; school, 72; 

St., 141; Statue, 82. 
Preston, 155, 168. 
Price, 76. 
Prideaux, 257. 
Prince, 188. 
Princeton, 277, 282. 
Printinjr, 20. 281-92. 
Prison, 84-85; bridge, 20. 
Procter, 205, 242, 243. 
Providence, 6, 204, 241, 246. 
Puritans, 176, 177, 181, 192. 
Putnam, 173, 194, 210, 212, 

214, 241, 257, 267, 277, 286. 

Quakers, 180-81. 
Quarco, 255. 
Quarry-hill, 68. 
QuickC 111, 
Quincy, 54. 

Radford, 200. 

Rafferty, 254. 

Railroads; B. & M., 270; 

C. Branch, 45, 46, 273; 

Eastern, 46, 48, 57, 132; 

Fitchburg. 46, 271 ; Horse, 

47 ; Lowell, 45, 47. 
Ralston. 170. 
Ranisav, 89, 268, 289. 
Rand,'l3, 61; A., 76, 135, 

143, 170, 172, 199, 215, 240, 

246,258; B.,148; C, 120, 



173,279,281,292; D.,135; 
E., 76, 130, 144, 163, 198, 
215,216,240,243; F., 243; 
G., 229, 230,231,248; H.. 
209, 237, 244; I., 143; 
Dr. I., 33, 120, 130, 147, 
148, 155, 161; J., 76, 118, 
131,135,143,144,159,162, 
171,208,230,241; L.,204, 
232, 236, 237; M., 76, 155, 
159, 173, 216, 236, 240, 245, 
254; N., 131, 135,144,162, 
163,164,240,243,2.58; P., 
236; R., 172; S., 76, 1.36, 
164, 208, 209, 231, 237, 255, 
257 ;T., 76, 131, 144, 162, 
163, 204, 232. 241, 243, 247, 
249; W., 215, 237, 241, 299. 

Randall, 254. 

Randolph, 205. 

Rankin, 42, 299. 

Ranlett, 277. 

Raymond, 171, 199, 206, 208, 
231,242,243,250,255,256, 
291. 

Rayner. 143, 148, 161, 163, 
166, 194, 201, 257, 259. 

Read, 203, 204, 219, 220, 226, 

227, 230, 258. 
Reading, 195, 197, 201, 203, 

205, 241, 242, 244, 252, 254. 

Real estate, 45 ; dealings in, 
32-33. 

Rebaro, 246. 

Record; Com., 109, 200; 
Town,12, 1.3, 112,113,155- 
6, 193, 260; see Church, 
Mass. ; Parish, 37. 

Reed, 12, 23, 66, 97, 119, 133, 
145, 170, 199, 217, 218, 222, 

228, 232, 233, 240-44, 246, 
247, 250, 252, 258. 

Reformation, 173. 
Regiments, 67, 276-77. 
Reid, 289. 
Remington, 249. 
Republicans, 43, 286. 
Revere, 186, 300. 
Reynolds, 250, 251. 
Rhode Island, 175. 
Rhodes, 127, 141, 168, 197, 

214, 253, 259. 
Rice, 273. 
Rich, 253, 2-54. 
Richards, 234, 236-38, 248, 

252. 
Richardson, 195, 197, 202-4, 

209, 218, 231, 232, 235-37, 



240, 243, 245, 247, 248, 253, 

254, 292. 
Richmond, 252; St., 59. 
Riddle, 42, 146. 
Ridgeway, 243. 
Risborough. 2.52. 253, 
Robbins, 203, 216, 217. 219, 

231,241,243,245,246,250, 

256, 259. 
Roberts, 242, 244. 
Robertson, 237, 249, 
Robinson, 44, 77, 252, 254, 

267, 276, 284, 299. 
Rockwell, 43. 
Rockwood, 199. 
Rodenburg, 292. 
Rogers, 200, 217, 221, 227, 

230, 232, 244, 248, 249, 253, 

257, 265. 
Rollin, 286. 

Roman Church, 38, 175. See 
Catholics. 

Romans, 3. 

Rose, 205, 233, 255. 

Roulstone, 66, 121, 241. 

Rowe, 286. 

Rowland, 250. 

Rowse, 76. 

Roxbury, 7, 33, 245, 246, 248, 
249, 287, 

Royalston, 201, 

Rugg, 202, 203, 228, 231-33, 
236, 238, 239, 249, 252, 254. 

Runey (or Ronev). 126, 108, 
207, 209, 213, 215, 216, 218, 
240, 241, 258, 

Russell, 13, 14, 27, 33, 79; 
Academy, 92; A., 78, 230, 
241; B.J251; C, 65, 114, 
121,161; D., 12.3,184; E., 
242; F., 258; J., 23, 65, 
78, 89, 115, 123, 124, 157, 
170,184,212,236,254,282, 
299; K., 78; M., 78, 170, 
198, 287; R., 61, 76, 78, 
184; S., 122. 161,198, 245; 
T., 18, 22, 52, 88, 123, 154, 
157,184,254,275,299; W., 

. 22, 173. 

Ryall, 76. 

Rydal Mount, 91. 

Ryland, 290. 

Sabells (or Sables), 245, 

253. 
Sackett's Harbor, 194. 
Safford, 42. 
Salem, 20, 32, 175, 201, 204, 



AUTHORS. 299 

career until captured by the Britisli in 1814, and her ultimate fate. 
8°. pp. (2) 108. Salem, 1870 (from Hist. Colls, of Essex Ins., x.). 
See Bib., 18G8-72. 

Prentice, Rev. T. See Bib., 1743-68. 

Rand, Rev. Wm. (a native), do., 1735. 

Rankin, Rev. J. E. (D.D.). See Bib., 1865. — A Pastor's Remem- 
brance for the Sabbath School. (10°?). pp. 8, C, May 25, 1862. 

Robinson, Hon. C; Jr. See Bib., 1805-66; 1871. 

Russell, John Miller (A. ]\I.) (a native). Oration pronounced at C, 
July 4, 1797, at the Request of the Selectmen, Artillery Co., and 
Trustees of the School. 12°. pp. 16. C, and a 2d ed., pp. 15, 
Philadelphia, 1797. — A Poem on the Fourth of July, 1798 (pp. 
2-13), and An Ode or Song for do., to the tune of " God save the 
King" (pp. 14-16). Boston, 1798. — The Pastoral Songs of P. 
Virgil Maro. To which are added, Poems, Sentimental and De- 
scriptive. 12°. pp. 92. Boston, 1799. Both printed by Manning 
& Loring. — A Funeral Oration on Gen. George Washington. 8°. 
pp. 22. Printed by John Russell, for Joseph Naucrede, No. 49 
Marlboro' Street, Boston, 1800. 

Titles enlarged from the waiter's copies, those in Bib., p. 88, having been 
taken from catalogues. The author (b. in C, 1768) was a son of Hon. Thos. 
R., and the only author whom the writer has found in this family long so 
prominent in C. If the Oration — 1800 — was ever delivered, the place is 
not given. Tlie last three works are some of the rarest after the Revolution 
mentioned in the Bibliography. 

Sawyer, Hon. T. T. (a native). See Index, and Bib., 1855-57. — Wm. 
{do.), do., 1838 (and p. 280). — Shepard, Rev. T. See pp. 262, 
263, and Bib., 1659, 1672, also p. 98. — Rev. T., Jr., do., p. 98. — 
SiMONDS, Wm., do., p. 98. — Skinner, Rev. T., do., 1762.— 
Stevens, Rev. J., do., 1723 (also p. 264, ante). — Stone, Hon. J., 
do., 1873-74. — Hon. J. M., do., 1868-69. — Hon. P. J., do., 1862- 
64. — Sullivan, J. L., do., 1813, 1818 (also p. 271, ante). — 
Symmes, Rev. T., do., 1720, and p. 98. — Rev. Z., do., pp. 98, 99. 

Tappan, Rev. B. (D.D.). See Bib., 1855, 18G4. — Thatcher, Rev. 
T. See p. 2G3. — Thompson, A. R. (M. D.) (a native). Bib., 
1841, 1856; Hon. B. {do.), do., 1850, 1852; Benj. (p. 263, an/e); 
Judge D. P. {do.). See Allibone's Die. of Am. Authors, III. 2391, 
for his numerous works. (The writer finds that probably no me- 
morial of him was prepared.) — Thurston, Elizabeth A. See 
Bib., 1866. —Todd, Rev. John (D.D.), do., p. 99. — Trafton, 
Adeline, do., 1872. — Rev. M., do., 1873. — Turner, Rev. E., do., 
1814-23. 

Tufts, Joseph. Poetry of the late. Published by Request. 16°. 
pp. 16. Edmund Tufts, Somerville, 1846. 



^00 AUTHOES. 

TwoMBLT, Rev. A. S. (D.D.). Sermon, Sep. 25, on the death of 
President Garfield. 8°. pp.18. 5o*7o?i, 1881. — Free Fiction for 
the People. Reprinted from the Andover Review, Aug. 8°. pp. 14. 
Cambridffe, 1884. See Churches, p. 27-3, and Memorials. 

Walker, Rev. J. (D.D.). See Bib., 1820-39, 1875. —Timothy, do., 
1830. 

Warren, Hon. G. W. (a native). The Duty of Strengthening Liberia. 
An Address at Washington, D. C, at the 63d Annual Meeting of 
the Am. Colonization Soc, Jan. 20, 1880. Published by Request 
of the Soc. pp. 8. Washington City, 1880. — Our Republic, — 
Liberty and Equality founded on Law. Oration in the Boston 
Theatre, July 4, 1881, to the City Council, etc. pp. 62, and printed 
by its order. Boston, 1881. — Gov. Winthrop's Return to Boston. 
A Poem, read to the Thursday Evening Club, Apr. 20, 1882. Illus- 
trations. 300 copies. Sm. 4°. pp.28. £os/on, 1883. — The Vale, 
dictory Poem before the Class of 1830, delivered in the College 
Chapel, July 13. 8^ pp. 16. Camhrid(je, 1830. — For other 
works, see Bib., 1847-71, and B. Hill; also Memorial, p. 276. 

Welsh, Dr. Thos. (a native?). See Bib., 1783, 1796. 

Wheildon, Wm. W. The American Lobster, pp. 10. 1874. — Semi- 
centennial of the Opening of Faneuil Hall Market, Aug. 26, 1875, 
with a History, etc. (including a Poem by N. Childs, of C). pp. 112. 
Boston, 1877. — Sentry or Beacon Hill. 8^ pp. 120. — Paul Re- 
vere's Signal Lanterns. 8°. pp.64. Concord, 1878. — New Chap- 
ter in the History of Concord Fight, pp. 32. Boston, 1885. See 
Bib., and p. 291, for printing by him in C. He may fairly be called 
the veteran of the Press in Charlestown. He was active in many 
public affairs, as well as in his business, and in his paper, the 
"Aurora" (p. 277), he has left extensive and valuable contribu- 
tions, made through forty years, to the local history. 

Wilson, Rev. J. See Bib., pp. 1 and 99. — Winthrop, Gov. J., do., 
and Index. — Wyman, T. B. (a native). See Bibliography. 



ADDITIONS: PRINTERS. 

Davidson, George (p. 291). Female Policy Detected (1824). — Son of 
Genius (1826). — Letter- Writer. — Washington's Farewell Address 
(1827). — The Children of the Abbey, a Tale, by Regina Maria 
Roche. 1st Am. from the last London ed. 12°. pp. 234 (1829). 
— Zimmerman on Solitude. — Sailor Boy (1830). 

Etheridge, S., Jr. (p. 289) Observations on various Passages of 
Scripture, etc., by the Rev. Thomas Harmer, with Additions, etc., 
by Adam Clarke, LL. D. 1st Am. from the 4th London ed. 
4 vols. 8°. 1816-17. 



INDEX. 



Abbot, 61, 116,143,152,160, 
183,211,246,250,265,280, 
292. 

Aberdeen, 263, 291. 

Abington, 204. 

Aborn, 234. 

Abrahams, 131, 147, 164, 167, 
168, 200. 

Ackworth, 249. 

Acuter, 244. 

Adams, 29, 100; A., 27, 77, 
147, 172, 199, 203, 205, 221, 
225, 228, 231, 233, 235, 237, 
245,250,251,285; B.,249; 
C, 35, 225, 233, 235, 237; 
E., 88, 94, 235, 254; G., 
225, 231 ; H., 77, 198, 228, 
235,246; J., 30, 35, 44, 65, 
99, 164, 174, 223, 225, 235, 
244,256,267,274,279; L., 
243,245; M., 221,254; N., 
32, 76, 92, 134, 156, 164, 
198; R., 245; S., 235,242, 
244; Z., 222, 283. 

Addison, 286. 

Admirals, 184. 

Affleck, 251. 

Aikin, 283. 

Albany, 6, 7, 293. 

Alexander, 33, 37, 93, 202, 
204, 228. 

Alford, 293. 

Allein, 286. 

Allen, 30, 76, 90, 180, 220, 
221,223,239,240,244,246, 
251, 255, 257, 262, 281, 292. 

Alley, 244. 

Allibone, 298, 299. 

Almshouse, 133. 

American; Acad., 293; An- 
tiq.Soc, 100, 107, 185,188, 
263, 264, 277 ; Mem. Hist., 
268 ; Shrine, 190-92. 

Ames, 253. 



Amesbury, 243, 253. 

Amherst," 245, 249, 298. 

Ammidon, 248. 

Amory, 276. 

Amusement, Places of, 73. 

Ancient Fire Soc, 65, 100, 

Anderson, 76, 282. 

Andloe, 242. 

Andover, 200, 205, 246, 247, 
251, 275, 282. 

Andrews, 202, 282, 284. 

Angier (or Ainger), 202, 224, 
228, 229, 231, 252. 

Annexation, 43, 44, 102, 269- 
70. 

Appleton, 80, 294. 

Arber, 290. 

Arlington, 07. 

Armstead, 241. 

Armstrong, 143, 248, 278, 
286-88. 

Arnold, 119, 254. 

Arrowsmith, 290. 

Arrow St., 113, 129, 130, 141. 

Art; American, 70; Chris- 
tian, 54,55, 00-61, 189-90. 

Artillery; Co., 18, 66, 114, 
183, 282, 283, 299; Elec- 
tion, 66, 285. 

Ashby, 203, 241. 

Atwa'ter, 241. 

Augusta, 291. 

Austin, 13, 118, 126 ; A., 75, 
21.3,202; B.,286; D., 131, 
211,213,215; E., 121, 1.31, 
139, 215; F., 91, 94; H., 
198, 213,245; I., 22.5, 258; 
J., 117, 127, 131, 157, 166, 
167, 213, 255, 262, 292; 
John, 121, 124, 126, 146, 
158, 198; L., 211; M., 
120,121,139,158,242,244; 
N., 23, 121, 126, 130, 137, 
164, 166; R., 75, 121,126, 



166; S., 171, 213, 257, 258; 
T., 117, 126, 134, 146, 169, 
251; W., 90, 94, 136, 225, 
283, 285, 292. 

St., 33, 35, 56, 147. 



Avery, 291. 
Ayers, 247, 259. 

Babe, 217, 220. 

Babbitt, 280. 

Bachelor, 75. 

Back St., 9, 33, 110, 111, 119, 

133, 143. 
Bacon (or Bacorn), 146, 254. 
Badger, 131. 136, 164, 184, 

250, 265, 291, 292. 
Bailey, 42, 196, 234, 235, 237, 

240, 243, 252, 254. 
Baker, 88, 99, 107, 116, 129, 

131,224,227,2.30,2.31.236, 

245, 246, 248, 259, 271. 
Baldwin, 37, 84, 97, 245, 274, 

292. 
Balfour, 57, 89, 272, 274, 287, 

201, 292. 
Ball, 251, 2.59. 
Ballard, 77, 121. 
Ballatt, 77. 
Ballon, 272, 275, 
Baltimore, 273. 
Bancroft, 136. 
Banister, 201. 
Banks, 34-35, 49, 118, 121, 

145, 269. 
Banner, 225. 
Banton, 210, 257. 
Baptists, 24-25, 40, 55, 57-58. 
Barber, 147, 153. 
Bardstown, 273. 
Barker, 73, 98, 153, 159, 169, 

194, 200, 205, 207, 209, 211, 

213-15, 221, 225, 227, 229, 

231,2.3.3,241,244,247,249, 

250, 252, 258, 293. 



302 



INDEX. 



Barnard, 3, 286. 

Ijarues, -Zbi. 

Barnstable, 25'i. 

Barrel!, 85, 197, 242, 244, 251, 
253. 

Barret (or Barrot), 153, 245- 
47, 258. 

Barrington, 241. 

Barrow, 287. 

Barruel, 284, 

Barry, 239. 

Bartholomew, 76. 

Bartlett; A., 218; C, 211, 
213,214,218,221,240,248, 
254; E., 201, 207, 208, 
245; G., 23, 88, 117, 121, 
128, 143, 203, 210-15, 217, 
221,225,241; H.,217; J., 
23,105,208,225,254; Jos., 
16, 18-22, 24, 30, 34, 50, 
57, 88, 110, 135, 1.37, 138, 
142,201,207,208,210,211, 
214,218,241.242,255,257, 
273,281,282,289,293; K., 
169; M., 143, 203, 215, 218; 
N., 212; R., 211, 249. 

Barton, 240, 262. 

Bass, 255. 

Rassett, 244. 

Bateman, 130. 

Bates, 130, 108, 244. 

Baxter, 75, 151, 288. 

Baylie.*, 251, 292. 

Beach, 43. 

Beacham, 1.52, 153, 160, 242. 

Beal, 152, 160. 

Beard, 245, 250. 

Bearse, 238. 

Beatty, 252. 

Beaverstock, 251, 253-55. 

Becham, 196. 

Beck-, 250. 

Bedford, 255. 

Beecher, 42, 203, 269. 

Belcher, 238, 244. 

Belknap, 268. 

Boll, 269. 

Bellamy, 277, 290. 

Bellow.s 244. 

Bells. 52-.53, 55, 189. 

Bemis, 136, 245, 240, 250. 

Benevolent Ins., 61-64, 188, 
270. 

Benjamin, 75. 

Bennct, 144, 236, 244, 246, 
251, 254. 

Beimoch, 222. 

Bent, 42, 248. 



Bentle, 76. 

Beridge, 111. 

Best, 120, 168. 

Betts, 75. 

Beverly, 175. 

Bible, 184, 284-85, 289, 291. 

Bibliography, ix, 20, 113, 

Bidiiu'rd, 145. [139, 261. 

Bickner, 75. 

Bigelow, 89. 

Bigland, 298. 

Billerica, 245, 249. 

Billings, 250. 

Binney, 94, 280. 

Birchmore, 235, 236. 

Bird, 216, 219, 242, 245, 246, 
250. 258. 

Birmingham, 296. 

Births, 255-58. 

Bispham, 194, 209, 211, 213, 
258. 

Bixbv, 266. 

Blackler, 244. 

Blain, 42. 

Blake, 247, 249, 252, 253. 

Blanchard, 217, 228, 229, 
232, 242, 247, 248, 252, 253. 

Blanev. 76, 153. 

Blasdell. 244, 249, 252. 

Bliss, 286. 

Blodget, 252. 

Blood, 145, 241. 

Bodge, 128, 247, 258. 

Bogman, 247, 248. 

Boiies, 245, 280. 

Bolton. 225. 

Bonar, 287. 

Bond, 249. 

Bonnard, 275. 

Bontecue, 28. 

Bootman, 257. 

Borland, 174. 

Bossuet, 251. 

Boston, 2, 5-8, 11, 14, 19, 44, 
68, 69, 72, 85, 99, 100, 178, 
240-55, 261, 263-67, 209- 
72, 287. 2.' 8. 292, 293, 294, 
295, 290, 297, 298; Mem. 
Hist., 3, 22, 99, 149, 294, 
297. See Churches. 

Boutwell, 43, 269. 

Bowdoin, 117,143; -ham, 247. 

Bowen, 201, 220, 222. 225, 
226, 230, 232, 233, 244, 247, 
293. 

Bowers, 247. 249. 

Bowles, 242. 247. 

Bowman, 172, 249, 250. 



BoTvSt., 10,32, 59, 113, 129- 

32, 136, 141, 142, 279. 
Boyd, 42, 90. 
Boylston, 120, 133, 139, 144, 

147, 158, 164, 194, 199, 241, 

247, 258; chapel, 57. 
Brackenbury, 75, 111. 
Brackenridge, 4. 
Bracket, 42, 228, 250. 
Bradbury, 201, 205,221, 227, 

229, 231, 233-35. 237, 244. 
Bradford, 238, 251, 266, 279, 

289, 293. 
Bradish. 130-33, 140, 146, 

158, 162, 108. 
Bradley, 218, 268. 
Bradshaw, 215. 
Bradstreet, 27, 65, 119, 120, 

164,183,198,204,229,242, 

203, 293. 
Braintree, 283. 
Brasier, 120, 130, 131, 159, 

160, 162, 169, 199, 241, 255, 

250, 259. 
Brattle, 47, 204. 
Breed, 21. 32, 65, 76, 88, 91, 

92, 114, 116, 121, 123, 127, 

156-58, 168, 170, 214, 236, 

237, 258. 
Breese, 194, 201, 248. 
Brega, 288. 

Brewster, 137, 235, 239. 
Brick-making, 34, 48. 
Bridge, 23, 33, 37, 88, 90,93, 

116,129,141,232,245,275. 
Bridges, 45, 46, 270-71 ; new, 

271 ; swing, 125. Ste 

Charles, Maiden, Warren. 
Brigden, 77, 122. 131, 157, 

100, 228, 229, 232, 234, 243, 

254, 256-58. 
Briggs, 42. 
Brighton, 95, 284. 
Brinckley, 243, 247, 257, 258. 
Brinley,"264, 265, 268, 281. 
Bristol", 263. 
British (1775-76), 1,2-14, 16, 

94, 149, 155-56. 
Brooke, 75. 
Brooklield, 244. 
Brooklinc, 248, 253. 
Brooklyn, 190, 198. 
Brooks", 30, 33, 42, 79, 240, 

246, 249, 274. 
Broomlield, 206, 255. 
Brown, 201, 203; A., 98, 

201,214,217,228, 288: B., 

133, 166, 205, 217, 219, 221, 



IKDEX. 



303 



223, 225, 226, 228. 229, 2.'32, 
233,235,2J7, 2^8, 243,232; 
C, 223, 232; D., 230; E., 
225, 22D, 238, 23'J ; G.,2l)4, 
263; H., 195, 223,239; J., 
169, 197, 201, 203, 219, 223, 
226-30, 235, 236, 238, 244, 
247, 252,285,293; L., 214, 
221 ; M., 77, 197, 220, 223, 
228,249.250; N., 114, 127, 
156,158,170,197,215,218, 
220, 223, 226, 228, 241 ; 0., 
196,202,238,248; P., 215; 
R., 201, 223; S., 147, 197, 
203, 204,218, 237, 239, 254, 
255; T.,114, 195, 223, 233, 
244, 285, 293; W., 226. 

Bruce, 250. 

Brv, 254. 

Brvant, 217, 238, 246, 249- 
*51, 254. 

Buckman, 153, 244, 254. 

iliulingtoii, ix, 39, 41, 42, 54, 
61, 98, 106, 179, 189, 190, 
201, 206, 293. 
5uHinch, 186. 

Billiard, 241, 254. 

Bullock, 294. 
^ Bunker, 33, 77, 110, 111, 122, 
^ 155, 241. 

Hill, 5, 8, 11, 60, 107, 



186,261,265,295; Aurora, 
260, 277, 300; Ass'n, 269, 
294 ; School, 71 ; bank, 34, 
121; battle, 60, 100, 113, 
146; Mon't, 81; Mon't 
Ass'n, 79, 268-69; St., 97. 

Burches, 248. 

Burchmore, 203. 

Burbank, 251. 

Burditt, 133, 152, 166, 194, 
210,212,218,221,222,224, 
226, 229, 240-43, 246, 255, 
258. 

Burgess, 253. 

Burgoyne, 7. 

Burial-Grouud, 74-79, 88, 
185, 191, 192. 

Burk, 4. 

Burlington, 200. 

Burnham, 250, 206. 

Burns (or Burn), 137, 140, 
158, 254. 

Burnsides, 201. 

Burr, 243. 

Barrage, 274. See Beridge. 

Burrill, 245. 

Burrough, 240. 



Burton, 242. 
Butler, 24.5. 295. 
Ikitman, 195, 209, 215. 
Huttertield, 248. 
Byingtou, 238. 
Byran, 239. 
Byrne, 42. 

Cade, 235, 253, 256. 

Calder, 66, 133, 166, 208, 209, 
211. 21.3, 215-17, 220, 222, 
224', 227, 228, 242, 245, 240, 
258. 

Caldicott, 42, 293. 

Caldwell, 224, 236-38, 245, 
249, 253. 

Call, A., 76; C, 117, 137, 
141, 1.58,2-34; H., 76, 137, 
141, 1.58; I., 150, 160; J., 
76, 126, 165, 205, 2-34, 2.35, 
237,238,249; L.,201; M., 
241; P., 235, 253; S., 155, 
1.59, 196, 201, 237, 238, 246, 
258; T., 61, 135, 151, 164; 
W., 76. See Caule. 

Galley, 151. 

Calmet, 289. 

Calvin, 60. 

Cambridge, 5, 6, 10, 66, 67, 
86, 179, 180, 182, 204, 205, 
241-43, 245, 247, 248, 252- 
54, 258, 261, 262, 208, 275, 
276, 283, 293, 295, 300; 
East, 20 : -port, 205 ; West, 
43,251,271. 

Campbell, 205, 232, 253, 254. 

Canada, 47, 95. 

Canal, 31-32, 70, 271. 

Canton, 267. 

Canterbuiy, 180, 192. 

Cape, Ann, 54; Breton, 184; 
Cod, 176. 

Capen, 126, 167. 

Capt, 245. 

Carey, 146, 155. 

Carlton, 33, 49, 98, 129, 136, 
200, 202, 205, 212, 214, 21C, 
218, 221, 223, 226, 243, 245, 
246. 

Carnes, 202. 

Carolinas, 184, 264. 

Can-, 235, 240, 243, 254. 

Carriel. 240. 

Carti^e, 102, 202, 293. 

Carter, 66, 75, 110. 133, 165, 
197,204,213,215,217,219, 
220,223,241,242,245,248, 
249, 255, 257. 



Cartrite, 242, 243. 

Carver, 248, 284. 

Cary, 5, 13, 75,76, 100, 118, 

123,125,157,101,168,201, 

211,241,243,2.55,282,293. 
Caswell, 75, 247. 
Catholics, 29, 38-41, 59-60, 

61, 64, 69. 
Caule, 110. 
Cavendish, 241. 
Census, 22-23, 24 
Center, 117, 141, 194, 199, 

202,204,208,210,212,214, 

216, 220, 222, 225, 228, 230, 

240, 242, 248, 252, 254, 256. 
Cetcherall, 110. 
Chadwick, 174: 
Chalkley, 75. 
Chambe'rlain, 75, 150, 159, 

169, 171. 
Chambers, 78 ; St., 121, 126. 
Champion, 249. 
Chandler, 237, 238, 246, 269. 
Chapin, 26, 42, 189, 274, 293. 
Chaplin, 245, 2.52. 
Chapman, 126, 148, 149, 108; 

St., 148. 
Charitable Ass'n, 279, 295. 
Charles River, 74, 84, 100, 

111, 123, 129, 177, 178; 

do. Av., 88; bridge, 9,18, 

19, 270, 281. 
Charleston, 98. 
Charlestown, see Town, N. 

H., 247. 
Cheever, 13, 65, 78, 123, 125, 

143, 148, 156, 161, 164, 165, 

268, 275, 293. 
Chelmsford, 202, 263. 
Chelsea, 7, 19, 47, 246-48, 

252, 282, 295 ; bridge, 20 ; 

St., 9, 37, 46, 121, 123, 125, 

126. 
Cheney, 252. 
Chesman, 251, 253. 
Chester, 6, 7, 242. 
Chestnut St., 8. 
Cheverus, 69. 
Chicago, 294, 295. 
Chickering, 77, 223, 226, 247, 

248, 253"; 286. 
Chidester, 249. 
Children, 253. 
Childs, 42, 129, 200, 209-11, 

213,21.5,217,240,243,245, 

250, 300. 
Chiswick, 296. 
Chittenden, 250. 



304 



INDEX. 



Choate, 173, 213, 215, 242, 
258. 

Christian (see Art) Ass'n, 61- 
62, 73, 270, 272, 278. 

Christmas, 41, 

Chubb, 254. 

Church, First, 15, 20, 29, 39, 
41, 00, 91, 98, 136, 140, 
294; admissions, 21, 25, 27, 
183, 193-205 ; anniversary, 
(250th), 175-91, 272, 295; 
baptisms, 183, 206-40; 
bells, 53, 189; chapel, 53, 
87; Christian Ass'n, 272; 
funds, 61 ; lot, 173 ; mar- 
riages, 183, 240-55; meet- 
ing-houses {see), and 52-53, 
53-55, 188, 18J ; members, 
21, 25, 27, 187-89 ; minis- 
ters, 42, (tomb) 78, 262 
(see Budington, Fay, 
Miles, Morse) ; Parish, 17, 
25, 63, 186-88, 284; rec- 
ords, 12, 15, 24, 27, 175, 
178, 183, 185, 186, 193-258, 
(195, 201,) 260; relics, 52, 
184, 185; review of, 18J- 
90; revival, 184: salaries, 
26; S. school, 272; statis- 
tics, 187, 188. 

Church Debt Soc, 64. 

Chuiiches (Bvstuti); Bald- 
win, 202; Baptist, 200; 
Berkeley, 272; Bowdoin, 
205; Brattle, 195; Chan- 
ning,198,199, 201; Christ, 
19, 184; First, 52, 178; 
Hanover, 199, 204; Hunt- 
ington's, 201 ; Latlirop's, 
198 ; New South, 204 ; Old 
South, 182, 107, 2(11, 203; 
Park St., 199, 201, 203, 
204; Second, 196; Suffolk, 
269 ; Trhiity, 203. 

(Charlestoicn), Bap- 
tist (1st), 29, 40, 41, 57, 
187, 275, 287; Bethesda, 
57; B. Hill. 57-58, 278; 
Methodist, 28. 29, 40, 41, 
57, 58, 94, 189, 278; St. 
Catharine, 60 ; St. Francis, 
41, 00, 64, 279; St. John, 
40,41,59,61,142,272,278; 
St. Mary, 40, 59-60, 64; 
Unitarian (see Harvard), 
29,40,41,56-57.61,94,146, 
188; Universalist, 20, 40, 
41, 94, 144, 188, 202, 274, 



275 ; Wintlirop, 23, 29, 40, 
41, 58-59, 61, 93, 94, 189, 
199, 201-205, 272-75, 278. 
attendance at, 40-41 ; 



early houses, 50; style 

formed, 51; raised, 177-78. 
Circus, 73. 
City, charter, 43 ; documents, 

273; Hall, 71-72, 102, 115. 
Claims, 112, 155-74. 
Clap, 216, 217, 219, 222, 243, 

247, 248, 252. 
Clare, 251. 
Claremont, 297. 
Clark, 34, 124, 163, 197, 205, 

215,218,221,243,247,249, 

251, 252, 277, 291. 
Cleasby, 75. 
Cleveland, 201. 
Cloutman, 243. 
Cobb, 72, 251. 
Cobble Hill, 12, 85. 
Coburn, 12, 79, 103, 262, 293, 
Cockings, 3, 4. 
Codman, 65, 75, 119. 123, 125, 

147, 164, 172, 209, 257, 281. 
Cofrau, 1.34, 246. 
Coggeshall, 244. 
Cogswell, 194, 251, 258. 
Colbv, 247. 

Cole,' 111, 230, 242, 247. 
Collamore, 132. 
Collier, 24, 286, 287, 283, 290, 

293. 
Collins, 237, 250, 251. 
Colman, 264. 
Colonization, 176, 177. 
Colvill, 4, 266. 
Companies, 273. 
Conant, 121, 122, 129, 1-30, 

165, 1C9, 218. 
Concerts, 71, 73. 
Concord, 84, 240, 242, 247, 

275, 291, 300; St., 80. 
Congregationalism, 14, 24, 

25, 26-8, 39, 40. 
Congress, 6, 7, 12, 267, 268. 
Conn, 219. 220. 222. 244. 
Connecticut, 188, 267. 
Convent, 60-70, 273. 
Converse, 76. 110. 
Cook, 121,230, 241-43,240, 

254, 268. 
Cooker*', 75, 114, 115. 
Coombs, 246. 
Cooper, 218, 221, 222, 225, 

244, 2,53. 
Copp's Hill, 8. 



Corbett, 249, 286. 

Cordis, 33, 90, 125, 134, 143, 
147, 206, 255; Street, 33, 
88, 92, 144. 

Corey, 248, 251 ; Street, 60. 

Cornel, 244. 

Corry, 273. 

Corson, 235, 252. 

Corven, 255. 

Court-House, 9, 116, 174. 

Cox, 19. 

Covtmore, 111. 

Crafts, 95, 144, 242. 

Crane, 237. 

Crawley, 249. 

Crech, 250. 

Cressy, 266. 

Crispi 77. 

Cristy, 235-40, 250, 

Cromwell, 183. 

Crosby, 28, 42, 293. 

Cross St., 92. 

Crossen, 281. 

Crump, 264. 

Cudworth, 204. 

Cunimings, 253. 

Cunningham, 201, 245. 

Curtis, 49, 203, 221, 223, 226, 
244, 246, 275. 

Curvcn, 258. 

Cashing, 42, 99, 245, 251,281. 

Cushman, 42. 

Cutler, 75, 115, 184, 243. 293. 

Cutter,103,119, 122,144, 157, 
171, 210, 222, 227-29, 235, 
241,242,244.245,247, 248, 
250, 252, 254, 262, 293. 

Cutting, 205, 249, 

Dade, 110. 

Dadev, 77. 

Dadly, 250. 

Daggett, 251. 

Damon, 77, 145, 238, 246,250. 

Dana, 37, 44, 105, 269, 275, 

294. 
Dane, 65. 

Danforth, 14, 249, 264. 
Daniels, 246, 252. 
Danvcrs, 4, 202. 
Dartmouth, 196, 251. 
Davidson, 93. 94, 98, 107, 

125.200,224,244,246,247, 

250, 280, 283, 291. 
Davis, 30, 75, 141, 163, 169, 

170, 210, 241, 251. 
Dawson, 268. 
Dayley, 154, 166. 



INDEX. 



313 



205, 245, 249, 251, 252, 267, 
208,297; Hill, 33; St., 55, 
88, 96, 97 ; The, 57. 

Salisbury, 201, 247, 248. 

Sampson, 206, 212, 213,210, 
246, 251, 276. 

Samson, 100. 

Sanborn, 251, 253. 

Sanderson, 228, 245, 251. 

San Francisco, 296. 

Sanger, 220. 

Sargent, 72, 153, 210, 226, 
252-54, 257. 

Sartell, 146. 

Saurin, 286. 

Savage, 80, 2.50. 

Savannah, 242, 249, 250. 

Sawtell, 49, 117, 250. 
"Sawyer, 34, 35, 44, 93, 94, 
101,102,202,231,2.3.3,2.36- 
39, 245-47, 274, 280, 299. 

Scank, 273. 

Schoolhouses (old), 17, 186, 
191; (new) 44, 72-73; B. 
Hill, 71; Frothingham, 72 ; 
Harvard, 72, 73, 140, 142 ; 
Prescott, 72 ; Warren, 72 ; 
"Winthrop, 72. 

Schools, 72-73,278; cost, 21, 
73; committee, 21; fund, 
61; Infant, 62, 270, 279; 
no. of scholars, 73; Sun- 
day, 29, 102, 272 ; teachers, 
263; trustees, 282. 

School St., 96. 

Schultz, 250. 

Sconce point. 111. 

Scotland, 283, 285, 296. 

Scott, xii, 28, 76, 209-11, 21.3, 
214, 223, 244, 247, 248, 252, 
258, 286, 289, 296. 

Scotter, 157, 257. 

Scottow, 116. 

Scribner, 298. 

Sears, 79. 

Sedgwick, 121, 183, 251. 

Selfridge, 286. 

Seminary, 25, 35, 69, 278. 

Sergeant, 246. 

Sewall, 66, 118. 

Sej'mour, 42. 

Shakespeare, 176. 

Shattuck, 203, 232, 236, 244, 
245, 248, 252, 253, 

Shaw, 89, 280. 

Sheafe, 14, 65, 117, 171. 

Shed, 153, 172, 173, 254. 

Shepard, 167, 182, 185, 194, 



203,208,209,211,212,217, 

210,221,222,225,242,251, 

256, 257, 262, 299. 
Sherman, 257. 

Ship-building, 18, 34, 35, 48. 
Shore, 114. 
Shrewsbury, 201. 
Silliman, 50. 
Simonds, 200, 204, 212, 214, 

217, 218, 238, 245, 247, 256, 

258, 299. 
Sisson, 222, 224, 227. 
Sivret, 147, 
Skelton, 27, 199, 201, 223, 

226-29, 231. 
Skillings, 219, 248. . 
Skimmer, 204, 232, 236, 243, 

245, 255, 258. 
Skinner, 35, 130, 132, 195, 

220,221,223,225,226,228; 

& H., 120, 130. 
Slade, 254. 
Slat, 245. 
Slaves, 123, 280. 
Sloan, 241, 242, 247. 
Small, 98. 
Smelt, 291. 
Smith; C, 92,113, 238; D., 

212 ; E., 188, 244, 249, 288 ; 

G., 2.30, 2-37 ; H., 235, 236; 

I., 165, 209, 211, 212. 242, 

268; J., 77, 79, 170, 209, 

2.36-39, 251, 296; L., 249; 

M., 246; P., 211, 258; S., 

249; W., 239. 
Smollet, 280, 288. 
Snow, 92, 130, 156, 162, 172, 

197, 206, 244, 245, 255. 
Social life, 23, 37, 38, 104- 

108. 

Societies, 62-65, 100, 104,278- 
79, 283, 285, 286, 290. 

Soldiers ; monument, 82 ; Re- 
lief, 64 ; tombs, 78 ; Union, 
67. 

Soley, 27, 77,78,89,120,127, 

198, 203, 213, 215, 217, 222, 
224-27, 229-32, 242, 245, 
247, 253, 273. 

Somers, 76. 

Somerset, 8. [85. 

Somerville, ix, 43, 47, 48, 67, 

Soule, 276. 

Southampton, 176. 

Souther, 154, 161. 

Spafford (or Spofford), 170, 

202, 241, 248. 
Sparks, 12, 268, 293. 



Sparrell, 253. 

Spaulding, 28, 245, 246. 

Spear, 288. 

Spelman, 296. 

Sprague, 21, 188, 276; A.,' 

253 ; B., 153 ; J., 65, 164, 

210; N., 170; P., 42; R., 

61, 118, 128,168,184; S., 

171, 259. 
Square (The old), 17, 32, 33, 

45, 46, 48, 51, 89, 95, 113, 

115, 116, 120-24, 178, 179, 

185, 186, 277, i^85. 
Stanley, 98, 249, 254. 
Stanton, 122, 128, 150, 156, 

165, 241. 
Stark, 208. 
Starr, 245. 
State Prison, 37, 46, 79, 84- 

85, 148, 188, 279, 280, 290, 

291, 293. 
Stearns, 153, 156, 173, 213, 

246, 251, 254, 255. 
Stebbins, 285. 
Stedman, 158. 
Sterne, 286. 
Stetson, 27, 78, 98, 200,211- 

14, 210, 218, 220, 221, 224, 

220-28, 230, 231, 233, 254. 
Steuben, 293. 
Stevens, 65, 76, 1-32, 145, 161, 

171, 183, 196, 203, 206, 207, 

209-11, 214, 218, 242, 247, 

248, 253, 250, 264, 276, 296, 

299. 
Stickney, 203, 249, 253. 
Stidsonj 111. 
Stiles, 5, 6, 7. 
Stillman, 273. 
Stimpson, 77, 150, 160, 195, 

207, 210, 214, 215, 222, 250, 

255, 256. 
Stitson, 78. 
Stitts, 242. 
St. John's, 250. See 

Churches. 
Stocks, 17. 
Stoddard, 200, 219, 221, 222, 

244-47. 
Stone, 44, 49, 126, 150, 161, 

108, 197, 244, 245, 252, 299. 
Storer, 77. 
Storv, 82. 
Stow, 42, 245. 
Stowell, 2-35, 250, 291. 
Stower, 76. 
Stratliam, 205. 
Stratton, 253. 



314 



INDEX. 



Streeter, 272. 

Streets, 31; no. of, 18, 35. 

Stringbam, 184. 

Strong, 30. 

Studlev, 47, 238, 239. 

Sudbury, 241, 250. 

Suffolkj 176, 177. 270. 

Sullivan, 30, 32, 37, 198, 242, 
245,253,255,271,275,299. 

Sumner, 30, 150, 292. 

Sunday Schools, 29, 102. 

Supple, 42, 279. 

Survey (17G7), 120, 122, 123, 
134, 147, 148, 151. 

Sutton, 250. 

Swallow, 117. 

Swan, 101, 156,194; B., 132- 
33, 243; C, 21, 32, 117, 
132,207,209; D., 170; H., 
207; J., 18, 194, 256, 258; 
S., 21, 22, 23, 90, 117, 157, 
165, 197, 207. 

Sweetser, 196; B., 171; C, 
199,226,243; E., 247; F., 
242; H., 155, 164, 196, 199, 
226. 257; J., 66, 165, 172, 
247,258; L., 202; P., 196, 
215, 243; S., 77, 141, 152, 
153, 160, 165, 201, 215, 242, 
243 ; W., 147. 

Swett, 11, 45, 267; wharf, 
111. 

Swift, 92, 241, 286. 

Sylvester, 217, 225. 

Symmes, 76, 180, 249, 250, 
276, 299. 

Symonds. See Simonds. 

Synod, 180. 

Talbot, 258. 

Talleyrand, 107. 

Tapley, 203, 251. 

Tappan, 42, 282, 299. 

Tarbell, 76. 

Taverns, 9, 17, 48, 89, 114, 

146, 151, 156, 282. 
Tay, 244. 
Taylor, 167, 168, 173, 184, 197, 

201,212,240,242,250,251, 

254, 259, 289. 
Teal (or Tecl), 128, 153-54, 

165, 172. 218, 219, 2-?l, 224, 

231,2.32.244,240.248,253. 
Temple, 119, 152, 153, 173, 

257 : farm, 08, 154. 
Ten Hills, 10, 48, 154. 
Tenny, 236. 
Tewksbury, 205, 233, 252. 



Thacher, 6, 7. 

Thanksgiving, 178. 

Thatcher, 182, 247, 263, 299. 

Thayer, 58, 62, 220, 222, 225, 
238, 239, 245, 246, 249. 

Thomas, 98, 127, 150, 159, 
171, 172, 215, 218, 222, 225, 
263, 282, 284. 

Thomastown, 198, 202, 248. 

Thompson, 168 ; A. R., 88, 
94, 147, 202, 203, 224, 226, 
228-32, 299; B., 35, 88, 
136, 145, 214, 237, 263, 269, 
279,299; C, 216, 217,223, 
229, 250, 268, 276 ; D., 257, 
299; E., 171, 203,207,217, 
220, 223, 224, 226, 229, 243, 
251, 2.56, 276 ; F., 49 ; G., 
224; H., 223; J., 25, 89, 
94, 121, 207, 226, 229, 241, 
256,258,272; M., 206, 221, 
247; N.,276; 0., 230, 232; 
P., 252; R., 218; S., 113, 
198,200,206,207,211,217, 
218,229,231,246,247,256, 
272, 287; T., 16, 34, 145, 
163,200,206,209,211,214, 
216, 217, 219, 221, 223, 224, 
220,240,242,255; St., 136, 
143,144; Square, 9, 10, 11, 
50, 144. 

Thorning, 249. 

Thorp, 244, 254. 

Thurston, 299. 

Tibbets, 251. 

Ticknor, 269, 295. 

Tidd, 246. 

Tilden, 239, 254. 

Tiller, 253. 

Tinney, 234. 

TirreC 211. 

Titus, 143, 274. 

Todd, 188, 204, 253, 299. 

Tolman, 251. 

Tomlinson, 252. 

Topsham, 201. 

Torrey, 246. 

Towle, 41. 

Town, 200; condition (1834), 
35-38; documents, 279: 
estate, 174; Hall, 37, 71, 
72, 73, 100, 105; Hill, 2, 
9, 15, 17, 32, 33, 52, 60, 
111,117,129.175,177,178, 
180, 191, 192; House, 121, 
291; literature, 188, 261; 
losses, 22, 99, 100, 157-74, 
267 ; meetings, 12, 16, 37, 



61, 71, 105, 279; officers, 
21-22 ; population, 18, 2.3, 
24, 35, 36, 45, 187, 188; 
see Records; review of, 
190-91 ; valuations, 12, 45. 

Townley, 42. 

Townsend, 8, 133, 137, 138, 
155, 158, 159, 166, 170, 241, 
282. 

Tracts, 9, 187, 283; Soc, 63, 
284. 

Tracy, 154. 

Trafton, 299. 

Training-tield, 9, 82, 133, 155. 

Tranavre, 241. 

Transcontinental, 296. 

Trask, 171, 212, 215, 218, 219, 
222, 236, 247, 250, 258. 

Treadwell, 198, 245. 

Trees, 18, 93, 94, 96, 148. 

Trenton, 277. 

Trevett, 227, 233. 

Trials, 280-81. 

Tripe, 241. 

Trout, 170. 

Trow, 131, 162, 165. 

Trowbridge, 216. 

Troy, 298. 

True. 266. 

Trufant, 239, 251. 

Trull, 129. 

Trumbull, 22, 76, 122, 125, 
133, 157, 166, 246, 256, 267. 

Truro, 80. 

Tuck, 131. 

Tucker, 163, 247, 254. 

Tudor, 6, 7, 79. 

Tufts, 29; A., 27, 88, 136, 
194,203,208,210,211,213, 
216, 218, 220, 222, 223, 230, 
236-38, 251, 257; A. L., 
211, 250; A. R., 215; B., 
203; C, 2.35. 238, 239, 244; 
D.,153, 194,202,208,249; 
Dr., 203; E., 223, 236, 2-38, 
290, 299; G., 37, 202, 2-30, 
231,233-35, 2-37, 238,248; 
IT., 205, 233, 23.5, 241,242; 
J., 205, 208, 228, 230, 233- 
35, 237, 2.38,246,289,299; 
L., 207, 241; M., 200-3, 
213, 227, 231, 246, 247, 251. 
254, 290; N., 35, 68, 80, 
91, 93, 145, 200, 219, 248; 
P., 68, 113, 153, 156, 172, 
201,252; S., 153,173,220, 
227, 234, 237-39, 244, 253, 
280 ; T., 156, 172, 227, 242, 



INDEX. 



315 



247,249; W., 153, 174, 203, 

208, 215, 218, 238, 253; 
Col. Hill, 50. 

Tunnel (to B.), 271. 

Tapper, 249. 

Turner, 25, 20, 156, 170, 197, 

209, 210, 212, 213, 215-19, 
221, 224, 225, 227, 238-41, 
243, 246, 250, 271, 272, 287, 
290, 299. 

Turnpikes, 32. 

Turrell, 246. 

Tuskegee, 297. 

Twist, 251. 

Twombl.r, 42, 97, 175, 202, 

273-75", 300. 
Twycross, 221, 222, 227, 232, 

243, 244. 
Tyler, 80, 245, 251. 
Tysick, 168. 

Underwood, 234, 237, 240, 

249, 252, 253. 
Union; Librarj', 132; St., 

9, 33, 58, 88, 90, 143, 146, 

288, 294. 
Unitarians, 27-28, 39, 56-57, 

64, 272. 
Universalists, 25-26, 40, 56, 

63, 272, 274, 281, 288. 
Upham, 76, 98, 118, 131,267. 
Upton, 205. 
Ursula (St.), 69. 
Usher, 154. 
Utica, 297. 

Van Brunt, 59. 

Vanderlyn, 72. 

Vanvoras, 246. 

Varney, 98, 145. 

Varnum, 30, 251. 

Views, 3. [246. 

Vinal, 97, 201, 202, 227, 244, 

Vine St., 60. 

Vintin, 242. 

Vinton, 276. 

Virgil, 299. 

Virginia, 296. 

Voltaire, 292. 

Vose, 198, 215, 243, 249, 274. 

Vulgiers, 249. 

Waddell, 291. 

Wade, 199, 200. 

Wadsworth, 237. 

Wait, 76, 117, 128, 131, 157, 

161, 171, 222, 225, 227, 245- 

47, 252, 257. 



Waldo, 76, 233, 234, 250, 
276. 

Wales, 204. t 

Walker; A., Ill, 196, 210, 
225,248,288; C, 213, 215, 
222; E., 218, 224,243; G., 
216, 226; H., 227; J., 28, 
42, 57, 89, 218, 222, 251, 
254, 276, 290, 294, 300 ; L., 
226; M., 211, 220, 222, 225, 
238; T., 27, 34, 35, 88, IJO, 
210,211,213,215,210,220, 
222, 224, 226, 227, 258, 288 ; 
W., 37, 88, 137, 249. 

Wallace, 133, 106, 197, 254 ; 
Court, 111. 

Walley, 43. 

Waipole, 204, 244, 249. 

Walter, 209, 211, 214. 

Wapping, 111, 123. 

Ward, 37, 121, 147, 217, 221. 

Ware, 59, 289. 

Warner, 254. 

Warren; A., 198, 202; C 
232; E., 199, 218, 222 
Gen. J., 3, 80, 81, 135, 268 
274; G. W., 44, 49, 81, 89 
98, 101, 107, 117, 118, 131 
230, 270, 276, 279, 281, 300 
H., 228, 234; I., 27, 88, 117 
131,199,202,228,230; J. 
27, 198, 218, 219, 222, 226 
232,234; M., 219; R.,202 
S., 254. 

Avenue, 89, 120, 280 



Bridge, 20, 46, 123, 270 
271; Hall, 20; Phalanx 
66; Savings Bank, 35, 101 
118,208, 291; School, 72 
Statue, 81; Street, 9, 16 
60, 62, 120, 121, 126, 128 
133,144; Tavern, 135, 282 

Washburn, 246. 

Washington, 98, 135, 151 
280, 300; Fire Soc.,-«65 
100, 278; Gen. G., 12, 30 
72, 107, 282, 288, 299 
Hall, 99, 104, 118, 139 
Head, 285, 286; St., 32. 
33, 35, 90, 91, 132. 

Waterman, 24. 

Waters, 128. 130, 107, 235 
241, 243, 258. 

Water St., 16, 88, 89, 113 
123, 126, 136. 

Watertown, 5, 248, 268. 

Watson, 170. 

Watts, 282, 286, 288 



Waverley House, 48, 73, 89, 

115, 124, 132. 
Weatherby, 215, 241. 
Webb, 88," 254, 258, 268. 
Webster, 72, 223, 267. 
Wedgwood, 240, 257. 
Weeks, 42. 
Welch (or Welsh), 121, 125, 

128, 130, 105, 166, 200, 250, 

254, 259, 300. 
Wellington, 240. 
Wellnian, 242. 
Wells, 289. 
Wcllsted, 70, 
Wesson, 280. 
West, 242, 282, 284. 
Westfield, 240, 241. 
Westminster, 283, 286. 
Weston, 250. 
Whaart, 170. 
Wharf Co., 46, 292. 
Wliarton, 284. 
Wharves, 45, 46; no. of, 18, 

35. 
Wheeler, 147, 167, 202, 230, 

24G, 248. 
Wheelock, 199, 247. 
Wheelwright, 298. 
Wheildon, 132, 262, 269, 291- 

92, 300. 
Whigs, 42, 269. 
Whipple, 242. 
White, 05, 119, 126, 133,145, 

164, 240, 243, 251, 257, 277, 

281, 284. 
Whitefield, 184. 
Whiting, 214, 218, 220, 222, 

225, 2^28, 230, 232, 233, 235, 

245, 247, 254, 258. 
Whitmarsh, 204, 223, 250. 
Whitmore, 271. 
Whitney, 143, 248, 283. 
Whittemore ; A., 16, 156,194, 

225,229,242; C.,256; D., 

152; E., 208; H.,243; I., 

249; J., 128, 152, 153, 160- 

62, 100,225,227, 229,255; 

N., 208, 210; S., 210,249. 
Widdifield, 252. 
Wild (or Wilds), 225, 251. 
Wilder, 248, 209, 276. 
Wiley, 197, 203, 207, 208, 

210,212,214,217, 219,253, 

254, 256, 257. 
Wilkins, 238, 254. 
Willard, 34, 79, 91, 231, 282. 
Williams, 152, 160, 198, 209, 

218, 224, 241, 245, 289. 



316 

Willington, 203, 207, 208, 
256. 

Willis, 188, 266. 

Willoughby, 184. 

Wilson, 28, 76, 94, 176, 178, 
201, 203, 222, 226, 229, 232- 
34, 236, 248, 277, 291, 300. 

Winchester Home, 62, 270. 

Windmill Hill, 191. 

Windsor, 33. 

Winn, 249. 

Winship, 205, 232-35, 237, 
240, 248, 249, 257. 

Jointer Hill, 37, 95, 290. 

Winthrop, 43, 104, 114, 116, 
154, 170-78, 268, 269, 291, 
295, 300; Church, 28, 29, 
40, 41, 58-59, 61, 73, 272 
(see Churches) ; School, 
72 ; Street, 60, 90. 

Wiscasset, 350. 



INDEX. 

Wiscoat, 250. 

Witchcraft, 180, 181. 

Witt, 254. 

Woburn, 201, 204, 251, 254, 
286. 

Wolcut, 142, 158. 

Wood, 13, 33, 150, 156, 159, 
170,194,197,214,217,219, 
221, 223, 220, 240-42, 244, 
250, 255, 257, 258 ; D., 11, 
33, 78, 90, 94, 145, 146, 148- 
50, 156, 162, 219, 257, 259 ; 
D. Jr., 143, 145, 148, 102, 
194; St., 10, 57, 90, 94, 
145, 282. 

Woodbury, 197, 236, 254. 

Woodstock, 20. 

Woodward, 130, 194, 200, 
208, 210, 212, 225, 246. 

Worcester, 5, 201, 267, 275, 
287, 294. 



-^ 



Workhouse, 17. 

Worthen, 249. 

Wren, 56. 

Wrentham, 267. 

Wright, 248. 

W3-att, 235, 279. 

Wyer, 22, 65, 78, 115, 116, 121, 
142, 143, 151, 157, 165, 170, 
202, 243, 244, 247, 250. 

Wyman, 21, 35, 229-37, 248- 
52, 260, 274, 300. 

Yale (Coll.) 184, 193. 

Yeaton, 250. 

Yend, 248. 

York, 276, 282 ; -shire, 177. 

Young, 205, 250, 254, 255, 

288. 
Young Men's C A., 41. 



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